Different training methods and tools?

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by Pugilistic, Jan 16, 2013.

  1. Pugilistic

    Pugilistic Silver Belt

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    Watching footage of various boxers, I realize that many gyms and trainers have different approaches to training and utilize different tools. I'm just wondering what advantages some of these methods and tools provide and if they make that much of a difference, why doesn't everybody use them? Obviously these tools exist for a reason but I'm curious to what those reasons are.

    Even with the usual mitts and bagwork, I don't quite get certain aspects. For example, does bagwork offer that much usefulness to top level fighters who can get a dedicated mitt holder? Why hit the bag if you can get a skilled guy to hold the mitts for you for numerous rounds every training session? The only advantage of bagwork over mitts I can distinguish is that the trainer can better see what the fighter is doing and the fighter can hit it harder without worrying about mittholder's hands.

    Then you get Mayweather Sr. who I have seen do mittwork with his barehands. What does this do?

    Then there are the various tools such as the punching shield


    What's the advantage of this over regular mitts? Same goes for trainers who use a towel or those foam sticks to work on their fighters' defense.

    You also have Floyd Mayweather who has his flashy looking mittwork routine with Roger (which obviously works) then practices going to the body by hitting a guy (forgot his name) wearing a body protector. Based on all the footage I've seen, Mayweather then seems to do the same thing on a bag, but why? Why not just do all your training on an actual moving person?

    I guess that's a lot of questions but I'm really curious and wondering if I'm missing out on something with my lack of dodging foam sticks or hitting a punching shield.
     
  2. bowlie

    bowlie Purple Belt

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    Its a progression. You will be taught a new combo on the pads, then drill it on a heavy bag, incorporate it into shadow boxing and then try to apply it in sparring
     
  3. Nuclearlandmine

    Nuclearlandmine Shreddin' Double Yellow Card

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    Eh, shouldn't that progression be from shadowboxing to heavy bag to pads to sparring?
     
  4. KarateStylist

    KarateStylist Yellow Card Yellow Card

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    Karate-traditionally goes (1) "stationary air punching," (2) "air punching in line," (3) 1-step {no contact}, (4) free-sparring, light to no contact..., (5) board-breaking...

    Many karateka insert Heavy Bag {stationary} after (1) & (2).

    Many karateka add focus mitt or kicking shield.... water filled target stand, etc. after (1). Full contacters or "knockdown" karate types do so @ (5).

    KarateStylist
     
  5. DivineComedy

    DivineComedy Green Belt

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    Different strokes for different folks, some places do it with contact first to teach the technique, and others do it with no contact first.
     
  6. Nuclearlandmine

    Nuclearlandmine Shreddin' Double Yellow Card

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    It seemed more logical to me to do no contact first then contact
     
  7. stangbanger

    stangbanger Purple Belt

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    I've always done pads, bag, and then shadow boxing/sparring. That's what makes sense to me. Learn step by step on the pads, drill it on the bag, incorporate it with footwork when shadow boxing, and then apply it in sparring.
     
  8. DivineComedy

    DivineComedy Green Belt

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    Some do it where they teach the technique first in the air, get the feeling of the body movement down first. Once comfortable there, you do it against pad stationary, then once that's down, pads with movement, then drilling it hard on the heavy bag, make it your own during shadow boxing, then apply it in sparring.

    Same as other schools of thought in regards to sparring. Some places have them spar the first day regardless of experience, other places, no sparring for 6 months or more. Just different approaches.
     
  9. sourdiesel209

    sourdiesel209 Green Belt

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    thats a very important step you dont wanna miss, unless you wanna be all theory and no action:D..
     
  10. stangbanger

    stangbanger Purple Belt

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    First day sparring? That's brutal.
     
  11. Pugilistic

    Pugilistic Silver Belt

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    I was never taught a combo on the pads. I've started doing mittwork a few months ago and I've been training for a few years. Each gym or trainer has a different progression program and I'm wondering what the logic is behind it.

    But why drill it at all on the bag? Why not keep drilling it on the pads/mitts assuming you're a career fighter who can afford a dedicated mittholder?

    It took quite a while for me to have my first sparring session at my gym and then several months after that for my second session. I thought that was just how the gym was until I later realized I could've sparred a lot earlier if I asked. Most people at my gym seem to spar 2-3 months into training.

    I guess another reason for a fighter to use a particular method/tool is if he feels good doing it and thinks that it works.
     
  12. stangbanger

    stangbanger Purple Belt

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    First day sparring? That's brutal.
     
  13. DivineComedy

    DivineComedy Green Belt

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    Placebo effect/belief can be very strong! It really depends on the student really. I teach my students the fundamentals first, before sparring, and that can range between 2 months to a year before a student may actually end up sparring. It took me about a year under my instructor before I could even put gloves on, granted that he wanted me to have textbook technique.

    It's more of a "Let's see what you got, where you at" kind of approach.
     
  14. 1Strike

    1Strike Blue Belt

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    In reality all coaching methods are only theory until a student of said coach applies them in sparring,competition or self defense situation.

    The coaches who rise to elite levels have proven that their theories work more often then other not so successful coaches as evidenced by the records of the fighters they produce.

    Mitt work is very important in my opinion to replicate an actual opponent because the mitt or pad holder can throw back at the fighter and have him counter punch as well. Bag is just as important because it allows a fighter to throw freestyle and full power and develop his own unique style and mix up his combos as well as the resistance a good heavy bag gives which helps develop power and endurance.

    As far the bare handed mitt work, I do this all time as do plenty of other boxing coaches. Basically it is a way to work offense and defense simultaneoulsy with a fighter. The mitts are not necessary when the fighter works his technique and not full power (though you can have them throw almost full speed and power on the "hand mitts").

    The Mayweather Jr mitt work is done more to work continuous reps of combos and counters and not power.

    The foam sticks I personally don't like and don't use because while they are okay for replicating arms and punches, they are not good targets to throw back at, but that is just my opinion..

    The circular punch shields are great to work specific punches for reps and power.
     
  15. PeterPain

    PeterPain Brown Belt

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    The guy in video has nuts protector for mit work.
     

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