arm triangle set up question

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by teamventure09, Oct 20, 2010.

  1. teamventure09

    teamventure09 Yellow Belt

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    i know it's common to set up an arm traingle from side control, from the far side arm and then hop over to that side.
    my question is is it good and effective to set up the arm triangle from the side you are already on like with the arm on your side instead?
     
  2. Brian2

    Brian2 Blue Belt

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    Personally I don't like to do them from side control. I like to set them up from mount and then hop to side control to finish it.

    But you can get them from side control on the near arm. Its one of those things they have to give to you though IMO
     
  3. teamventure09

    teamventure09 Yellow Belt

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    yeah kinda like a thing only a newbie or a rookie would give you huh?
     
  4. Brian2

    Brian2 Blue Belt

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    IMO it is just a weird position that you would have to be in
     
  5. Bruce Calavera

    Bruce Calavera Purple Belt

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    Yeah...I won 2 matches by submission in intermediate nogi with arm triangles from side control. You just have to set it up right. Americanas do the trick quite nicely.
     
  6. Jim J

    Jim J Purple Belt

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    if you go for an arm triangle on the same side as your body in on, you are probably going to get your back taken. You are not going to have any control over your opponent while trying to lock it in. That is why you initiate it from mount or the far side from side control. You will have more weight on your opponent and better control while locking it in.
     
  7. Doctor Venture

    Doctor Venture Black Belt

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    We do it in Judo off of Kesa Gatame. Feed the inside arm over his face when you switch your hips to come to your knees, you already have the head underhooked, keep your head low and it is there. Not very easy to hit on someone who knows what they're doing though, for me. They tend to pop up during my transition, which is why I prefer the setup from mount or cross side. I didn't start working this till a couple of weeks ago though, so it not working so much doesn't say a lot.
     
  8. teamventure09

    teamventure09 Yellow Belt

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    solid advice. thanks. now i don't have to learn the hard way.
     
  9. Bebop

    Bebop Brown Belt

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    word. doing nearside is basically giving up the underhook to get swept. the biggest issue trying to do this for me was that you need your head behind their nearside arm, which is giving up the position altogether before you even lock in the move.
     
  10. hawaiianbjj808

    hawaiianbjj808 Green Belt

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  11. J Danger

    J Danger Armed with a Mind

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    you can set it up either way man
     
  12. laohu69

    laohu69 Blue Belt

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    It can also be set up from guard. It's harder to finish since you're on your back & can't get to the side but it can be done.
     
  13. Bruce Calavera

    Bruce Calavera Purple Belt

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    If you can lock it up in closed guard it's pretty easy to shrimp toward free arm which in turn forces a sweep because the arm they would normally post with is tied up in the triangle. Sorry if this doesn't make sense.
     
  14. laohu69

    laohu69 Blue Belt

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    Nah, it make sperfect sense. I just prefer to choke people (over EVERYTHING else) & don't look for anything else once I lock a choke in, I know its just a matter of time until I get the tap so I patiently wait while my oponent struggles against the inevitable.
    This is actually a weakness that I've been trying to overcome, I find myself getting tunnel vision trying to get chokes & missing other subs that are basically handed to me on a silver platter.
     
  15. redaxe

    redaxe Silver Belt

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    You can't really do it with the near arm from side control if he's facing you and shrimping away to escape.

    But if you can get him to turn away from you, for example by first attacking the far arm, then the near side arm triangle is a good option. When you get side control try to flatten him out and go for an americana on the far arm so he turns away from you to defend, then switch to the arm triangle with the near arm.
     
  16. MMABullrider

    MMABullrider White Belt

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    I like the arm triangle a lot, but it's harder to finish when you use a near-side side control set up. When you set up the choke from mount, the rotation of your body to side control adds a lot of pressure to the choke, even moreso when you set up the choke from far-side side control. When you sink the choke from near-side side control, you don't get that extra torque, so it's much harder to finish the choke from here. It's possible, but it's harder.

    The better option that I see for the near-side side control arm triangle is to use it to bait the guy into giving up his back. If he's in a position to give up the arm triangle, he's just as easily going to give up his back (i.e. his near arm is up and across himself). Sometimes I'll use the nearside arm triangle as a set up, the guy will either roll away from me, giving up his back or giving up a near side arm bar, or the guy will roll into me, giving up a far-side both-arms-in arm bar (or the back for that matter).
     
  17. SuperSuperRambo

    SuperSuperRambo Senior Moderator Senior Moderator

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    Sure you can do it with the near side arm, but you don't set it up the same way as when you go for the far side arm.
     
  18. teamventure09

    teamventure09 Yellow Belt

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    i think i did that once. i'll try it again. thanks.
     
  19. teamventure09

    teamventure09 Yellow Belt

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    actually you can scoot your hips out to the side making the choke work much better. all you have to do is post your foot on the mat almost like a shrimp.
     

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