Dairy products/Bone density

Discussion in 'Dieting / Supplement Discussion' started by Fenderson, Aug 23, 2015.

  1. Fenderson

    Fenderson Purple Belt

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    Is there any evidence or studies that show conclusive evidence whether dairy products are good/bad for bone density? I keep reading conflicting reports.

    Weve all been told about how milk has lots of calcium and how its great for bones, but im not sure whether this is old news.

    I drink alot of whole milk its my favourite beverage. I also eat greek yoghurt everyday. I love dairy products. I just wanted to know if consuming so much is a smart choice, espically when it comes to bone health.

    Thanks.
     
  2. the can

    the can fat guy belt

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    not knowing anything about the subject, other than observation, every adult i can think of (with one exception) who drinks milk regularly has out of control mucous and comes across as very unhealthy (be it from bloated or scrawny).

    do you have excessive mucous? would you come off as unhealthy? 100% chance you can find conflicting information about any subject you can think of on the net.

    out of curiosity... why are you concerned with bone density health?
     
  3. T20o6

    T20o6 White Belt

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  4. EGarrett

    EGarrett Silver Belt

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    I've been doing a GOMAD diet with my training, gained about 15 pounds off of it so far and my veins are still visible. No side effects at all except that I'm sick of pissing so often.
     
  5. KhabibTheBeagle

    KhabibTheBeagle Papi de la Sherdog

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    I don't like having veins visible, it makes me an easy target for vampires
     
  6. Fenderson

    Fenderson Purple Belt

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    its strange you mention that youve associated milk with scrawny people. Bodybuilders/powerlifters have used milk for decades to put on muscle. GOMAD being an example of this. Ive never personally suffered with excess mucus. I would say that I was a decent athlete all round as well.

    Im an mma fighter and just want to cover all health bases to prevent injury.
     
    Last edited: Aug 23, 2015
  7. Fenderson

    Fenderson Purple Belt

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  8. $uicideboy$

    $uicideboy$ ROPE GANG Banned

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    apparently us milk is shitty compared to eu milk

    i dunno tho
     
  9. the can

    the can fat guy belt

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    2 people in particular i know are scrawny milkerz. most are plump. the scrawny ones are very unhealthy people. mucous out the yin-yang, no muscle tone, questionable mental capacity... could just be them as people.
     
  10. EGarrett

    EGarrett Silver Belt

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    Just talking about the ratio of fat gains to muscle gains.
     
  11. KhabibTheBeagle

    KhabibTheBeagle Papi de la Sherdog

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    I know, I was only kidding. Inappropriate?
     
  12. SummerStriker

    SummerStriker Black Belt

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    According to my Human Physiology 201 professor back in college (who I asked about this very thing to), it matters mostly on how old you are and how you are taking it.

    According to her, children will deposit calcium and other minerals they take in excess, including those from milk, and deposit them into their bones. Children can get harder bones by drinking milk and doing nothing else.

    Adults on the other hand will piss excess calcium their body isn't using. All available calcium in an adults diet is used in the blood for muscle contraction and little else. If the body is not asking for calcium, any extra above what is needed to maintain blood levels will be wasted.

    According to her, adults only undergo bone growth in response to stress. Weight lifting and running are the two main causes of bone growth. If you want healthier and stronger bones, you have to work out. That calcium drains off the blood level, so you have to eat and drink more calcium.

    Here is the catch - if the diet doesn't contain regular calcium, when the blood level falls off, the body will leach the minerals it needs for the heart and muscles back out of the bones.

    That means that adults need to eat a balanced diet that takes in calcium regularly and lift weights and do cardio.
     
  13. Fenderson

    Fenderson Purple Belt

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    Very interesting. The one thing ive never really known though is when you mention increasing bone density from running, heavy weights.

    Does the increase in bone density only occur in the bones that are loaded? (eg the legs when running, heavy squatting). Or does the body respond by increasing bone density throughtout the whole body. Id presume it was the first one.
     
  14. Badger67

    Badger67 Taxidea taxus

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    Dairy is fine unless you have any allergies.

    Humans will piss out any extra vitamins we don't need. This is why some supplements are useless and futile.
    There is a lot that goes into calcium absorption for bones, such as vitamin D3, K2 and saturated fat content, but this would take up its own thread.

    Loaded is going to be the most bang for your buck, but any form of stress to the bones that does not create stress/micro fractures is going to be sufficient. Running can help, but not to the extent lifting heavy objects can.
    As the tendons pull on the bones or as the bones are loaded axially/horizontally/unilaterally etc they respond to the stress producing more osteoblasts than osteoclasts and this in turn helps repair and build stronger bones. (This is a very simple explanation just to get the jist out).

    For those looking at osteoporosis rates when consuming dairy, look at highest bone density rates to contrast it. You will be surprised.

    Dairy isnt necessary, but if you enjoy it and don't experience any negatives, go for it.
     
  15. Fenderson

    Fenderson Purple Belt

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    Thanks for the info. I think im covering all the bases. I squat twice a week and run three times and my diets exceptional most of the time. Thanks again.
     
  16. TheFinerDetails

    TheFinerDetails Orange Belt

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    Bodybuilders didn't drink milk to put on "muscle". That's a sort of misleading statement.
    Full cream milk has a mass amount of calories (250 per glass I think?) and replacing your water intake (2L a day probably) with milk, gives you a 2000 calorie diet, without any meals.
    It's the same as the original types of steroids, they were used simply to put on MASS, where they believed that if they were putting on FAT then they DEFINITELY were reaching their maximum muscle gain.
    They also stripped back their milk intake if they were noticeably putting on pounds of fat. These guys aren't just animals that take in 8000kcal a day and don't get fat. Don't ever forget, we only see the highlights and the 8 weeks of the year where the BB's are shredding for competition.

    To the original post; too much calcium can apparently block the intake of other essential vitamins and minerals. It takes precedence over the other essentials, higher affinity of some sort. I'd honestly look at trying to sort out a balanced diet with all your essentials, rather than just the calcium. An athlete doesn't even need that much more calcium than a regular person (if any extra).
     
  17. gspieler

    gspieler Silver Belt

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    Increases in bone density are largely specific to the bone tissue receiving the additional stress. Going to bed and not going to bother citing sources, so take with grain of salt if you like. But studies have been done comparing bone density in arms, spine, hips, legs, etc between athletes in various sports, and compared them to untrained individuals. The results basically showed that increases in bone density/mass were localized, eg runners saw an increase in bone density in legs/hips, but not in the arms. Cyclists actually had slightly less bone density in the legs iirc, but slightly greater in the arms. Gymnasts had A-level bone density everywhere. Etc, etc, etc.
     
  18. Beechwood

    Beechwood Green Belt

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    I recall this study article on fracture risk, drinking milk and taking calcium. It didn't find either helpful with preventing bone fractures, and even increased risk.

    "Milk and calcium good for the bones? Don
     
  19. These Two Hands

    These Two Hands Our revenge will be the laughter of our children

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    I've been told that beers are pretty good for calcium supplementation. I like drinking Belgian saison due to the added B vitamins and folates from the yeast.
     
  20. Badger67

    Badger67 Taxidea taxus

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