1. The official Sherdog Store is back! Check it out! » Discuss it here! »

Drawing them in

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by Redtarget, Jun 1, 2014.

  1. Fire of Youth Green Belt

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2011
    Messages:
    1,279
    Likes Received:
    13
    Location:
    Australia
    I don't remember it but it is possible??? Do you remember anything else about it? At the very least I should be able to say whether it sounds like something I would say.
     
  2. SinkOrSwim White Belt

    Joined:
    May 13, 2014
    Messages:
    94
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Australia
    I like this explanation. You teach your opponent how you will act over several exchanges. Take note of their reactions, and counter them (explained much better above).
    There are a number of moves,feints,combos you can do but its the overall strategy (above) that's more important.
     
  3. apizur** Aggressive Finesse.

    Joined:
    Aug 10, 2010
    Messages:
    3,794
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Tampa
    I thought I did, but for some reason I remember it being someone with a green belt. If it was you that kept mentioning it I was going to ask if you'd be willing to write up a post about your experience and interpretation of the centerline concept and where you go with it, but if it wasn't.... Nevermind. :redface:
     
  4. Fire of Youth Green Belt

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2011
    Messages:
    1,279
    Likes Received:
    13
    Location:
    Australia
    I dont think it was me. However, my view on the centreline is that it can be very beneficial but in different ways. If you take the external angle, you can use your closest arm to block whilst hitting their exposed regions with your far hand. If you take the centerline, you need to use both arms to maintain that control but you get the benefit of opening up their guard for clean shots down the middle.

    For my first 10 years of training I had a high wide guard, invite the attacks down the middle, elude them and counter. It worked fine. Then over the next 5 years I took more of a peekaboo type guard, using more laternaly movement and controlling parrys to take control of the outside, punish as I come back at them or turn them further before punishing them. It also worked fine. Over the last few years, I have been training Muay Chaiya where they have a 45 degree centre controlled guard. Now I have more confidence taking the centerline or the outer angle and the options that come from both.

    I think it largely depends on the guard you use. If your guard is further in front, then you are protecting your centreline but you are also in a good starting position to wedge your way into your opponents centreline. If you have a wide guard, then you give up your centreline but are in a good starting position to spin/pivot/step off at angles to take the external position.

    I know this sounds overly simplistic. Throughout the dynamic dance between you and your opponent, you are most likely threatening one and taking the other or steering your opponent into one type of movement so you can counter appropriately. But thats half the fun. Knowing the strengths and weaknesses of any given position will put you in a better position strategically to make use of it.
     
  5. TmacRmac** Orange Belt

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2014
    Messages:
    324
    Likes Received:
    0
    Basic ideas for the simple minded. Don't look in the 1st one too much, 2nd one is straightfoward.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.