best way to start mma

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by j_johl, Apr 12, 2008.

  1. j_johl

    j_johl White Belt

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    I was wondering what the best way to get into mma was, if it was better to start with one style and then later add more or to train all of them at once would really appreciate the help. I was also wondering I have trained mma a little but not too much so im not a complete noob, but I am moving to Santa Barbara and was wondering if anyone new which one was a better place to train Rodrigo Clark or Paragon? thanks
     
  2. stlnl2

    stlnl2 Blue Belt

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    By saying you are not a complete noob you were at a gym for 1+ yrs?
     
  3. j_johl

    j_johl White Belt

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    A little off and on for a bout a little over a year becuase of some stuff, but I kind of forgot alot of my ground game.
     
  4. hxcore3000

    hxcore3000 Orange Belt

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    train mma all around but get your feet wet in smaller competitions"grappling or kickboxing" to get some experience competing in front of crowds
     
  5. EE6_TBOIO_MATb

    EE6_TBOIO_MATb Blue Belt

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    i think it s bullshit to start MMA as MMA.

    You have to have an area of expertise.

    Otherwise u ll be like all these loosers who can do a little bit of everything, but suck at everything.

    I'm pretty sure that almost all of the known fighters were either wrestlers, Thai Fighters, BJJ ers, Judokas, etc u name it, before they got into MMA.

    MMA as a style doesn't exist. MMA artists are people who are proficient at something, and who added other stuff to their game.

    But MMA from scratch is shit, I believe.
     
  6. Stubbsy

    Stubbsy White Belt

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    i totally agree and then some if you have a base you will always have a strong suite to fall on to. here here.
     
  7. plsdontbanme

    plsdontbanme White Belt

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    the best way to start MMA is to watch Never Back Down
     
  8. kray

    kray White Belt

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    I would suggest focusing on grappling until you are pretty solid at it and then start adding in muay thai, etc. You want to have the strong ground game to fall back on since most fights end up there anyways.
     
  9. Cash Bill 52

    Cash Bill 52 Brown Belt

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    HOw old are you??

    Wrestle in high school and college. Box and bjj around 20. Get a brown belt in bjj by 27. MMA career 27-36.

    Retire and buy an academy. Don't get hit in the face too much. Wanderlei and Nog have a lot of scar tissue at 31.
     
  10. Cash Bill 52

    Cash Bill 52 Brown Belt

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    Avoid double posting...
     
  11. DPS831

    DPS831 Purple Belt

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    frank shamrock comes to mind. He never played a sport or competed until he was introduced to the lion's den, and that was basically all around MMA training, worked for him (although hes such a great athlete that anything would have worked for him probably)
     
  12. Tony Manifold

    Tony Manifold Brown Belt

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    The person who said wrestle in high school had it dead on, if you are young enough.

    I don't have a problem with integrated MMA to start with. Being well rounded from jump is a great idea. However, you need a strategy. That could be, get the takedown and GNP, takedown, improve postion and submit, or keep the fight standing. A lot will go into deciding which strategy to pick: you build, strength, quickness, whiskers(if you can't take a punch choose one of the first two) and quite frankly which one you like the best.

    Once you have a strategy in place, train all areas with that in mind. For example, if you want to get takedowns, practice your striking to close the distance and clinch or set up the shot. Conversely, if you want to strike don't initiate take downs but defend them and concentrate on keeping on top, escaping to your feet from the ground etc.

    The problem with practicing one of the components by itself (if your goal is MMA) is that it can create bad habit that you will just have to break later. For example, in MMA it is better to accept the takedown and pull guard then try to twist to your stomach like in wrestling. There are advantages (such as quality of instruction and opponents) by practicing separately but there are advantages to integrated training as well.
     
  13. blink_man182

    blink_man182 Black Belt

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    I don't think nobody said this yet, but have fun and enjoy what your doing. Start off with someone you enjoy, try grappling and striking. Then I would suggest working really hard on one of them. And one you become decent at that, start the other. Worst thing you would want while training is to not have fun at what your doing.
     
  14. Throatpoker

    Throatpoker Black Belt

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    Train lots of BJJ, Judo, or Sambo...and hit the f-ing heavy bag.
     
  15. spat

    spat White Belt

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    i got my black in karate first. Not the best foundation according to most but it's something. Now i'm adding wrestling, bjj, and boxing. I pick up on stuff alot faster and more diligently than most, i think. My point being, once you master one art you'll find that learning others is only a matter of time on the mat. the first one is the hard one.
     

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