Do you journal

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by Fandango, Jan 6, 2015.

  1. Fandango

    Fandango White Belt

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    I'm going to try to journal the techniques I learn this year... For those of you who do this, how do you format your notes? Mine ends up looking like a long paragraph and seems a bit unrealistic to regularly spend 30 minutes a day writing all of these out detail by detail
     
  2. DaviDreadlocks

    DaviDreadlocks White Belt

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    What I do is list that steps to the move we went over. Then under each step I write down a few key points to the technique. I'm still new but I've noticed I right down less key points since I know some of them now. I would also suggest using ever note for your logging. Its great you can tag the notes so there searchable by GI or no GI by the move or by anything . That way if you want to go back it's easy to find

    I also long my live rolling . Just jotting down what I tapped to so I can go back and maybe see were I am messing up at.
     
  3. Uchi Mata

    Uchi Mata Preaching the gospel of heel hooks and left kicks

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    I did it for a while, never helped much and when I've looked back at my notes they're incoherent. Maybe I was just bad at it, but aside from making a list of moves that you learned at a seminar to practice later I'm not sure it's as helpful as people say.
     
  4. cms9690

    cms9690 Green Belt

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    Yeah, I journal just about every class I go to.

    Keep it short and simple, use pictures from the internet if you need to.

    Try to break everything down into steps

    Example:

    Double Under Pass:
    1.) Do this
    2.) Then this
    3.) Now this (Unless they do X)
    3a.) Do this if they do X
    4a.) Next do this

    etc, etc.


    I always write what I figured out during rolls that I hadn't realized previously or how I felt that day, it really helps IMO.
     
  5. Hywel Teague

    Hywel Teague Orange Belt

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    Only in the very early days when learning terminology

    About two years ago I spent a few months tracking frequency of training, intensity etc –*didn't seem worth it

    Nowadays only track my strength workouts
     
  6. tenktriangles

    tenktriangles Blue Belt

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    Not a direct answer, but imho, the same few minutes you'd spend on journaling applied to teaching someone else that technique is far better. Just find someone who wasn't in class.
     
  7. DocSooner

    DocSooner Orange Belt

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    I've taken notes since my first day of training and have hundreds of pages of notes over the years. For the first year or so nearly every class contained something novel and I would write it down. The act of organizing my thoughts and putting them on paper helped reinforce the technique, but after so much time notes are only useful if you review them. It is interesting to review my journals over the years and see how my style for recording has evolved. In the beginning it was very stilted, "put R arm here, L foot there..." Now it is much more conceptual. Today I only take notes if I learn a new technique (rare these days) or I have some particular revelation or insight about a technique with which I'm already familiar.

    My oldest journals are really only of historical interest at this point, but still hold great sentimental value. My journals of more recent years are very valuable as a catalog of techniques that I may have forgotten, or rarely utilize. I'll refer back to them on a regular basis if I'm researching a particular position or technique.

    I keep a chronologic journal for classes and seminars, but even more valuable than that is a separate journal that I've organized by position. I'll focus on a particular technique or set of techniques (i.e. kimura or half guard passing) and gradually work through a set of resources (my notes, DVDs, YT videos, online training, etc) and organize them into a coherent game plan that I'll use to guide my training, or teaching, for weeks and months at a time. For example, in the past month I've accumulated about 20 pages of notes on kimura control top game. It's basically a detailed map of everything I've been taught about that particular game. I'll break it into pieces, then train and test in practice. After a month or so I'll move on to something else. I try to alternate between top and bottom games and hit all different positions, with particular focus given to weak spots that come out in training. As another example, I was having great success with kimura top game but having more trouble with much heavier, technical players smashing my guard so my focus has shifted to transitions between close and longer range guards, specifically spider guard. And thus the organization and note taking process begins again...
     
  8. Barnacle Goose

    Barnacle Goose White Belt

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    Yeah I have just started one, have had about 3 and a bit weeks off the mat due to staph and some other skin shit which is ridiculously frustrating.

    I've only been training for about a month so flow charts have really helped me map out core techniques I want my game to have (Sweeps, escapes and subs in every position if applicable). Has also allowed me to prioritise certain drilling moves as well as write down key concepts for grappling overall, passing, escapes, etc.

    Once I start writing down techniques I'm working on (Using trainer explanation, BJJ university and Youtube) they should not only help me get movements down but also connect the dots between various movements e.g. Key movements for mount and side control escapes include framing, him movement/escapes, etc. I think this will provide a nice way to link everything conceptually.

    That is all I have so far but I may start adding other things including rolls, how I felt training, etc. However so far I'll stick to what I have as it may get to be to much work.
     
  9. bLikeWater

    bLikeWater Orange Belt

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    I did it for the first year or so and found it extremely helpful. As an intermediate grappler, I'm not sure how helpful it would be, but in the beginning, when I had little to no context for grappling, I think it was really useful.

    As soon as I would get home, I would sit and write down everything I could remember that my coach said about a technique. In a half-size notebook, I could easily devote a whole page to a single technique. My coach gave a lot of details, and I tried to remember and write down all of them.

    I would then go back later and review what I'd written, which gave me the opportunity to memorize all the little steps of a technique as well as visualize my way through it multiple times.

    That way, when I finally got to my first rolling session (my gym made us wait a month,) I already had 10-20 techniques that I KNEW how to do. I wasn't good at them, or even really capable of successfully implementing them on anybody yet. But I knew HOW to do them.

    In my first rolling sessions, I wasn't thinking 'oh man, how do I do a triangle again?' I would think 'triangle' and would know: 'wrist control, open your guard, shove one arm between your legs and pull the other across your body, base your foot on the same side as the arm you're controlling on his same-side hip, shoot your hips and your other leg straight up in the air, etc.' even though I had only been shown the triangle one time, weeks earlier.

    I often didn't understand the reason for doing certain things, but I wrote them down and then memorized them anyway, so even if I didn't know what they were for, I still knew to do them.

    That way I wasn't wasting mat time with techniques that failed because I couldn't remember them. When my techniques failed, I could often pin-point at which step things had gone wrong, which would allow me to analyze what I could do differently in the future.

    Overall, I feel like this approach allowed me to take a kind of strategic and analytical approach to training almost immediately that could have otherwise taken months or years to develop.

    Early on, I also seemed to improve a lot faster than the other people who started around the same time, and I think this had lot to do with it. I was able to develop a large repertoire of techniques and start work on fine-tuning those techniques much faster than my peers, because I wasn't forgetting any of what I was being taught.

    I should note that this method was so effective because I was devoted to it. Like many of us. I was quite obsessed when I first started, and this was one of the ways I channeled it. I would sit and spend half an hour or more after class (and shower and food, of course) recalling and writing down every detail of every technique. I would also spend time every day studying that notebook. For a long time, I would make my way through the whole notebook every single day. Reinforcing every detail of every technique every day. And all without spending any of my precious mat-time.

    But I don't think you have to do all that for it to be effective. That's how you make it REALLY effective, but even just writing something down once will greatly improve your ability to recall it.


    TLDR; I think any amount of journaling is good with little to no upper-limit on how beneficial it can be depending on how much time you're willing to put into it.
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2015
  10. Matsukaze

    Matsukaze Blue Belt

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    I did when I first started but then I discovered every tech I was being shown was on youtube . Now when I need a refresher I just look it up on youtube
     
  11. Einarr

    Einarr Banned Banned

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    Journals are for gays and little girls.
     
  12. genki sugoi

    genki sugoi Blue Belt

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    This thread made me think about starting one up for 2015 since we have free notebooks at my work. But this made my LOL and reconsider.
     
  13. Headkicktoleg

    Headkicktoleg Steel Belt

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    I would think this would be the easiest way to do it. Maybe just list the moves you learned and refresh yourself when necessary
     
  14. peregrine

    peregrine Kahuna Dog

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    I've done journals for various things... ultimately I alwaus have the greatest growth. Using one is one of my primary new years habits. I also take notes on my sparring. What worked? Opponents lead? Style? Won/lost by?
     
  15. Chr9is

    Chr9is Blue Belt

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    I definitely do.

    When I first started they were super in depth(techniques, how I felt that day, sleep schedule, etc) but as time went on I simplified it to techniques drilled and a couple things I noticed while going live.

    I certainly take notes for competitions or if something of note happened during training.
     

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