dinosaur training?

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by HitmanNO.1, Aug 21, 2005.

  1. HitmanNO.1

    HitmanNO.1 Blue Belt

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    Ive read about it and it sounds like a good deal ( only like 20 bucks). Has anyone ever read it? How is it. I am a boxer/grappler who is into old world strenth training as opposed to bodybuilding.
     
  2. Urban

    Urban Savage Mystic

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    Define real world strength... and before you say it: functional strength is not an answer, it's another vague term.
     
  3. Tornado

    Tornado Blue Belt

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    I've read it and I have to say it's a great read for motivation and being introduced to ideas on how to combine odd lifts with barbell and dumbell exercises. The routines are simple (which isn't necessarily bad) and he preaches consistency and hard work. If you're looking to get 'functional', do your sport, get good at techniques and strengthen them through practice. If you're looking to build a stronger body that is strong in all directions and have fun training then dinosaur training will give you some great ideas.
     
  4. HitmanNO.1

    HitmanNO.1 Blue Belt

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    Ya i was a bit vague, i just dont want a program that will slow me down, which is why i combine weights w/ bodyweight to be more well rounded. By functional strength i meant being able to use my bodyweight easily like in pullup / pushup movements
     
  5. NEwrestler

    NEwrestler Red Belt

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    my favorite lifting book
     
  6. CarnalSalvation

    CarnalSalvation Trying to make a Milankey

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    So you want strength that's functional for doing push-ups and pull-ups eh? Perhaps you should do more pushups and pullups.

    Seriously dude, shell out that 20 bucks, I gurantee when you're done reading the book you'll be like half as retarded about weight lifting.
     
  7. Kingshit

    Kingshit White Belt

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    Its worth getting. It will give you a lot of good ideas, and motivate you for the pain ahead.
     
  8. JoeU1741

    JoeU1741 Yellow Belt

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    It's worth the buy, maybe check out e-bay or something to get it second hand. Pretty interesting ideas if you've taken your training down that road before. There is a lot to digest in it too though, so be careful of not trying to do everything at once.

    But like Urban said, be a little wary of this "functional strength" thing. I think it's just a current trendy term.
     
  9. Duncon76

    Duncon76 Blue Belt

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    Its the bible of strength training
     
  10. CarnalSalvation

    CarnalSalvation Trying to make a Milankey

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    What's funny about "functional strength" is it's a perenial trend. Sort of like how fashions cycle.

    Every so often people come out selling their product (whatever it may be, information, equipment, whatever) with the claim that it developes more "functional strength" than weights.

    I think as far as fighting strength goes, besides the obvious route of getting stronger with weights, the way to achieve what people think of as "functional strength" is really mostly in the hands/wrists.
     
  11. Urban

    Urban Savage Mystic

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    It seems to be an unpopular opinion but I agree. stronger lower arms and hands = more solid punch and more control on the ground. It's really undertrained in most combat athletes.
     
  12. CarnalSalvation

    CarnalSalvation Trying to make a Milankey

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    I noticed a huge increase in the ability to lift "odd objects" increased greatly after working my grip and lower arms hard.

    Same thing with my ability to move other people in a forcible fashion.
     
  13. Madmick

    Madmick Cerebrage Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    I think "functional strength" is a useful term, and I interpret it to mean: strength that can be applied (through the entire body) to particular movements in a given sport.

    My boss gave me an example. He trained an NFL lineman (I don't remember the name, I'll get it if you all want) who benched 550 pounds raw, which is very strong apparently even in the NFL, but whenever he went to throw a block on someone, he just pushed himself over backwards. The reason was his core wasn't conditioned, so he couldn't apply his upper body strength to a block because his hips, abdomen and lower back couldn't stabilize his body and produce enough counterforce to apply the intial force to an opponent.

    That being said, if you do all the so-called "supercore" lifts like squat, deadlift, clean, push press, snatch...and the staple "core" lifts like bench, military, pulldowns, pull-ups...as well as just not being lazy about your sit-ups...you shouldn't run into this problem.

    But I find functional strength a useful term because it indicates to an athlete that being strong in his sport probably entails being strong as a powerlifter, but being strong as a powerlifter doesn't necessarily entail being strong in his sport.
     
  14. CarnalSalvation

    CarnalSalvation Trying to make a Milankey

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    But I find functional strength a useful term because it indicates to an athlete that being strong in his sport probably entails being strong as a powerlifter, but being strong as a powerlifter doesn't necessarily entail being strong in his sport.

    I like what you're saying there, and I agree, I just think functional strength is maybe a bad term for it.

    My point is, you don't have to stand on a wobble board, carry sandbags, or anything else like that to have "fuctional" strength. Some of those things are good training tools, but they aren't necessary to apply your strength in the ring, on the field whatever.
     
  15. Madmick

    Madmick Cerebrage Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    True.

    I like the Bosu Balls (turn them upside down, they act as wobble boards) because you can use them for training some balance and ankle strength; I think they have less to do with "functional strength" (I desperately hope this word isn't evacuated of its meaning like most fad terms are) and more to do with preventing injury.

    I love the swiss/stability balls for the simple reason they'll turn a core lift- like the bench press- into a supercore lift. That doesn't mean I don't lift bench, because if I didn't, I'd be missing an opportunity to train my chest and shoulders with a heavier load, but I think the swiss balls are a necessary addition to just about any athlete's strength training.
     
  16. rippingrudy

    rippingrudy Guest

    I just saw a team quest training video where they do allot of old style training. Just look at how well couture moves and how strong he is!
     
  17. my big toe

    my big toe Yellow Belt

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    Swiss Balls are great, but I'm not so sold on the wobble board trainging. There was very interesting debate over at t-mag between coach Davies and Eric Cressey regarding the utililty of using wobble boards. I think Davies lost that battle, you can check it out here and judge for yourself. I'm no expert, but it seems like the risk of injury can be high.

    http://www.t-nation.com/readTopic.do?id=552432
     
  18. Urban

    Urban Savage Mystic

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    Shit, I heard they pulled that thread from t-mag before I got a chance to check it out! HAHA! Davies gets PWNED!
     
  19. CarnalSalvation

    CarnalSalvation Trying to make a Milankey

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    Here is "Coach" Davies developing some functional strength, just before he hops on his wobble board.

    [​IMG]

    Hey, and it ain't funny that the guy has to wear fairy clothes to train. His mom doesn't like him lifting weights, so he has to pretend he's playing pixie in his backyard to work out.
     
  20. my big toe

    my big toe Yellow Belt

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    LMFAO! It looks like he keeps his ball bag on his hips for saftey! Good tip.
     

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