BJJ good for gaining muscle/definition??

Discussion in 'Gear & Equipment Discussion' started by jackstraw424, Aug 25, 2010.

  1. jackstraw424

    jackstraw424 White Belt

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    I started running (along with eating right and a few kickboxing/cardio classes at a local mcdojo) to lose weight last spring and now im at 160 lbs (down from 220 lbs and Im 5'11" so i was a total fatty). Im lean but not cut and I know its superficial but I reeally wanna be cut. Lifting weights is boring to me (Ill probly do it just to get stronger for BJJ) but I was wondering if BJJ is a good way to gain muscle and definition? I was planning to do a standup art along with BJJ but time-wise I might only be able to hit a few classes a week (1-3, 4 if Im lucky) and I thought it best to focus on one martial art.
     
  2. risingD

    risingD Guest

    wrong forum check out grappling forum or strength and conditioning
     
  3. GFG

    GFG Green Belt

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    if your always going balls to the wall then yes it can be the crazies workout, but if your a lazy ass bjj player like me then no. to me BJJ is the lazy mans martial art just pull guard and relax submissions always just pop up if set-up right
     
  4. irc

    irc Brown Belt

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    No. If you're already lean, BJJ wown't do much for. It wown't make you cut, and certainly wown't bulk you up. You might become functionally stronger and get slight definition, depending on where you're already at, but that's it.
     
  5. Rado

    Rado Blue Belt

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    To gain muscle and continue gaining you need to lift weights.
     
  6. KaosX

    KaosX Banned Banned

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    BJJ has been great for my core, but I'm still new and fighting my instinct to muscle through every problem. Muay thai was/is great for my legs/calves. Lifting helps my upper body....something for each area.
     
  7. jackstraw424

    jackstraw424 White Belt

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    oh man! just realized where i posted this. sorry, gear & equip up and grappling up in another window and i wrote in the wrong one.
     
  8. esum80

    esum80 แทงเข่าขวา

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    to gain muscle, definitely continue lifting.
    but yes, bjj will help with muscle definition, especially in the mid section
     
  9. 72Chambers

    72Chambers Blue Belt

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    Like someone mentioned before, it depends on the way you grapple, a better alternative in my opinion would be wrestling.
     
  10. Cavpilot

    Cavpilot White Belt

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    In my experience, I find No-Gi BJJ to be a tremendous muscle-building workout, because you have to use more raw strength to make up for having no traction on your opponent.

    If you train Gi, though, you may gain some functional strength, but won't likely build muscle.

    I'm not knocking Gi training, so people, don't jump on me about that. I've done both and I just find that No-Gi can be a muscle builder.
     
  11. mikiemike87

    mikiemike87 Blue Belt

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    First, you need to decide what your goals are. Gaining muscle usually depends on a calorie surplus, whereas getting "cut", fat loss, requires a calorie deficit. If you're interested in a long read check out:
    Exercise and Weight/Fat Loss: Part 2 | BodyRecomposition - The Home of Lyle McDonald

    Also check out his articles on weight training for fat loss. If you're too lazy to read the article. The gist of part 1 is that calorie expenditure is too low to get any significant fat loss, unless you're a highly trained athlete. Part 2 is basically saying exercise (aerobic + resistance training) improves the QUALITY of weight loss. Instead of losing weight in fat and muscle, exercise helps you lose more in fat, less in muscle. This is the key to getting cut.

    "even if exercise doesn’t increase the quantity of total weight loss per se (i.e. how much the scale actually changes), it can impact on the quality of weight lost; with proper exercise causing more fat and less muscle loss than would otherwise occur. Here again, proper resistance exercise, especially coupled with adequate protein, seems to be superior to aerobic activity or diets with insufficient protein."

    It really depends on what you're doing. Grappling works the muscles more than Kickboxing because of the higher level of resistance. So bjj would probably be more appropriate for your goals. If being cut is all you want, its much cheaper to just sign up for a gym and lift though. Check out more articles on fat loss at that site if you're interested. Tons of good info.

    Mike
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2010
  12. ohmalley

    ohmalley Blue Belt

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    i haven't lifted seriously in 5 years and i've found that bjj (when i train consistently) definitely leans me down and adds muscle. i'm not cut but i do appreciate some definition. the change in my body, while not drastic, has certainly been appreciable in the year since i started training.

    perhaps it's only fair to disclose that i have a body type that's ripe for gaining mass, so if you're a hard gainer bjj might not be enough. you know those jokes about guys who can go to the gym and get bigger by just looking at the weights? that's kinda me. the flip side is that i have to work hard to keep the fat off. so yeah, the intense cardio resistance workout bjj provides has been really good for me. if i actually decided to focus on getting cut i'd have to add a lot of cardio and overhaul my diet. for now i'm happy being muscular with a moderate amount of definition -- and eating *almost* anything i want -- and i owe a tremendous debt to bjj for that.
     
  13. koatliki

    koatliki Guest

    The only reason you got muscle with BJJ is because you didn't lift for 5 years, bro. I've been working out for few years and I treat BJJ/MMA as additional way to cut (add definition), definitely not to add muscle. You need to lift heavy weights and eat above your maintenance to gain muscle.
     
  14. Andrew Green

    Andrew Green White Belt

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    Some would consider that a advantage, not a disadvantage of the gi. The fact that it is less attribute dependent might make it a better long term recreational sport. There is a reason you don't see many old guys doing freestyle wrestling as a way to stay in shape ;)
     
  15. ohmalley

    ohmalley Blue Belt

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    nah, it's the bjj. it's not like i did nothing then suddenly started bjj -- i've been really physically active in a multitude of sports and martial arts, including judo, rock climbing, hapkido, cycling, all sorts of stuff. the judo, rock climbing and bjj have always added muscle when i trained regularly, but when i'm doing cardio-based, low resistance stuff like hiking and cycling and hapkido, i get leaner but not bigger. well, actually, my legs got bigger while training for the california aids ride, but that's another story. point is, i respond very quickly to any sort of resistance training. and, in fact, my caloric intake has actually decreased a bit over the last year -- just trying to eat cleaner. i've been getting a lot of comments about it lately, and my button downs all fit snugger on my shoulders and looser in the waist -- that's how i know for sure.

    note, however, that i'm not talking major size gains. getting bigger is NOT my goal (which is why i stopped lifting 5 years ago) and i don't mean to imply that you can add 10-15lbs of lean muscle mass via bjj alone. but the ts asked if it's possible to add muscle via bjj and the answer is yes. how much depends on your body type, the kinds of auxillary exercises you do for warmups, etc. judo pushups and jacknives were very fruitful!

    YMMV. cheers!
     

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