Common Misconceptions

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by Hipwr, Aug 19, 2010.

  1. Hipwr

    Hipwr White Belt

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    In training for BJJ I have noticed a few common misconceptions that many students and gym's fall victim to; Partially because of "old-school" mind sets but also because there is so much misinformation floating around.

    Warm-Ups: A warm up is supposed to do just that- Get you warm. By getting blood flowing to "cold" muscles one's risk of injury is greatly reduced. The risk of joint injuries are also reduced as the begin to produce synovial fluid, which acts as a sort of lubricant. Not to mention you begin to wake up your mind preparing it for the training ahead.

    Misconceptions: Many gym's have intense warm-ups; the warm-ups themselves almost become a workout which is not what they are intended to be. If intense physical exertion occurs right away when the body is cold you not only risk injury but also your Cognitive ability begins to suffer. This is why most professional athletes do not train strength before agility ( most don't even train the two skills on the same day).

    In short, if your warm up is crazy hard and it leaves you feeling shaky or exhausted your actual technique lesson will suffer as your body is not in the proper state to learn.

    Stretching: stretching is important for increasing flexibility and getting the muscle fibers ready for the real work to come; thus reducing injury etc. etc.

    Misconceptions: Doing static stretches ( Holding stretches) before a work out or training session- This is wrong as the muscles will loose elasticity thus decreasing explosiveness and also risking injury by deep stretching a "cold" muscle.

    However, not all stretching prior to exercise is wrong- Dynamic stretching: movements which mimic motions that may occur during training will positively elongate the muscle fibers without risking injury or greatly decreasing elasticity).
    For example controlled leg forward leg swings or arm circles lunges etc. are great ways to prepare the body for the coming workout. ( note: Balistic stretching: Bouncing movements are not the same as dynamic stretches, they are very dated and put the user at high risk for injury).

    In short: Do not hold stretches or deep stretch prior to a workout or training session, instead do dynamic stretches which bring the muscles and joints through a full range of motion.
    After training holds are fine as they reduce lactic acid thus aiding in recovery.

    Long post I know but many people do not understand these principles.

    Hope this sheds some light for some students or teachers who may be unsure or confused!
     
  2. bjjaz

    bjjaz Got the Rock...Time to Roll

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    I agree but, how would someone bring something like this up to an instructor???
     
  3. TangoMF

    TangoMF Blue Belt

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    I agree with a lot of this. Would love more information about how an intense warm up might affect cognitive ability.

    We have a notoriously grueling warm-up at our academy.
     
  4. Sloth

    Sloth Brown Belt

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    I think stuff like this is going to be less and less common as Bjj becomes more of a professional sport. More people with professional excercise/sports science back grounds are going to get involved in the process of training and I think the structure of classes, workouts and training are going to change a lot.
     
  5. curb1850

    curb1850 Green Belt

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    What do you do?
     
  6. Sloth

    Sloth Brown Belt

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    As an aside, it seems like a significant amount of the injuries I've heard of in Bjj training occur during warm ups.
     
  7. Hipwr

    Hipwr White Belt

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    I wish I could help here, it is indeed a very tricky subject to bring up as you do not want your instructor to take it the wrong way- many people dislike change and are unwilling to accept the science behind things such as a light warm up, for they have been doing the same intense type of warm up since they were a white belt.

    These are issues where I find the martial arts are slow to adapt and as a result training suffers.

    - I will be writing a more detailed post later this week when I have some time.
    I will further explain the cognitive impairment that a tough warm up can cause and
    I'll try to go into how to address an instructor or students
     
  8. Red Harvest

    Red Harvest Orange Belt

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    I agree but it's a bit subjective. Maybe a warm-up is difficult to a certain group of folks becasue they aren't conditioned for it yet. Some folks just can't handle any physical exertion what so ever because they don't train their bodies outside of class or they don't train often enough.
     
  9. Zankou

    Zankou Muscle and Hate Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    I definitely agree. I hate grueling warm-ups, they are a mindless form of training. If you are going to train physical conditioning, then train ... physical conditioning. Right. With focus. Not this half-assed grab bag of random maneuvers that you jump into, one after the other.

    Put another way, people need to learn the difference between a conditioning exercise and a warm up.

    Also agreed regarding stretches.

    The other thing that annoys me are "warm up drills" with no useful relation to BJJ. If you are going to make me do some warm up drills, at least make them something USEFUL, not army crawls and such. Like pummeling drills, penetration steps, and so forth -- things you would ordinarily train to acquire grappling skills anyways, not just to get a third-rate conditioning workout. Hip escapes and rolls don't bother me much for that reason, you are drilling a useful technique, but the random "conditioning" or gymnastics maneuvers are pointless for warmups.
     
  10. Rod1

    Rod1 Titanium Belt

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    Funny considering that my teachers who have professional sport training experience do have "gruesome" warm-ups and the one who has no title besides his rank does not.

    Maybe the reason a lot of people feel the warm-up is "gruesome" is that they are simply yet to achieve the fitness that the sport demands.
     
  11. Title Fight Productions

    Title Fight Productions Steel Belt

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    That is all "well and good", but we need to remember BJJ is just coming into its "sport" side. It is an infant in regards to "sport BJJ". This "old school" way of thinking really is just a generation (not even) away from being a solid form of self defense and an art used solely for actual fighting.
     
  12. Title Fight Productions

    Title Fight Productions Steel Belt

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    Army crawls loosen your hips up and teach you to keep them low to the mat while you are in side control.:icon_neut

    Gymnastics are a perfect cross over for BJJ. Body control, body awarness and that type of full body strength are strong additions to anyones BJJ game.

    I think you think to much.:wink:
     
  13. Rod1

    Rod1 Titanium Belt

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    Here is the Olympic national female judo team of Cuba doing pointless gymnastic maneuvers.

    YouTube - F
     
  14. Carrera26

    Carrera26 Orange Belt

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    I definitely agree on this one, and I eventually won over our sensei on it enough that I have taken over warm-ups. (It also helped that I have 4 years of pre-med and sports science is a passion of mine)

    I get sooooo annoyed at cold stretches and non-specific movements for warmup.

    So, that said, what are some favorite "functional" warmup and stretch routines that people do?

    Here's some I like (Judo class)

    Side to Side explosive jumps
    Jumping Seoi Nage deep turn-ins (working up to doing them with a front shoulder roll)
    Shrimping (duh)
    "Good Posture" pushing and pulling (moving opposing partner down the mat with good posture, let them yank on you if you get too much lean to test you)

    "Sumo Drill"
    Kids LOVE this. A few rounds of: Circle of belts, 30-60 seconds of hands-only move opponent out of circle or pull on back. Awesome for learning posture, kuzushi, etc. etc.

    Uchi Mata stretch - Hold classic Judo grip, go in for deep Uchi Mata, except that you fire the leg to your partner's side instead of between the legs. Awesome for technique and very, very specific stretching and warmup.

    What else works for you guys?
     
  15. SuperSuperRambo

    SuperSuperRambo Senior Moderator Senior Moderator

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    TS, it sounds like you're very anti-stretching, yet in BJJ flexibility is a great tool. How do you reconcile those two things?
     
  16. redaxe

    redaxe Silver Belt

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    I think he's just saying that you should do static stretching after the workout instead of before. Which is not exactly groundbreaking, a lot of people have been saying that for a while now.
     
  17. Rws177die

    Rws177die Yellow Belt

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    I used to hate the fact that our warm-ups are so hard. Iv'e felt like puking alot when I first started and wonderd what I had gotten myself into. Just a few weeks ago I watched a new guy throw up half way through it. Now I kind of appreciate the warm-ups we do. If you really love BJJ you will get threw it and keep on coming. Those who can't take it should stay on the couch and play video games all day.
     
  18. bnosam

    bnosam Green Belt

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    Another common misconception is that BJJ is easy and gay. Hell no it ain't easy. :icon_lol:
     
  19. Hipwr

    Hipwr White Belt

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    I understand what you're saying about people needing to have a certain fitness level however, warmups should be pretty standard and not to tough no matter what fitness level you are at; As for conditioning training that can be geared to be tough but you must realize there is a BIG difference between warming up your body and conditioning it pysically.

    I did not by any means create this post to bitch about physical conditioning being " too hard" more about warm ups and certain kinds of stretching being miss-used or misunderstood. I believe in working hard and lord knows too many lazy people are playing video games and whine when they have to get up to walk to the store.
     
  20. elbigsam

    elbigsam Blue Belt

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    i frequently lead our warmup at our gym. We have a 2500 sq foot mat. I lead a run around the mat, r laps normal, 1 lap high knees, 1 lap high heels, 2 laps sideways. I follow with 4 lengths of the mat doing rolls, breakfalls and shrimps. I then have the guys do 20 triangles and 20 armbars. I follow this with static stretching, shoulders, neck, hamstrings etc.

    While static stretches may not be perfect, I think they are a nice cooldown, and some casual students don't get much other time to stretch.

    Critique please.
     

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