Competing as a Purple vs. Blue Belt

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by TheGreenMachine, Aug 26, 2015.

  1. TheGreenMachine

    TheGreenMachine Blue Belt

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    Just was wondering some of the differences between competing as a purple belt vs. as a blue belt skill or technique wise or things to be aware of. I'm technically still a blue belt because I don't train at a school with the gi, but I've competed in and won blue belt divisions before at local tournaments and NAGA, so I wanted to try the purple belt ranks out to test myself in an upcoming comp. Anything purples do that is vastly different as in more guard stuff or gi stuff?
     
  2. nodferatu

    nodferatu Drilling in the south

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    Depends how long they've been a purple.
     
  3. Newcastle

    Newcastle Brown Belt

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    I'd say on average as you go up in rank you will find that everyone simply gets better. If you look at the number of competitors at any given rank it is large at white, pretty big at blue, and then the numbers start to thin out from purple through black. What ends up happening is those "average" blues and purples tend to stop competing and you're left with much better guys competing. That's just my $0.02.
     
  4. Byrd

    Byrd Blue Belt

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    You should throw on a gi and try blue belt gi division for the next one. You get more matches and if you do well in both then move up to purple
     
  5. HtomSirveaux

    HtomSirveaux Blue Belt

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    That's probably the biggest difference. By the time you get to purple, most of the casuals and less skilled guys have been weeded out
     
  6. NateTx4112

    NateTx4112 Brown Belt

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    I'm one of those causals that still competes at brown belt. I haven't had a match with a guy who is a career guy that works 40 hours a week and trains 2-4 times a week in awhile. Seems like I get monsters who are 6'2 who's abs have and that want to chunk this old guy around. -___-
     
  7. Newcastle

    Newcastle Brown Belt

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    As one of those "casuals" at black belt now when I look at my fellow division mates i'm like :eek:
     
  8. NateTx4112

    NateTx4112 Brown Belt

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    For Dallas my options are a double silver pan am medalist at purple belt, and the guy who just double gold at worlds at adult brown belt and possibly Jared Dopp if he enters. Or in the masters division two teammates. -____-
     
  9. Newcastle

    Newcastle Brown Belt

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    Yeah it's like FML...but the bright side is you can say you got beat by someone good instead of a scrub. LOL
     
  10. jr jr

    jr jr Purple Belt

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    My last local competition (I had a gi in the car) I did not compete. The closest guy to my size at purple was a team mate. He is 35lbs bigger than me and was 15 to 20 lbs smaller than the rest of the division. I have never done Masters at any weight as there are just not enough guys unless I do some traveling.
     
  11. TheGreenMachine

    TheGreenMachine Blue Belt

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    I've already done GI and No GI in Blue Belt at NAGA before about 3 years ago and placed 1st in Gi and 2nd in No Gi to the guy I beat in Gi. So I don't see much in doing it again, especially since my division that time was already really stacked and I still managed to win pretty comfortably. I also did a local tournament recently and only had 1 guy in my bracket at intermediate (blue belt) no gi who I had 10 pounds on but was a 3 stripe blue who I subbed. I'm looking for a challenge, but at the same time I just don't want to go up against a borderline brown or a 5 year purple, but I guess thats the trade off/risk. I figure my athletism and wrestling can fill in the gaps where I may not be as proficient with the gi as before since I don't train in it regularly.
     
  12. bjjaz

    bjjaz Got the Rock...Time to Roll

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    One of the differences I've noticed when I went from blue to purple is at purple people seemed to have cemented their "game" and had better game plans. I lost in the quarter finals in Vegas one year to a guy I KNOW I would beat in most instances but he honestly sucked me into his game and had his gameplan that I just couldn't get out of. From then on I had a general idea of a gameplan.
     
  13. Newcastle

    Newcastle Brown Belt

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    Well that might be true but you might also run into some incredibly good competitors. Don't think that because you reach a certain rank you can just dispatch everyone at any given rank below you. I've seen guys go out and silver at Pan at blue belt in the gi, then turn around and get knocked out in the first round of Worlds at the same belt rank. You just don't know until you go and compete.
     
  14. JustTheTip

    JustTheTip Green Belt

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    Where are you located? IMO there is a huge difference between local tournaments/NAGA than IBJJF tournaments. Other than Black,I think Blue belt is the level with the farthest distance of abilities.The elite Blue belts are good Brown belts. I would highly suggest gauging your abilities at Blue in Pans or Worlds before thinking you are a good blue because of local tournaments and NAGA. Personally, my first Worlds was an eyeopening experience and I was absolutely shocked at the level of all belts out there.
     
  15. Uchi Mata

    Uchi Mata Preaching the gospel of heel hooks and left kicks

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    It's certainly true that IBJJF competitors are typically much higher level than regional competitors. I can win or medal in regional competitions regularly, I have never medalled in the IBJJF or even really come close. That said, the people who win local tournaments are most likely good for their belt level. They're just not professionals, which is essentially who wins all the big IBJJF tournaments at every belt level. That would be a pretty high bar for being good. In general I think anyone who competes regularly is already going to be better than the vast sea of non-competitors at each belt level.

    The way I see it, you have 3 broad levels of practitioners: non-competitor hobbyists who vary greatly in quality but usually aren't that good for their belt level, amateur competitors who are typically the best people in their (often small) gym at their belt level, and elite competitors who typically come from big gyms (sometimes they move to train at those gyms), regularly train more than once a day multiple times a week, and who focus their lives on succeeding in BJJ competition. I actually think these people should probably be in a different division from true amateurs, and should also be compensating for winning. They are pros in every sense other than getting paid.

    Regarding the OP, what you find is that since quality varies so much more at blue than purple that while in blue belt divisions you might have some easy and some tough matches, in purple belt divisions almost everyone will be quite good and very dangerous. I think I only had maybe 1-2 easy matches at purple. I've never had an easy match at brown, though I haven't had many yet.
     
  16. smart.feller

    smart.feller Beer Drinker

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    You'll probably have a bad day moving up. Assuming that the playing field were level across all schools (it isn't), in a blue belt tournament you may find yourself against someone who is 5 days removed from being a white belt or a guy one gold medal away from his purple belt. At the purple belt level (again, assuming a level playing field) you may find the guy who is 5 days removed from wearing his blue belt but should be (theoretically) better than every single competitor in the field below, or find the guy who is one medal away from being a brown belt. It's luck of the draw sometimes. Some schools delay promotions to sandbag competitions. Some folks (like me) just like to go out and compete, win/loss/draw (though winning is preferred). Some guys are training while you sleep and are dreaming about training while they sleep.

    I will say this...most white belts with a year to two of experience would hang better in a blue belt bracket than most blue belts with 3-4 years training would hang in a purple belt bracket.
     
  17. Shizzx

    Shizzx Blue Belt

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    try it... as what my father told me. its better to go into a next belt in the middle and being able to handle yourself before you get promoted. you don't want to be the dude just starting over and trying to catch up. Just go for it. whats the worst that can happen, you lose. shrug shoulders... I competed and went through NAGA, local tournaments and so others and i have also competed and medaled in IBJJF tournaments and the competition there is a differnt level. YOu gotta prepare yourself for the Big times.. its no last minute choice to jump in like locals.. Thats where you put all your time and money into getting overall... Ive trained for months for nationals and worlds and i know some locals i signed up just because i was there and bored.. But level wise your in for a rude awakening.. but take it with open arms.. just like you did when you got your blue belt... Hell i take on any belt now.. have no problem doing it.. i've been blue, purple, brown and black belts before.. as someone said. make them play your OWN game. Suck them into your realm and work it out. GOod luck homie
     
  18. TheGreenMachine

    TheGreenMachine Blue Belt

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    Those are some pretty good categories and I agree with them. I'd put myself more in the amateur competitors bracket just because those who are the elite competitors have the money, sponsorships, and big name gyms to support them for their comps. I'd like to get to that level though, so that's why I also want to compete up a bit for the experience.


    Thanks for the advice here, I was definitely planning to compete in the purple belt ranks already, was just wondering a bit when it comes to certain guards or techniques played which you wouldn't see as much in the blue belt ranks? I have a hybrid game of wrestling and BJJ which some schools who are pure BJJ don't have, so I'm not really worried as much in the standup aspect as I am in what types of guards I may encounter. But I guess it will vary broadly across the board.
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2015
  19. Shizzx

    Shizzx Blue Belt

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    Thanks for the advice here, I was definitely planning to compete in the purple belt ranks already, was just wondering a bit when it comes to certain guards or techniques played which you wouldn't see as much in the blue belt ranks? I have a hybrid game of wrestling and BJJ which some schools who are pure BJJ don't have, so I'm not really worried as much in the standup aspect as I am in what types of guards I may encounter. But I guess it will vary broadly across the board.[/QUOTE]


    when i was awarded my blue belt, i didn't really start getting into competing until my first stripe in. then i was hooked. I did like 4 divisions per tournament and even started jumping into the purple belt division to test myself and giving them a run for their money. Ive beating a 4 stripe purple in a naga as a 2 stripe blue. SO as long as you stick to you game and define what you able to do it nothing to worry about. Competing do add up. as a blue belt i spent about 12k on tournaments travel, hotels, rentals, etc. only because i was doing any and everyone i could possible do. ( all out of pocket, no sponsors). So now i "pick my battles wisely" that shit get costly fast lol

    when i became a purple, i noticed that i pay more attention to hitting moves that i know work for me and ones that i can enforce on anyone. I do one sweep that i worked on for damn near 4 month straight over and over again with anyone i rolled with to make it my own. and successfully hit it on just about everyone that ive gone against (all belts). So Start finding your groove and work from there.. and All in all Have fun with it..
     
  20. Calibur

    Calibur Jiu Jitsu Snob

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    I noticed that as you progress in rank come tournament time everyone has a lot less nervous energy.

    That said, at purple belt you can actually demonstrate your complete game where as at white belt it's just a pure panic fest and the guys who win are the people who pull the trigger first and you have guys with potential bring eliminated fast in the first round because they didn't know how to get their game started.

    At the higher belt levels you get the opportunity to enact your complete game so tournament rolls are similar to how you roll in the gym while at the lower belt no one really looks like themself unless they have some magic bullet that none of their opponents were prepared for.
     

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