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Difference Between Military Press and SOHP?

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by ExtremeStandard, Jul 25, 2010.

  1. ExtremeStandard

    ExtremeStandard Yellow Belt

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    I've searched everywhere, and have gotten some okay results but I just want to know the definitive difference between the two exercises.
     
  2. MMAPARADOX

    MMAPARADOX White Belt

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    Military press is feet next to each other
    Sohp is staggered stance
    I think
     
  3. MMAPARADOX

    MMAPARADOX White Belt

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  4. PowerHungry

    PowerHungry Oh yeah!

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    Military press is heels close together and feet at almost a 90 degree angle.
    SOHP (assuming we mean standing and strict) is whatever stance you want and also has no leg drive. But allows more back involvement if need.

    Here's military.

     
  5. ExtremeStandard

    ExtremeStandard Yellow Belt

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    thanks guys, the link and video helped now I have a much better idea greatly appreciated.
     
  6. VoodooPlata

    VoodooPlata Brown Belt

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    Is there a significant advantage to one over the other in any circumstance?
     
  7. spiral

    spiral Banned Banned

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    Military gives you less stability, so it's more taxing for the abs and lower back to stabilize the bar. Also, you can't use as much layback, so I guess it can remove some emphasis off your chest depending on your SOHP technique.

    SOHP allows you to handle more weight being more stable, while maintaining the need to stabilize the bar.

    If you wanted to take this one notch further to handle more weight, the next step would then be seated press. This should give you the right idea.
     
  8. glennpendlay

    glennpendlay Yellow Belt

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    In the real world, when someone says military press, you can be 99% sure that they are talking about an over head press without a knee kick to get it started, and without bending the knees to drop under it. just a shoulder and arm exercise. maybe 60 years ago it meant that the feet had to be in a certain position, but thats not the way people use the name today. the push press implies that you use a knee kick to get it started. "Olympic" press means that you use hip/back kick to get it started, then lean back to finish, but no knee bending. Anything overhead with the work "jerk" in it implies that you lowered yourself under it instead of finishing the press with just arm and shoulder power.
     
  9. spiral

    spiral Banned Banned

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    Glenn, you mean to say that my personal crusade to correct all the people who use "military" in the wrong way is meaningless? :redface:

    OT, but do you think one should get to a minimum (say, BW) with strict press before doing any kind of push press? Or should PP be used as assistance for strict press?
     
  10. glennpendlay

    glennpendlay Yellow Belt

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    nah, if your crusade is important to you, then have at it. technically, you are right. No reason why my opinion would be more important than yours, and you do have history on your side.

    But, here is my opinion. Yes, to be a true "military" press, at one time the heels had to touch. But I think that over time people in general just kind of agreed that all that heel and foot position stuff wasnt that big a deal. And that anything done standing up and without the aid of the lower body to start the lift or the bending of the knees or excessive bending at the waist to finish was a military press. I am fine with this, because I would never program an old school military press, and typing "Military press" or abbreviating "MP" is much easier than typping "standing overhead press" or abbreviating "SOHP".

    As much as we want to pay homage to our past, sometimes things just change. There was a time when calling someone gay meant that they were simply happy, and everyone knew this. But no matter how much one might like to do that today, we must now use another adjective if we want to convey the same meaning, and I dont think there is any going back. Time marches on. There was also a time when a certain way of getting a bar from the ground to the shoulders was called a "clean" because it got there cleanly, without contacting the body, as it did when one did a "continental" which involved resting the bar on your weight belt in the middle of the movement. Watch videos of modern weightlifters doing cleans and see how the manner of modern execution defies how the exercise was originally named. Again, time marches on.

    But by all means, continue with your quest if its what floats your boat. Maybe you will eventually make me type a few extra keystrokes every time I describe this particular exercise, along with giving a bit of respect for those of the past that did it in a slightly more difficult way. Nothing wrong with respect for the past.

    As far as your other question, I think you progress faster on the press if you also push press. I also think that the push press is the overall superior exercise, so Id rather think of the press as an assistance for the push press rather than the other way around.

    But some people pursue pressing numbers as an end unto itself... nothing wrong with that. And lots of good, IMO. Id much rather see people bragging about a big press than a big bench press. In that case, yeah, the push press is probably the best assistance exercise for the press in existence.
     
  11. pliftkl

    pliftkl Green Belt

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  12. zx

    zx adventurer

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    Why is that?

    Must say that I totaly agree with you, but this is benchmonsters forum, your finger is sticked in someone's eye.
     
  13. Oblivian

    Oblivian Aging Platinum Member

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    I sometimes just refer to my Push Press as "Overhead" to avoid any confusion. By Glenn's definitions, it's some sort of hybrid of a Push Press and Olympic Press. I definitely use knee kick, but I think I lean back as well and my feet may even leave the ground for a split second. It can definitely be confusing classifying all of the overhead work.
     
  14. spiral

    spiral Banned Banned

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    I was joking, it's not that important to me. However, I do avoid to use the "military" terminology. I prefer Rippetoe's name for it, calling it simply the press.

    Ok then, what kind of rep. range would you recommend? If asked, I'd go for 5 sets of 3 reps after my normal press workout, kinda the same as I do with 5 sets of 3 front squats after my squat workout. Would it be sensible?

    And thanks for your answers. It's awesome to have you here.
     
  15. glennpendlay

    glennpendlay Yellow Belt

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    If your using knee kick, its a push press
     
  16. glennpendlay

    glennpendlay Yellow Belt

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    I would do the two on different days, 5 triples is a decent place to start though.
     

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