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Critique my Fights... (NAGA DC 2010)

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by DutchMafia, Sep 26, 2010.

  1. DutchMafia

    DutchMafia Orange Belt

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    Looking for some constructive comments on my fights at NAGA DC this weekend. I’ll link two of my fights below.

    A few thoughts of my own:
    - Need to work transitions between positions

    - Need to really focus on securing positions and getting points.

    - Cutting gradually over 2 months was much easier than cutting water and food in
    the last two weeks, felt better.

    - Cardio was hurting despite having put myself through 5 weeks of intense circuit
    training, nothing can match a full on 5 minute intense grappling session.

    First Fight – No-Gi Masters 205-225 Intermediate – No one showed up in my class so I dropped down to fight in the No-Gi Adult 205-225 Intermediate. Having only done BJJ for 18 months I felt a little outclassed. I don’t mind being mounted but this guy was simply digging his fight into my throat in an attempt to get me to submit. It hurt a lot but in reality it just pissed me off.

    Second Fight – Gi Masters 225+ - Again no one showed up in my weight class so I got bumped up to Superheavy Weight this time. I hit my favorite throw, sumi gaeshi, and you’ll see I got mounted but spun out. My game plan was to mount, get points then move into kesa gatame. I was nervous I spun off mount way to quick without getting points and it was all downhill from there. In retrospect I need to seek out heavier training partners, I’m not used to heavier guys than me. I have a new respect for the little guys I roll with now.
     
  2. Balto

    Balto Silver Belt

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    From your gi match:

    - The sumi gaeshi was really smooth. You hit that just about perfectly. Good job.

    - You should have probably waited a little longer before going for the mount. Wear him down from the kesagatame pin before you advance. There is plenty of time here.

    - I'd put the near hook in first at 1:28. Since you put the far hook in first, you trapped your leg when you pulled him back. That helped him escape.

    - It looks like you start getting tired for the rest of the match. You did mention that cardio was a factor up above, so I assume that was what happened.

    The best advice I could give here is just relax some and try to calm your nerves. You both looked pretty nervous in the match, but his nervousness seemed to win out here. With time you'll be able to keep a cool head, not get gassed, and handle such an opponent.

    For 18 months I thought you looked pretty good. Things will get smoother with time. You will learn to take your sweet time and march through the match at the right pace picking up points along the way.

    Good luck bro.
     
  3. lacgoal

    lacgoal White Belt

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    NOGI: theres a possible setup into the triangle when the guy had his arm in between your legs. you've got long legs so it shouldn't be too hard to hook it up. Push the head back towards your legs and lock it up and pull the arm thats through toward you. Also if this doesn't work, its better to keep your feet on the gound and not in the air, because then you can frame under his chin and work to get your hips out when the chance comes up. Once he got mount, and stucj his arm under your neck, he's trapping himself and setting you up for an upa escape. But if that doesn't work, anytime some one has mount, try to keep your arms on your chest to start working towards your escapes, elbow knee, whatever. having your arm around his body is just putting you in a bad spot to be armbarred or whatever. Then once you got halfguard, you did the leg straighten out thing again, get the arms between you and him, then get your hips out towards the side you have halfguard. Getting your hands inside can help you to frame, trhen make space, so then you have space to work with,.
    Nice catch at the end with teh heelhook.
     
  4. Wandgun

    Wandgun Orange Belt

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    What was the guy complaining about at the end of the no-gi match? Also, what are the rules if you wears shoes? Is he limited on what he can do submission wise based on rules while wearing shoes?
     
  5. ajf

    ajf Orange Belt

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    Just watched your gi fight. For a blue belt you need to improve:

    1) pass prevention
    2) proper hand placement when someone has you in side control
    3) basic side control escapes
    4) not giving up your back
    5) establishing and maintaining side control
     
  6. mtruitt76

    mtruitt76 Purple Belt

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    Only watched the gi match.
    -Secure the cross face and isolate the arm before attempting to mount. You rushed the mount attempt and attempted to mount before you had established a solid side control position. Always take your time and secure your positions when you are up on points. You are winning, your opponent has to make something happen not you.
    -You basically gave up on your guard. You opened your closed guard without any real grips to work with and when your opponent started to pass it seemed you were still attempting to secure a choke. You needed to hip escape and re-establish your guard.
    -Your cardio was hurting because you were burning energy unnecessarily. In bottom side control you were muscling a lot on not utilizing hip movement. Using strength is fine, but make it count. Set up your escape and use power in short bursts. Also you were expending a lot of energy while in closed guard. Your opponent was staying very low and being defensive, not really trying to set up a solid guard break. Use these periods to rest and gather yourself instead of fighting continuously for a cross collar choke that is not there.
     
  7. boisefireman

    boisefireman Blue Belt

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    Before we start, I want to say I'm 42y/o, 230 lbs. I know what a big bastard on top of you feels like. I was right where you are as a blue, so I hope some of my insight can make you skip some of the mistakes I made.
    OK here we go, just my thoughts. I am watching as I write. I'm not being negative, I did the exact same thing 3 years ago, so I am with you Bro I only watched the gi match so far, but the cardio was a factor and I could tell the size of the guy was a little new to you.
    After hitting and awesome takedown, you dealt with a bucking and thrashing opponent. Instead of fighting for the postition, let his pushing let you move around his head to the otherside. A lot of guys don't switch sides on guys.
    You mounted and then dismounted and gave up to early and went to bottom. you should have smoked that guy in speed.
    On side bottom, get off your back. It makes the top guy feel heavy and limits your movements out and away. Too much just straight pushing. It had to make you tired. Hand placement seemed like an unknown. your sweep was great.
    Come on now, why no hook or why no mount. You got to make that guy earn it. You made him look better than he was.
    Ok, guard. Have a plan. something you go to every time to get you going. He reaches so far forward, he was begging you to scissor sweep him, or flower sweep, push sweep. He had no base. Go for it.
    He reaches so high up! Big guys, myself included, have trouble letting go of that closed guard, but it really hold us back. You could of held a sweep clinic.
    Come up on your elbow, that helps. If you don't attack, attack , attack, then he has all the time in the world to break and pass.
    At 3:30 you gave him a little nudge and he almost went over with that.
    The choke needs to be behind the ears at least. That is the gauge I use. he brought both hands in, push one over so he has two hands on one side and go to the back.
    3:53 commit to the sweep. 4:00 he stands, you can stand too. You owned him on the takedowns.
    Mainly your butt stayed in one place the whole time. He passed your open guard and you just defended by pushing. A lot of flat on your back pushing.
    Learn the Upa and get good at it. You escaoe under but soon, higher belts will make you pay. A really technical Upa is a must.
    All in all, you were far better at Jiu jitsu than the guy you went against. He was good and using his weight and crushing. I didn't see him try one sub. That is called " not jiu jitsu" Good luck and I am with you my fellow heavy weight master.
     
  8. DutchMafia

    DutchMafia Orange Belt

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    Summary:
     
  9. akdms

    akdms Blue Belt

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    I'm only a blue-belt / intermediate, so take what I say with a grain of salt. There were obviously positives, but I'll focus on what I'd fix.

    - Be more aggressive defending the crossface. You were trying to block your opponent's hips with your arm, while giving him the crossface. With a guy your size, his hips > your arm. Respect the fact that your opponent has passed your guard and set yourself up to be a decent side-bottom position (on your side, defending the crossface).

    - When your opponent is working on passing your guard, stiff-arm his head to the side he is trying to pass (then hip escape and recover guard). In gi around 4 minutes in you were actually pulling his head across your body, giving him the pass. If it fails, your arm is also on the inside to defend the crossface.

    - Use your hips more. Work on your shrimping and switching your hips. When you had closed guard in gi it looked like you were using your arm strength to break his posture rather than your hips. During and after your guard got passed 4 minutes into gi, I didn't see you hip escape once. In no-gi you were doing the same thing -- you clung to his arm with your legs and were going for an inverted triangle (which wasn't really there), which killed your hip mobility.

    - Work on getting off your back when on bottom. This goes for side, mount, and even closed guard. When you were mounted (both in gi and no-gi) there were several times when you could have straightened a leg and gotten yourself to a side. Instead you tried benching your opponent off you and tried to wrap your opponent with your legs (ended up working for you, but I wouldn't rely on it, and it had to have been exhausting). If you fail you end up giving him high mount and an armbar.

    - In no-gi at the end when you escaped mount, your foot crossed your opponent's center-line and you reaped your opponent's knee. Watch that. In most tournaments that's DQ.

    - In gi, the guy was begging to be pendulum swept at 1:44 - 1:46. His base was bad, you already had his arm, he was giving you the opposite leg, and you had space to move your hips. From 1:46 to 1:48 he was begging to be armbarred. Both of these go back to using your hips more.

    - When you break your opponent's posture in your closed guard, walk your legs up as high on your opponent's back as you can. The higher they are, the harder it is for your opponent to re-posture.

    - Slow down; secure your positions on top. Make him carry your weight and tire himself out try to escape.

    Overall good job though. Love to see how you do next time.
     
  10. SuperSuperRambo

    SuperSuperRambo Senior Moderator Senior Moderator

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    First match: Nice heel hook finish. That's why it's usually a bad idea to wear the shoes. Single leg defense and positional escapes definitely need work. Aside that, not much to comment on.

    Second match: Great sumi. When he turned to all fours facing you, you can't stay on your knees or you'll get taken down every time. Sprawl position is always on your feet. A knee on the ground makes you vulnerable. Again, positional escapes need work, though it was a nice reversal you pulled. An opponent with good base and transitions might not get caught with that one. Nice job staying on top and taking the back, but you pulled him the wrong way when going for the choke. Good attacks from guard, need to begin to chain off his defenses. When he was passing you pushed his head in the wrong direction to prevent the pass (unless that's not what you were trying to do).
     

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