Best method to develop shins of steel?

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by spyu, Oct 10, 2010.

  1. spyu

    spyu White Belt

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    How do you guys train this so you can check leg kicks effectively. What's a good regimen and how long between each training do you need to rest your shins typically?
     
  2. xilliun

    xilliun Brown Belt

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    keep kicking that heavy bag.

    no rolling pins or rubbing anything up and down your shins.
     
  3. JackTucker

    JackTucker Orange Belt

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    Kicking a tire is a pretty good way to condition your shins
     
  4. LizaG

    LizaG Blue Belt

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    I repeatedly hit my shins with a smooth, flat board of wood (usually cheap MDF), my shins are now pretty tight and solid.
     
  5. Prophetic~Poet

    Prophetic~Poet Blue Belt

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    why?

    is it harmful?
     
  6. Varth

    Varth Green Belt

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    I don't see how it could be harmful. Tires are used in a lot of Kyokushin gyms and they are technically made of rubber so I imagine they are good for kicking. Kicking a steel pole, concrete or using rolling pins seem to be the idiots way out that will get them a wheelchair before they turn 50.
     
  7. FREAK656

    FREAK656 Yellow Belt

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    Step 1. Remove tibia and fibula
    Step 2. Insert steel tibia and fibula

    Congratulations! You now have shins of steel.
     
  8. Rhood

    Rhood Gold Belt

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    LOL
    I think that guy from Kickboxer (Tong Po) had that procedure done before.
     
  9. GNPwrestling

    GNPwrestling Orange Belt

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    ^This^

    No substitute for kicking around the ol' heavy bag.
     
  10. polsarc

    polsarc Brown Belt

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    My instructor thought most of those methods in the long run would ruin your bones. He advocated a very gentle tapping of the shin bone with a hard object so the bone could get used to it and harden. I don't know how it works. He said it took about five to ten years to get to the point where he could just throw kicks without worrying about it.
     
  11. futang17

    futang17 Green Belt

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    you could always graft adamantium on your shin ala wolverine
     
  12. valiant

    valiant White Belt

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    Best Answer.
     
  13. kinchan

    kinchan Guest

    kicking a tire is nothing for beginners imo, start with the bag, then later use a harder bag and/or tire if you want.
     
  14. Fear

    Fear White Belt

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    Heavy bag for me =]
    Either way its still a bone
    still would break under hardcore pressure
     
  15. SAAMAG

    SAAMAG San Antonio Applied Martial Arts Group

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    The tibia is a very dense bone already.

    Just like when lifting weights you have to make sure you don't overtrain, the same goes for increasing the bone's ability to take punishment. The micro fractures of the bone are what are going to make the bone harder...but to be honest...what most people have problems with is not so much that but with the pain tolerance of hitting the shin bone.

    The long and short of it though is that you want a slow and gradual increase in workload on the bone. This is to give time for the bone to adapt to it's eventual goal without doing harm.
     
  16. Frode Falch

    Frode Falch Gold Belt Professional Fighter

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    Kick alot on heavybag and hard thaipads
     
  17. ECS123

    ECS123 Purple Belt

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    The best way to develop "Shins of Steel" is to locate one of those old, "Buns of Steel" exercise DVD's, and perform the exercises on your shins rather than you butt. Just kidding. :icon_lol:. Work the bag and pads, and like other people said, forget rolling pins, kicking palm trees, and all the other ridiculous methods.

    :icon_chee
     
  18. Lionidas

    Lionidas Brown Belt

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    This. Don't kick anything else considering your a beginner.
     
  19. Coolcatsithe

    Coolcatsithe White Belt

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    Yep just kick the heavy bag religously. You need to get your shins used to your OWN leg power. Smacking your shins with sticks and using rolling pins will only deaden the nerves and potentially cause you to get over-confident with your kicking power and likely lead to injury later when you realize your shin might not be able to handle the damage from a full power kick getting checked.
     
  20. TwoFour Lowkick

    TwoFour Lowkick Orange Belt

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    This worked for me:

     

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