Developing a Game

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by RetardControl, Apr 21, 2008.

  1. RetardControl White Belt

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    So I'm pretty new to BJJ and I hear people talk alot about developing your own game. Working on the same few moves that you find work well for you over and over until you know all the set ups and how to transitition when someone counters. In theory, it all sounds great. It sounds like the perfect way to grow as a BJJ practicioner. In reality, I find it to be somewhat different.

    I find that with being "the new guy" that I'm not able to work anything... anything at all. I find I 'm getting stuck on my back alot less, so I'm obviously becoming better with position as escapes, but submissions still seem a far way away. When newer guys come in I find I can dominate them position wise and finish a few submissions, but surely that's meaningless?

    What material do you look for when you build a game? Surely all the moves that are being taught in class are the ones you're never going to catch people with because everyone knows them and knows how to defend them? But then if you're looking to DVD's, you've not been taught them so you're probably going to develop bad habits from learning yourself? I'm starting to think that maybe I just don't "get" BJJ.

    Any advice for a frustrated newbie? :)
     
  2. TalkShowOnMute dancingonthecorpsesashes

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    I'm not sure of the exact question, but to "build a game" you have to log hours and hours on the mat, until things smooth out...techniques become your techniques..you will naturally have go-to moves..etc. You can't help but to build your own game..no two styles are identical. I know guys who tear everyone up with their spiderguard...others with rubberguard...others who beat everyone with basic day one stuff...what's the difference between the three guys? Nothing really...they found what worked for them and did it over and over and over and over.......






    and over.
     
  3. ZakS White Belt

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    you are doing exactly what you should be doing right now. don't worry about 'getting the tap'. right now you should be just rolling and trying to survive and getting out of bad positions and into better ones.

    read through this it is a great read and helps explain/confirm things about where you are and what you should be doing http://aliveness101.blogspot.com/2007/02/exploring-map.html
     
  4. andrewbc Purple Belt

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    find one submission, one take down and one sweep. thse three moves will be your game. all the other techniques you learn will supplement these three moves. use some wrestling techniques to defend your opponenets take down and tranisition into your own take down. threaten with submissions to set up your go to sweep. use other submission to set up your finishing submission. etc etc
     
  5. wOg Burien Top Team

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    I tend to think that "your game" will find you. I know there are a lot things I've tried to make "my game"--from traditional closed guard Roger Gracie stuff to Marcelo Garcia arm drags and X-guards. None of that stuck.

    As a newbie, the most important things are:
    1. Learn escapes. Learn one good technical escape from every bad position (crossbody, mount, rear mount). Practice them religiously every chance you get. You will be SO glad you did.

    2. Learn to defend your guard. Having a guard that is difficult to pass is jiu jitsu's greatest blessing, IMO.

    3. Pay attention to whatever you see start to work for you on the mat. Be prepared to be surprised. Chances are, it will be your fledgling jiu jitsu game trying to tell you something.
     
  6. Technomad White Belt

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    Your game will grow as you grow a fighter. For example, I am a triangle guy. I rarley get the finish, but if I can lock it in, then no matter what reaction he gives me, I have a follow-up move. depending on his reaction he could see: omoplata, armbar, gogoplata, bolt lock, teepee, or highguard americana. What makes a "game" not just a seris of moves is that each one complements the other, and if your opponent fights one move, he is walking himself into another.
     

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