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Deadlift Rep Question

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by SpiralOut, Sep 17, 2010.

  1. SpiralOut Yellow Belt

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    So, the T Nation article on Pulls in the FAQ recommends training single reps only, for multiple sets (mistake #7, T NATION | Dead Zone).

    But most other training plans, especially for newbs, usually advise 3 or 5 reps for a much lower number of sets. And now I don't know exactly how to tackle DLs.

    Perhaps when you reach a certain level of proficiency & strength, it is advisable to switch to single reps? Something akin to where you start off back-squatting and DL'ing on the same day till you hit some serious work, and then move on to alternate the two (assuming a two day split)?

    I'd particularly like to hear from anyone who has trained multiple sets of single reps on the Pull. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Big H Blue Belt

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    I think either Wendler or Tate recommended doing high reps as much as 10 sometimes to help grip strength.
     
  3. Oblivian Aging Platinum Member

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    I got my Deadlift up to 475 lbs only working singles. I've heard many others say they got their Deadlift up pretty high with singles only as well. I did stall for a LONG time after that, and now I'm incorporating in sets of 5. I've started to make gains again switching between singles one week and sets of 5 the other.

    I think both are valid. The key is to keep adding weight and/or more reps for overload. I think you'll eventually stall if you don't change your reps up, but I always like to do singles at least every other week.
     
  4. PCP Guest

    Training to a 1RM with deadlift variations and pushing up your accessory work is the fastest way to get strong at that lift. I haven't pulled over 3 reps in years.
     
  5. symphonyx547** Purple Belt

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    I got mine from 475 to 525 in a pretty short period of time doing sets of 10-12 only. Never below 10. I seem to get the best gains with higher rep. The way i look at it is as long as whatever your repping for whatever amount of reps your doing is increasing so is your max.
     
  6. otnemeM Blue Belt

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    What's your goal exactly?
     
  7. VoodooPlata Brown Belt

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    I think doing deadlifts will help you no matter how you do them. But i would advise lower reps.
     
  8. big_john127 Profess¡onal Lurker

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    A big part of the rationale behind doing single reps only is that it's really hard to keep your form good for the whole set. I like doing sets of singles.
     
  9. pliftkl Green Belt

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    I like to think of any set of deadlifts as a collection of singles. Thinking about it that way ensures that I properly reset after each rep. If I don't do this, I tend to not drop my hips as low as I should.
     
  10. SpiralOut Yellow Belt

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    I don't know I have an "exact" goal. I said I'd like to pull 600 pounds within a decade, but that was in casual conversation with someone. Really, just to keep getting stronger across the board, to lift more than I used to be able to.
     
  11. Morganation Brown Belt

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    Im having success doing singles so thats what I recommend.
     
  12. PCP Guest

    If you get your weight up you should be able to hit 600 within 3-5 years of training.
     
  13. Keosawa Black Belt

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    My work sets almost never extend beyond five repetitions, but I treat all my non-one repetition work sets as a series of closely placed singles. By that, I mean that if I'm working at 80% my 1RM for a set of five, I'll reset fully (though I'll usually keep my hands on the bar and not try to readjust my grip) and take five seconds before pulling again. It helps, I personally feel, avoid form breakdown by going through the same starting process again and again, even within the same set. A similar approach would be to implement 30-second rest period intervals. I've done both of these, with varying success.

    I think only singles can be helpful, but I sometimes feel like my form gets too sloppy as a result of that method.
     
  14. otnemeM Blue Belt

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    Well, I don't know many trainers who advise on working solely with 1RM, nor do any of my friends who compete in powerlifting. More reps give you more maneuverability for progress. With 1RM you'll only be able to progress by weight on bar.
    I'd rather go with a planned progression method (as there are many) than just go with "generally going balls to the wall on max every time". There's Sheiko, there's Wendler's 531, there's WS's, etc.
     

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