Critique my sparring

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by James Smith, Sep 24, 2013.

  1. James Smith

    James Smith Amateur Fighter

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    Last edited: Sep 24, 2013
  2. Wolveswithkeys

    Wolveswithkeys something awful

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    which one is you?
     
  3. James Smith

    James Smith Amateur Fighter

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    Thanks, knew I forgot something
     
  4. Wolveswithkeys

    Wolveswithkeys something awful

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    Well my critique will depend what exactly you're training for: MMA or Muay Thai?

    One thing that's a problem regardless is your chin comes up a lot when you start throwing strikes.
     
  5. James Smith

    James Smith Amateur Fighter

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    Mma, and Yea that's a problem that I have been working on
     
  6. Wolveswithkeys

    Wolveswithkeys something awful

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    Alright your stance is pretty good for MMA then.

    Some quick points:

    - I can see your rear leg kick coming every time before you throw it. Now because of your wider and lower stance, it's harder to fire that kick off quickly. But work out not telegraphing it so much with a big load up.

    - You also throw a lot of fancy kicks that don't really have a whole lot on them and leave you in awkward positions. In MMA any wrestler worth his salt is going to wait for you to try one of those things and take you right down.

    - You're very bouncy. There's nothing wrong with that while you're moving around the ring, but you seem to keep it up while you're throwing strikes. Doing this doesn't really allow you to sit on any of your punches or kicks. I realize this wasn't super hard sparring, but you should still practice good form and work your combos correctly. In fact light sparring is an even better time to practice really stringing strikes together, because you don't have to worry about getting your clock cleaned when your combo gets interrupted. Which leads me to my next point...

    - Throw longer combos. And throw them faster. Again I know this wasn't hard sparring, but you can still maintain quickness. You're throwing one or two strikes and then you're out. MMA isn't point karate. Work some combos. Jab, jab, cross, rear leg kick. Cross, hook, leg kick. Jab, jab, cross, body shot. Etc. I come from a Muay Thai background so I don't have the risk of getting interrupted by a takedown like in MMA, but it's still good to practice these things in training. When we do pad work we'll work a drill that's up to 12 counts sometimes. I'll never be able to land 12 shots in a row in a live fight unless I'm fighting an idiot, but I train combos that long so when the time comes to put it to work, it's natural for me to land as many hits as I can and not just move out after a couple.

    - Quit pawing with that lead hand so much. A good striker is going to spot that pretty fast and wait for it. Something hard is going to come sailing right over it and knock you out.

    - Don't wear those pants anymore dude.
     
  7. James Smith

    James Smith Amateur Fighter

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    Thanks man the advice is much appreciared. As for the combos thing i was working with one hand so it made it pretty hard but yeah longer combos ill work on that. I actually dont come from a karate background or anything im a wrestler turned mma fighter and thats just how my striking developed.
     
  8. Wolveswithkeys

    Wolveswithkeys something awful

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    Well you coming from a wrestling background could solve the getting taken down problem I mentioned. I'm sure you have a pretty decent td defense.
     
  9. James Smith

    James Smith Amateur Fighter

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    Yup, I get taken down very rarely. Plus im comfortable of my back to. But I get punched in the face allot though .
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2013
  10. apizur**

    apizur** Aggressive Finesse.

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    [.y.t.] f7uCCJYJQxI [./.y.t.] with no spaces or periods =


    and

     
  11. apizur**

    apizur** Aggressive Finesse.

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    You're tentative. I know he's got power from the looks of things, but he was also tired in the 2nd round. You're throw one strike at a time because you're apprehensive to engage. He's throwing one strike at a time because he's tired and you're letting him get away with it. Don't get nervous when you get close to him, sometimes it's cool just to throw a couple strikes and wait to see what he does next. Either way, the pocket is your friend.

    This is your offense:
    Paw with the jab (not serious jab), if you can get close enough, throw the left, if he backs out throw a kick before he's entirely out of range.
    Occasionally you'd throw a different kick in there, like that hook kick to the body, which was good.
    Try to mix up your offense a little, and push him BACK. You're a southpaw, you can circle to your right, put him in front of your power, and get out of the way of his.

    Also,
    gal pon de back an she a boom boom boom boom
     
    Last edited: Sep 25, 2013
  12. a guy

    a guy Black Belt

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    You're definitely skilled. You throw with good technique, move well and I'm a fan of your active lead hand as a southpaw.

    What you need to work on is settling in a bit closer. A lot of the time you were trying to cover too much distance to land your kicks and it made them easy to see and defend. If instead of resting a step out of range, you rest JUST outside the edge of his reach, your set ups will be much more effective. Speaking of setups, that's another thing that needs work. You don't really have much set up beyond pawing with the jab and firing the kick. You need something to hide them better, whether it be feints, punches, something tricky like Brazilian kicks, whatever. Just anything to make them harder to read. You are very good at making an opponent move into your kicks though, which is great. It forces them to block, but with more advanced setups you could get them walking into kicks that they don't see in time to defend.

    Also, you have the typical problem 90% of kickers have when you punch; standing too tall. Bend your knees a little more, get some leverage and connection to the ground. It's ok to punch from a taller stance, but you're best off only doing that to set up kicks. It's difficult, but if you can lower or raise your stance based on range and what you're attacking with, your game will be much better. This is the biggest thing people struggle with when trying to combine punches and kicks. I would personally like to see you engage a bit more, like apizur was saying. I'm not sure how much of your decision to almost purely kick was based on the injured hand but the amount of kicks you were throwing from the range you were throwing them at is making it more likely you'll get them caught or timed and countered with a takedown.
     
  13. ALE

    ALE Purple Belt

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    I didn't know the spider had a sherdog account :)
     
  14. hell wall

    hell wall Blue Belt

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  15. 1 2 3

    1 2 3 White Belt

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    Props for putting your video up.

    So, here's my critique:

    1. You seem light on your feet, and you seem like you move really easily. That's really good. I would try to keep that.

    2. You've got a pretty nice side kick, there. Now, he mostly got out of the way of it, but that doesn't mean it doesn't have value. You might just not be throwing it at the right times, not setting it up, or telegraphing sometimes...something like that.

    3. You're flexible and quick enough to throw a variety of kicks at every height. I saw some hook kicks, some roundhouses, some teeps...great.

    now, the flip side:

    4. Not so much with the combinations. You look like you want to throw multiple punches, but like you're having trouble getting them off.

    5. Punches in general. Not as strong as your kicks.

    6. Defense. Even worse than the punches. (Not trying to be a jerk, but that's what I saw.)

    7. Not a lot in the way of lateral movement.

    8. Control of distance. Even though you've got good mobility, you were hardly ever in the lead. He wasn't consistently in the lead, either, but we're talking about you. If he asks, we'll talk about him later.

    You've got to do a better job of controlling the pace and distance of the engagement. With your abilities, you should be able to decide when the two of you are going to engage, and when you're not. But, in order to do that, you're going to have to move in and out more decisively, and you're also going to have to make your defensive movement better. By better, I mean you're going to have to learn to pivot away from his attack, sidestep or even (gasp) slip and duck his strikes, rather than back straight up, or lean your head back.

    Now maybe you felt like you had to engage at some times that weren't always the best. It kind of looked like he waited for you to throw something so he could counter, especially toward the end. Maybe this was just practice and you didn't want to wait--or maybe you just need work creating offense.

    And about that--creating offense, I mean--don't wade in slowly while leaning your head back because you're afraid you're about to get hit. That's a rookie mistake. If you're gonna get hit if you throw that punch, don't throw that punch. You go in fast, with your head tucked close to your shoulder, and you're faster, less likely to get hit, and you get hurt less even if you do. If the opening's there, or if your first punch can CREATE the opening...BOOMBOOMBOOM--you fire off the combination without hesitation. YOU fill up the space. If you work at it, the act of throwing a punch will even cause your head to move sideways into a better defensive position, anyway. You've probably got to do some slower drills to get used to slipping or moving your head off the line of his attack as you attack. And maybe even try to force yourself to slip or duck some punches in light sparring. Plus, it's easier to go in confidently when you've created an opening for yourself with a feint, or stepping quickly to the side, then attacking while he adjusts. And, you don't always even have to be moving forward to create offense. If you can react well enough to what he's doing, an opponent is always most vulnerable when HE's throwing a strike. And, you can anticipate or bait him to throw the kind of strike you know you have a good reaction to.

    One last thing: when you do decide to go in, you don't have to JUMP in. In striking arts, smaller steps are generally better than taking big steps. And keeping your feet closer to the ground when you move is better than jumping or lifting them way up (unless you're checking or kicking with that leg, obviously). You can start your attack from JUST outside of his range, and then take a little step in, and then back out. Or better yet pivot out. Or even step out not in the same direction you came, or even end on a kick or push him and then kick him again... whatever.

    Good luck and post again when you've had a chance to try what you wanted.
     
  16. 1 2 3

    1 2 3 White Belt

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    Aaaaaannnd I took too long writing, and now some of my post is redundant to a guy's.
     
  17. James Smith

    James Smith Amateur Fighter

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    Allot of great advice here, thanks allot to everyone who took the time to watch my vids and post a critique. I do consider myself to be a kicker but I honestly ly felt limited not being able to throw a left hand. I'l happi ly put up another video but probably not until after my hand has healed up and I get a chance to work on everything.

    Sure I don't mind I have a grappling competition on Saturday so I will prob ably post my matches.
     
  18. James Smith

    James Smith Amateur Fighter

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    Allot of great advice here, thanks allot to everyone who took the time to watch my vids and post a critique. I do consider myself to be a kicker but I honestly ly felt limited not being able to throw a left hand. I'l happi ly put up another video but probably not until after my hand has healed up and I get a chance to work on everything.

    Sure I don't mind I have a grappling competition on Saturday so I will prob ably post my matches.
     
  19. Leaning back with chin up

    Jab with authority. He was ignoring it because you were just pawing it in.

    U look like Floyd money spider silva. Lose the gay pants though. Unless you are gay, nothing wrong with that.
     
  20. James Smith

    James Smith Amateur Fighter

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    Nah not gay, the pants are just awesome
     

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