Deadlift Form Check

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by Ethan, Jun 6, 2014.

  1. Ethan

    Ethan Green Belt

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    My deadlift PR is 10lbs heavier than my squat PR. This seems off to me, so here's a form check. Off the bat, my lower back looks a little rounded. I've never had any pain there after deadlifting, so I'm a bit surprised at that.

    2 sets of 5 at 245lbs.

    [YT]sfv146lp0eM[/YT]

    Second set.

    [YT]5e1ax591jcg[/YT]

    Thanks gents.
     
  2. Oblivian

    Oblivian Aging Platinum Member

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    I'm definitely not the most technical deadlifter so I have trouble articulating advice, but I noticed your positioning can vary on reps. I noticed on your first rep of the second video that your head and shoulders get shot out in front of the bar quite a bit. My guess is your weight is transferring to your toes and you aren't staying back. It could be that you just started with the bar too close to your shins on that rep. The reps after look a bit better, but you can tell that you are getting thrusted forward a bit and you are trying to fight it off.

    I've had similar issues, and I constantly have to think of pulling back. To me, the deadlift is a battle of being able to keep my chest up and not get folded. My hips always want to rise quick and fold me over, so I focus on my upper body. Not sure if this applies to you or not, but you can probably tell if you feel like the weight is transferring to your toes and you are getting folded.
     
  3. Ethan

    Ethan Green Belt

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    Good input, thanks Oblivian. I think I'm definitely getting pulled forward a fair amount.
     
  4. S1Z

    S1Z yoked.

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    Oblivion pretty much nailed it, great advice.

    All I have to offer would be keep your chin high and almost imagine like your goal is to get the back of your head behind your heels as soon as possible. It might be weird unorthodox advice but it would help with the issue of you being 'pulled forward'

    Gotta admit it was a pretty bad camera angle considering the upper half of the lift is essentially cut from our view. For the amount of weight on the bar the lower lumbar arch seems SLIGHTLY rounded but I'd be a major hypocrite to scold you for that. Everytime I pull over 4 plates I do the exact same thing.
     
  5. Tosa

    Tosa Red Belt

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    You're getting pulled forward because you're too forward overall - you're squatting down, and your knees are too far forward. The bar has to shift forward to clear the knees.

    Get the hips back more, so the shins stay more vertical. I find it helps to get set-up with high hips, and then sink my hips down and back until there's a lot of tension on the bar. Then I pull.
     
  6. DrBdan

    DrBdan Something clever

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    I'm the same as Tosa. I use the bar to pull myself down into a tight position. If I think about squatting down too much I end up with the bar out in front of me.
     
  7. Ethan

    Ethan Green Belt

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    Seems like I need to go backwards more, most of all.

    Thanks gents. Will try and report back next Friday.
     
  8. magick

    magick Green Belt

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    Push the floor away, not pull with your body.

    Your upper body, once it gets into position, should pretty much stay in that position the entire time. The only thing that moves is your lower body. The act of pushing your hips out at lock-out is supposed to be what gets your body straight, not pulling back with your upper and/or lower back, for example.
     
  9. National Acrobat

    National Acrobat Superstitious Century, Didn't Time Go Slow?

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    To piggy back on Tosa and DrBdan your starting with too upright of a position and your hips too low. You can tell because your hips consistently rise before the bar moves. So you start pulling from a disadvantaged position and the bar isn;t moving until you get in the proper starting spot (hips high, back more horizontal, shins more vertical)
     
  10. Ethan

    Ethan Green Belt

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    So it seems like the consensus is that I squat into the setup when I should be sitting back into the setup.

    I will post a video on Friday and see if I've fixed that issue.
     
  11. S1Z

    S1Z yoked.

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    magicks advice of pushing the floor away is the feeling I was hoping to describe lol

    clearly I failed but this is good advice
     
  12. JauntyAngle

    JauntyAngle International man of mystery

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    Is that what people are saying? I think they are saying that you are too far forward of the bar- you need to start further behind the bar and focus on pulling back.

    How you get into the correct position to DL is up to you. You can bend down and take the bar, then lower your hips if your back is bent, or you can squat down and take the bar, then raise your hips as high as you like as long as you don't bend your back. Either way, you want to be somewhat behind the bar in your initial position. Hip height isn't a totally cut and dried issue. AFAIK some good deadlifters start lower than others- lower starting position just transfers the effort away from glutes, hams and lower back towards quads. But if you want to start lower, you need to make sure you are actually pulling from that position, and not shooting up to a higher position as soon as you exert yourself.

    BTW, there is something weird about your movement I can't quite put my finger on. I don't think I see separation of the two stages: first stage; get into position, raise the bar to the knees while maintaining the back angle; second stage, finish the lift by "humping the bar" (powerfully pushing hips through). Because the camera is set so low I can't see what position you are in when the bar is at your knees, but it seems like somehow you are just standing up from there, rather than humping the bar.
     
  13. magick

    magick Green Belt

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    What you should do is post a video of you doing a heavy set and a set of TnG at 245, since the weight is obviously light for you.
     
  14. JauntyAngle

    JauntyAngle International man of mystery

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    And camera a bit higher, so people can see your back angle too.
     
  15. Ethan

    Ethan Green Belt

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    No, no one says it, but I'm reasonably sure everything you outlined can be traced back to the way I set up. If I grip up and then sit back, I think that should force me back away from the bar and give me enough space to hump the bar to finish.

    I need to figure out a better way to film lifting in the work gym.
     
  16. magick

    magick Green Belt

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    I would say don't think of sitting back, but rather pull the bar to you while you grip it. This will naturally have you sit back and bring the bar closer to your body. The key is that your entire hip should already be engaged. This is why deadlifting with a circle plate is much easier than deadlifting with a hexagonal plate. As you're bringing the weight to you, your entire upper back is already engaged and tight and your entire hip structure is tensing and already exerting force onto the bar.

    You're essentially applying upward force to the bar as you bring it closer and closer to your shins, simply by virtue of getting your body into position. When the weight is where it should be, you simply release said tension in the hip structure and PUSH the floor as hard as you can.

    Done properly, easy weight such as 135 should be off the floor and flying up by the time you already reach your shin, simply due to the fact that your hip structure is applying sufficient force.

    I may have misused physics terms here, but hopefully I got the point across.

    But there's a reason why deadlifting with circle plates is far more preferable than with hexagonal plates. Shit like this isn't possible with a hexagonal plate.
     
  17. JauntyAngle

    JauntyAngle International man of mystery

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    The setup does sound awesome- I want to try it myself. But with such a comparatively light weight it ought to be possible to pull correctly without it.
     
  18. Ethan

    Ethan Green Belt

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    I'm hoping to use it as a teaching tool, mostly. Setting up right might help the motor pattern get ingrained into my head. At least, I hope.

    I'm also going to video squats tomorrow for you guys to take a look at. I'm happy with my squatting right now but second opinions can't hurt.
     
  19. Ethan

    Ethan Green Belt

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    Alright. I pulled last Friday and the form adjustments made a huge difference. My phone camera is broken but I will get video soon. My hamstrings actually hurt Saturday and Sunday so I'm hoping that's good.
     
  20. magick

    magick Green Belt

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    It's a good thing if you can actually feel your hamstrings doing things in the deadlift.
     

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