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does strength training help

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by scotty1444, Jan 17, 2006.

  1. Soulfly Guest

    There is no uber muscle for defending an arm lock. If you don't have correct timing, you will lose every time on one applied correctly. Jujigatame allows the tori to use all of their muscles to complete the arm lock, against the other person's bicep. Research armbar escapes and talk to an instructor.

    I think you might have the wrong attitude for training, also.
     
  2. scotty1444 Orange Belt

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    thanks very much ill try and change my attidude thanks mate.
     
  3. scotty1444 Orange Belt

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    does anyone know if there is any mma clubs or comptitions in Northern Ireland.
     
  4. mmagic Yellow Belt

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    As a demonstration, take your right arm and bend it at a slight angle from being straight, then push down on it with your other arm and resist this motion. You will see that the primary muscle engaged are your forearm nearest your bicep (often called the 'blade' of your forearm), and your bicep muscles. So, probably the most effective exercises you can do for that resistance are hammer curls and close-grip palms-out pullups. Both will work your upper forearm and your lower bicep muscle.

    Dumbell Hammer curls - Do one arm at a time. While standing, take a dumbell in your hand, let your arm rest at your side, with your palm facing directly into your body. Then bend your arm straight up toward the sky, without moving your elbow. Pause briefly at the top and squeeze the muscles, then slowly go back down. If you look in the mirror, it kind of looks like you are using a hammer (although usually you are pushing a hammer down primarly instead of pulling it up). Make sure to maintain good form by keeping your upper arm pointing straight toward the ground and not letting your elbow move around. You may have to use very little weight to accomplish this at first, but form is everything. Focus so that all of the power you are using to move the dumbell is in your upper forearm and biceps.

    EZ-bar or Barbell Reverse Bicep Curls - This is performed much like the hammer curls, but using both hands at once. Depending on how wide or tight your grip is, you will focus less or more on your forearm muscles, respectively. It is usually impossible to do this motion without moving your elbows because your arms will probably be at angles toward your chest, so focus on MINIMIZING elbow movement. Again, use as low of weights as necessary to achieve proper form.

    Close-grip palms-out pullups - On a pullup bar, assume a close grip, hands about 1-1.5 fists' width apart (imagine a third fist in between your actual fists for spacing). Perform pullups starting from a low-hanging position. The trick to this is to focus and keep your lifting power in your forearms, rather than in your shoulders or back. You will inevitably use some power from your back, but you should find it much less strenuous to your back than doing a wide-grip pullup.

    In any given workout it does not make sense to do more than 1 or 2 of these exercises along with your other bicep exercises, because they are fairly redundant considering what a small percentage of muscle you are targetting.

    In addition you may find it helpful to strengthen your lower forearm muscles with forearm exercises such as palms-up dumbell wrist curls, palms-down dumbell wrist curls, and so forth.

    IMPORTANT: Also note that in an actual situation in which you are being arm barred, you will not ONLY use your forearm blade and biceps; you will also be using your shoulder (probably mostly your front deltoids) to try to torque your arm toward your body, your outer chest to do the same (you can hit that part of your chest with dumbell/machine/cable flyes), and your entire core (hips, lower back, abs) to torque all of your weight opposing the arm bar. Quickly you can begin to see that it is a little silly to only lift in order to counter one particular move, and that your best bet is to use a wide variety of exercises to increase your strength all over.
     
  5. scotty1444 Orange Belt

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    thanks very much that was really helpful u rock. ok well ill do dat and exercise my hole body im bit ignorent and i still have to change my attitude towards training. this has really helped im still an ametur as u cn figure.
     
  6. deadlift ryan Yellow Belt

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    dude
    i competed in strongman comps before i got into bjj and strength dont help for shit when your a white belt up against good blues and purples
     
  7. colinm Brown Belt

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    hold on a sec dude...

    there is no way - and i mean absolutely no way - that you will ever have an arm strong enough to resist an armbar with a curling motion...you need to learn proper escapes. its like trying to match the amount someone can deadlift with the amount you can curl, its just not gonna happen.

    i have the feeling you need to go to the strength and power forum and read the stickies.
     
  8. Flounder Purple Belt

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    Length of time spent training has little to do with the amount of functional strength you gain. In actuality, short workouts are better. It has more to do with how hard & heavy you work. You can make great gains by doing heavy singles. The main component, is you have to work like you've never worked before.
     
  9. Wolverine Green Belt

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    Colinm is right. You need excape techniques to get our of an armbar, not strength. What is the point of trying to just lay there and fight an armbar when you can use technique to get out of the armbar.

    Wolverine
    ///
     
  10. SmashiusClay Avatar of Cyttorak

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    Technique beats strength, but when the technique levels are near equal the stronger fighter will almost always come out on top.

    Oh, and trying to resist an armbar with your bicep alone by doing curls is like trying to catch whales by using a pencil with some string as a harpoon. unless you are fighting someone who has a deadlift less than your curl then they'll win. Learn to use proper technique to avoid and escape the armbar and then use strength to help you control your opponent.
     
  11. scotty1444 Orange Belt

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    cheers, thanks. its safe to say that im stupid
     
  12. FutureBxer Brown Belt

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    strength training carries over very well to grappling as it does many other sports but technique is still superior(as stated a billion times).

    So strength train to aid you, but not to build your game on.
     
  13. scotty1444 Orange Belt

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    oh yeah what u all think the royce gracie and matt huges fight will be like.
     
  14. scotty1444 Orange Belt

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    cheers future bxer, im going to keep at bjj cuz like its all technique and keep doin my strenght work. then im doin boxing.
     
  15. colinm Brown Belt

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    just to reiterate, go to strength and power forum and read the stickies if you're strength training for grappling.
     
  16. Placebo_ Yellow Belt

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    Strength helps a lot in grappling. I've won a lot of matches with equally skilled opponents just because I could overpower them.
     
  17. scotty1444 Orange Belt

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    thanks very much for those last replys.
     
  18. scotty1444 Orange Belt

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    colinm i was readin da other topic and it was funny as hell wen u were slaberin to some guy about some snake boxin shit. respect man.
     
  19. scotty1444 Orange Belt

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    this forum has to be da best people act give u advice all da other 1s i was on dnt
     
  20. mmagic Yellow Belt

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    First of all, saying that the "length of time spent training has little to do with the amount of functional strength you gain," is positively ridiculous. In fact there is a direct correlation. It is true that there are many mitigating factors and that, at a certain point, the benefits drop sharply. Let's test this out. Once a day, do one pushup, and then go home. REAP THE REWARDS!

    Compound movements are the conerstones of effective muscle gain, but they are better when followed up by isolation movements. There are a lot of cases in which "less is more," but I bet you can't tell me exactly where the cutoff point is when a workout is too short. Once you have developed stabilizing muscles and good muscle recruitment over the course of months, lifting "hard and heavy" for 1 or 2 reps usually equates to lifting "with poor form." And we all know that poor form does not yield good results. The guys that try to lift so heavy that they have no form left are the ones that get the same shitty results week after week.
     

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