bjj vs. sambo

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by ohernand, Jul 23, 2010.

  1. ohernand

    ohernand White Belt

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    So what really are the differences and similiraties(?) between combat sambo and bjj? Being that fedor said that bjj has nothing special over sambo. do they have the same moves?
     
  2. Jagcorps_esq

    Jagcorps_esq Red Belt

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    They both are derived from judo and have generally the same concepts.

    The rules for scoring and the individual focus of each maybe different, but they generally work along the same lines.

    There is a bit more emphasis on leg locks in sambo.
     
  3. juji gatame**

    juji gatame** Brown Belt

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    Both are gi grappling with different rulesets/philosophies. BJJ, Judo, Sambo, are interchangeable.
     
  4. MattyECB

    MattyECB Green Belt

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    Really really stupid to group judo with those two. Please don't be that dumb as the focus on ground game is soooo much less intense, ne waza was a minor focus until BJJ and if you watch a judo match you'll see why this is a dumb comparison, in fact I'd say its better to group folkstyle in there.

    Edit: Course even that is hardly "interchangeable"
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2010
  5. FyouKantCme

    FyouKantCme Guest

    combat sambo is significantly different from bjj. Combat Sambo looks similar to mma. sport sambo and bjj are pretty close to being the same thing, with different scoring and focus of course. it's not uncommon for Sambo practitioners to also train Judo, just like many bjj practitioners train judo as well.
     
  6. supernova

    supernova Banned Banned

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    Sambo and BJJ derived from Judo and evolved in different ways. However, they share much at the core and while it is true that BJJ and Sambo have more emphasis on the ground game it must be noted that armbars (juji gatame), kimuras(gyaku ude garame, triangles(sangaku jime), americanas(ude garami), and all manner of chokes originated in Judo and there is an intense ground game depending on which branch of Judo you learn. 33% of my matches were won with subs. Most judoka try to balance.
     
  7. juji gatame**

    juji gatame** Brown Belt

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    Really stupid? Wonder why there's so much cross training goes on between the 3? Because they all involve the gi, have many of the same technique and they all compliment each other. Better to group folkstyle? No submissions in folkstyle and the BJJ practitioner with a good guard would feel more comfortable training Judo or Sambo.

    Judo at high levels have a very high focus in Newaza. If you were referring to casual practitioners then you would be right.

    Sambo is pretty much Judo with leg locks and no chokes (sport sambo at least).
     
  8. J Sho

    J Sho Green Belt

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    BJJ was an art originated from a Judoka teaching his students Judo (with a catch wrestling influence from his travels).

    Sambo was an art innovated by two judoka from judo and integrating elements from various soviet and other regional wrestling styles.

    All 3 styles (Sambo, Judo, BJJ have quite a lot in common)

    Combat Sambo is like amateur mma.
     
  9. ohernand

    ohernand White Belt

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    oh ok. so basically sambo,judo and bjj are interchangeable. so they do apply the same type of chokes and locks then? so if you learn one you can pretty much fend off the other styles?
     
  10. Jagcorps_esq

    Jagcorps_esq Red Belt

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    That's very general.

    They are not entirely interchangeable. They are similar and overlap many places, but when you have regional influence and differing focus, each is going to bring something different to the table.

    It's those differences that can win and lose direct competitions between any two of them.

    Quite honestly, the person looking to be well-rounded will not focus solely on one art. They will focus mainly on the one that appeals to them the most (or the one to which they have the most access) AND cross train in the others to supplement their game.

    I train primarily in BJJ. I also train judo. I've gone to seminars on wrestling and will do so in the future. If there were any Sambo seminars in this area, I'd go to them to. Any of these can be inserted into your game.
     
  11. lechien

    lechien Gold Belt

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  12. Stmarkus

    Stmarkus White Belt

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  13. dza76wutang

    dza76wutang Black Belt

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    At the heart, they are ALL; Judo, Wrestling (in all of its indigenous forms and variations), BJJ, Sambo (except Combat Sambo which is like MMA), martial arts that are designed to win in physical combat without strikes. Where they differ is the emphasis and the uniform, but flavors of each can be found in the others.

    Most wrestling variations emphasize standing grappling, and victory by pin.
    BJJ emphasizes ground fighting with its niche being immense R&D in the guard as a weapon.
    Judo emphasizes stand up grappling and victory by large throw with a good landing (ippon).
    Sambo is a good mix of stand up and ground work, however when you say Sambo, most people will think of leglocks, so I think it's safe to say that Sambo is famous for those.

    That said, those are the focus of each respective style in a very shallow nutshell. There's throws in BJJ, there's submissions in Judo, and there's plenty of ground work in wrestling (usually, some indigenous forms are like Judo and end after a good take down/throw).

    If you're stirring the pot trying to get a style vs style debate going, it's futile for 2 main reasons; one, there is ample obstinancy regarding style vs style, two, there's no objective/definitive way to determine a best grappling art, because the RULES and UNIFORMS are too divergent so there debate can't gain traction.

    If you're asking because you have Joe's Sambo and Bob's BJJ in your neighborhood and you can't figure out what you'd rather devote yourself to, try a few months at each, get your feet wet and then make a final determination based on style, chemistry with teammates, and how you like the instruction.
     
  14. BWC

    BWC Purple Belt

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    Kosen Judo is the basis for both BJJ and Sambo. Both look very similar and have almost identical techniques with some unique adaptions for each. Fedor has actually never trained in BJJ, but is world class in Sambo. He is just as good as at submissions as any BJJ equivalent..
     
  15. SteelHammer

    SteelHammer Green Belt

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    Other than leg locks (ankle, kneebar, etc), sambo is also known for using the legs for takedowns, using the legs for chokes (as in between the thighs, not like a gogoplata), and for lots of foot sweeps, similar to judo's kosoto gari, de ashi barai, outer reap, etc. Basically alot of focus on legwork, which in a way makes it the exact opposite of greco-roman wrestling. BJJ is sort of in between
     
  16. mehp

    mehp Orange Belt

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    Sport Sambo is very different from BJJ due to the rule set. You aren't allowed to choke in any way, you may not cross your legs and pins are awarded points, so positions have a very different value. Back Mount isn't that good, because it gives you no points and you cannot choke. Because back mount isn't as strong Turtle is quite good. Side Mount is probably the best position because it gives you points and you can submit your opponent from there. It can be very frustrating, when you have someone mounted and he simply turns over exposing his neck completely and you cannot do anything with it and don't get points either. But of course this way can learn a lot of arm and leg locks that are unfavored in BJJ like joint locks from back mount or while being back mounted, where in BJJ you would go for or defend the choke. The emphasis on throws is high because they can give points every time they land and can even cause an instant win.

    Combat Sambo allows crossing the legs, slams (except on the head), choking and striking (no stomps and soccer kicks but everything else ok). Despite the striking it looks more similar to BJJ because strikes only give points in case of a knockdown and it's hard to KO someone on the ground in a short time and with quick stand-ups.
     
  17. Shemhazai

    Shemhazai Black Belt

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    Rules make styles. If you want to be amazing at both ground grappling and standing grappling, cross-train.
     
  18. RacerX

    RacerX Orange Belt

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    Judo rules hearken back to the ancient battlefields, which explains the end points (devastating throw, joint locks, chokes, and pins). The goal is to end the match quickly without much lingering on the ground. The pin signifies that the pinner can leave if the pinnee's friends show up first whereas the opposite is not true (this explains why entwining legs defeats the pin: the pinner can no longer run away if the pinnee's friends show up first). BJJ rules assume a one-on-one match where drawn out ground fighting is effective. Sambo is interesting in that you can be pinned for points, but not lose automatically by pin and you are still pinned even if you have the opponent in your guard (guard is not seen as equal to top position, because it usually isn't in a real fight).

    The point is that the endpoints are different, but all make sense in the proper setting.
     
  19. Pragmatic

    Pragmatic Blue Belt

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    The main difference between the two are the rules used for competition and not so much the locks or positions themselves.
     

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