Body by science

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by anomynous, Jan 12, 2015.

  1. anomynous

    anomynous Orange Belt

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    Here's a post about a not-so-new (2009) exercise book and its not-so-new approach that I'd like to ask about. The title of the book is in the title of this thread. Authors are Doug McGuff (MD) and John Little. The approach can be summed up, I think, by saying it involves slo-mo lifting to failure, in short sessions (as little as one 12-minute session per week). I've looked over the book, liked its approach, and decided to try a session last night.

    As to its suitability as an exercise regimen, that will certainly vary according to one's goals. It seems to be geared toward building up muscle as opposed to, say, increasing stamina. I don't think this would be a very good workout, for example, for MMA fighters or for other athletes who rely on stamina--such as bicycle racers. Maybe as something to vary their regimen in the off-season, but not as one of their more primary training regimens.

    For me it's appealing mainly as a way for me to tweak my routine and to, at the same time, learn a bit more about exercise and exercise physiology. I'm not an MMA fighter or endurance athlete, so I can be more eclectic in my choice of exercise regimens: I'm just looking to stay in decent shape and learn while doing so. I have to admit that the time factor is appealing as well. Finally, I don't have a spotter, so using this method on weight machines should allow me to lift heavier more safely.

    To conclude, I ran across a couple of interesting reviews on Amazon, for anyone interested. One review (written by a physician) has nothing but good things to say about the book (http://www.amazon.com/review/R3RSF1YMLR2ZVU/ref=cm_cr_pr_viewpnt#R3RSF1YMLR2ZVU). The other offers a few criticisms but still assigns a better-than-average rating (http://www.amazon.com/review/RBM7HVN3NMVB7/ref=cm_cr_pr_viewpnt#RBM7HVN3NMVB7). Together, the two reviews offer what seems to me a pretty balanced overview. Total rating by reviewers so far amount to 4.5 stars, so the book's gotten a pretty good reception.

    So, what are your thoughts on this book and its approach, Sherdog?
     
  2. Waingro**

    Waingro** 解決力 Platinum Member

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    So...synaptic facilitation by way of time under tension? Good for bodybuilders, I guess.

    Ideally you should be moving weights as explosively as possible. On the field, in the cage, or on the court, if you move slow: you're dead.
     
  3. anomynous

    anomynous Orange Belt

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    At my age the prospect for moving fast is vanishing a lot more rapidly into the past than I can possibly overtake it. It may be worth mentioning (or maybe not) that I've recently discovered rowing and am lovin it. Just set the Concept2 on 10 and row my tail off for .5 hour. I did over 8000 virtual meters last session. So I plan to keep doing that 1x per week, alongside the 15 minute slo-mo lifting session. But stationary bike--at least during the winter when I can't bike outdoors--is my main fitness gig.
     
  4. Fedorgasm

    Fedorgasm Silver Belt

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    I wish I could find an unbiased person who's good at reading scientific studies to go through all the sources in this book and see if they're legit.

    I didn't buy the book, but I do find it interesting that it has so many people swearing it works. Surely they can't all be shills.

    Unfortunately in my search I've only been able to find people who are dogmatically for it or dogmatically against it. I'm really curious to see what an unbiased expert opinion would yield.

    I would do it myself but I don't think I'm experienced enough in reading studies to identify if/where the study falls short.
     
  5. Greoric

    Greoric Double Yellow Card Double Yellow Card

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    While its not precisely revolutionary, because guys like Mentzer and Jones have already been touting HIT for years, it's definitely excellent at getting the point across at a very fundamental level.

    If you read closely, he makes a clear distinction between strength and skill based activities. Most of the endurance you gain in any particular activity is accomplished by doing the activity more efficiently, which is mainly achieved by neurological adaptations.

    The best way to get better stamina for MMA is doing MMA. Coincidentally the best way to get better at running is by running more. Both of these activities require strength generated by the specific muscles used, but the tasks you recruit your musculature to perform are made more efficient by more developed neurological adaptations.

    It's effectively the same reason you can have a professional basketball player go play tennis and get winded easily. Its not as if he's out of shape. He's just not efficient with movements required of tennis, thus his muscles have to compensate by working harder.

    Doing HIT gives a better baseline platform to jump off into other activities that you wouldn't ordinarily have.

    This is flat out bullshit. The strength variable in explosiveness is best trained by doing slow controlled movements. One because it prevents injury, and two, because you're keeping tension through out your targeted muscle's force production curve.

    Explosiveness used in the weight room has no effect on explosiveness used in a sport like MMA.
     
  6. JRT6

    JRT6 Black Belt

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    The lose of speed is the reason I took up box jumps again.
     

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