BJJ Learning Curve

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by nohuff, Oct 8, 2010.

  1. nohuff

    nohuff White Belt

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    [​IMG]

    I was bored and I made this... Except... maybe it should be log Y...

    Discuss... or Troll... :icon_chee
     
  2. iheartthemount

    iheartthemount Blue Belt

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    lol. very amusing man, gj!

    i'd like to see a correlation between wrestlers and their preference for certain positions/submissions. I mean it's not secrets that many wrestlers are great at front head chokes and what not, and i imagine many collegiate wrestlers are not crazy about being on their back.

    but i enjoyed it none the less.
     
  3. Crazy Legs

    Crazy Legs Orange Belt

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    I would say there isn't an s-curve, or not much of one.

    But more importantly... my yield curve is steeper than your yield curve. :D
     
  4. nohuff

    nohuff White Belt

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    iheartthemount
    I'm sure there is definitely a correlation. Wrestlers are always a lot harder to sweep from guard, but generally pretty easy to triangle until they get a bit of experience. It's funny too... you can always tell if someone is a wrestler when they grab both of your wrists and start driving forward no matter what the position is hehe.

    Crazy Legs
    I guess it would vary from individual to individual. In my own experience it felt slow at first and started to pick up pace more recently as I started connecting ideas and positions.
    and...
    nuh uh!
     
  5. iheartthemount

    iheartthemount Blue Belt

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    can we just add every martial artist on there?

    i've been doing tkd for about 15 years. and bjj became easier for me then most people (now in it for about 4+ years) just because i had a good understanding of body positioning and how to move my own body. but on whole i would not say that tkd or some other stand up combat sports lend to really aiding you in bjj.

    minus tae bo. pretty sure your set after a few years of billy banks boot camp.
     
  6. Goat Meal

    Goat Meal Shhh Belt

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    I agree that the learning curves converge about mid-purple belt. In the beginning the non-experienced practitioner is just as such a disadvantage. There's a way of moving on the mat and using your hips that wrestlers and judo guys have that isn't natural and I find it's hard for adults to pick it up at first.
     
  7. juji gatame**

    juji gatame** Brown Belt

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    I'll troll. Sometimes a person with no previous background yet they start BJJ and they are ridiculous. See: Jacare and BJ
     
  8. kramer733

    kramer733 Blue Belt

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    I don't understand why you need asymptotes.
     
  9. redaxe

    redaxe Silver Belt

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    In my experience the guys with experience in traditional Asian martial arts still suck just as badly as people with no prior martial arts experience when they start BJJ. They are sometimes even worse because they tend to be really stiff and move unnaturally because they are trying to incorporate their other martial art into their BJJ.

    I'm not talking about Judo here (Judo is a modern MA), I mean TMAs like TKD, Karate, Aikido, JJJ, Kung Fu, etc.

    Wrestling or Judo DEFINITELY helps, though. There are just a couple of "bad habits" that you have to unlearn, and you have to make a conscious effort to focus on learning the guard game, but otherwise almost everything is directly usable and effective in BJJ.
     
  10. Rod1

    Rod1 Titanium Belt

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    I don't think there is a curve that could fit like yours, it all depends on the individual, prior training is even worse when it comes to questions.

    You can have wrestlers that quickly adapt their game into BJJ, and wrestlers who never do and carry vices. You can also find Judokas that can easily roll around with BBs and those who again, would carry vices.

    I would put a recently promoted judo BB at blue belt, unless there is international experience, then its purple.
     
  11. redaxe

    redaxe Silver Belt

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    Yeah, an asymptote in the graph implies that there is a finite, set limit to anyone's potential skill level, and that an individual athlete can only approach that limit and get infinitely closer to it but never achieve or exceed it.

    I don't think that's the case with BJJ at all.
     
  12. nohuff

    nohuff White Belt

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    what if the asymptote has a slightly positive slope?...
     
  13. LemonHerbWRX

    LemonHerbWRX Green Belt

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    I have noticed that sometimes, when they first start, people with some wrestling background (1 or 2 years in high school) are easier to submit than people with no experience at all just because they have bad habits.
     
  14. Brian2

    Brian2 Blue Belt

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    I agree with this. wrestlers typically have decent top game and good controll but, also typically leave arms, legs and their neck out, to grab and submit.

    To me it is a different world and it means nothing if you have good control but, give up submissions right and left. They just aren't used to looking for the dangers.
     
  15. CyberFreq

    CyberFreq Blue Belt

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    As a wrestler mid-transition to BJJ I concur on all but the legs statement. Maybe I just haven't faced anyone with that propensity towards leglocks, but it stands that my legs are tucked away nicely thank you.

    For the first few months the most I was caught with were triangles and armbars from the guard. Then I learned how to apply T-rex arms from standup to the guard and boom. Way less times getting caught now.
     
  16. Brian2

    Brian2 Blue Belt

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    Your right, It isn't all wrestlers and honestly I am not into leg locks. Just seen a few wrestlers get caught in them a lot at my old gym.
     
  17. blackers10

    blackers10 Orange Belt

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    as a fairly new white belt with no prior experience in any sort of martial arts etc
    I found understanding the bio mechanics and the concepts of leverage on the body and learning how to use your legs AND arms at the same time to move around and hook opponents limbs
     

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