Aikijutsu

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by Ghostdogg, Sep 5, 2010.

  1. Ghostdogg Blue Belt

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    so as i was wanting to take akido but do to the fact that pretty much everyone told me it doesnt work and is bs i was thinking of trying this what are the thoughts of this style
     
  2. phanattic Orange Belt

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    is this what you're talking about?


    YouTube - Aikijutsu Self Defense


    if so, from what i'm seeing the attacker becomes stationary after one (maybe two) attacks which is unrealistic and hilarious



    IMO
     
  3. Ghostdogg Blue Belt

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  4. Torrid Cunning Linguist

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    It's just for the outfit isn't it?

    It's okay OP, don't lie to us. Puffy samurai pants ftw.
     
  5. supernova Banned Banned

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    They are called hakama and are used in part to hide foot movement ;)

    Its all in application Aikido/jutsu are less effective against trained/experienced fighters. Better off using judo/jujutsu/jiu-jitsu. But aikido and aikijutsu are not bs and I have seen both be effective against aggressive attackers. The key to those arts is blending with an opponents attack to use their power, strength, and momentum in addition to yours to increase the effectiveness of your own attack. It takes a lot of training to be able to do this effectively whereas low level judoka/jujutsuka/jiujitsuka are apt to be able to use their techniques more effectively.

    Aiki arts suck for mma because trained fighters are able to attack without full on lunging or losing balance as much as an untrained fighter.

    For the record I have taken kenjutsu for 17 years and the unarmed aspect is jujutsu which is like judo and jiu-jitsu combined with some striking. Aikido I have studied for 4 years and aikijutsu for 2. In the street fights I have been in the judo was most effective (throw someone down hard on the pavement, or even grass, and they are all done) and some striking as well. I'm 6'0" 165 lbs so I lack ko power with punching against bigger opponents so throwing them is a great way to end things quick.
     
  6. Ghostdogg Blue Belt

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    very informal thanx
     
  7. Mr Fingers Orange Belt

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    I was wondering the same exact thing. I just started at a new university and the offer free aikido classes. I was considering trying it out to supplement my boxing, but I
     
  8. SteelHammer Green Belt

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    some of the moves are a little impractical but you can learn some decent standup grappling over time
     
  9. Ghostdogg Blue Belt

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    But u have it on your avatar as top 5 worst ma. I
     
  10. mjw1 Blue Belt

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    A lot of these arts techniques come from ancient Japanese Sword Culture which may be a bit out dated and are hard to hit in sparring etc however I have hit a few of these joint lock type techniques before in sparring or started to and then when the opponent resists or is preoccupied with the joint lock I hit them maybe thats more low lever than flowing from joint lock to joint lock but it sometimes works for me.

    My first Karate instructor though it was a hybrid system he had a black belt in akijitsu so we saw some of these moves which I sometimes try for when they are there.......
     
  11. PikachuManson Green Belt

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    Seriously... two threads about this?
     
  12. JerkWeed Brown Belt

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    TS, you obviously want to try it. Why not just try it?

    As long as you understand without a hitch of doubt that Aikido is not going to prepare you for MMA or make you invincible on the streets, you should be fine. Some people really enjoy it. You may be one of them.
     
  13. wildman1717 Green Belt

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  14. Bennosuke Blue Belt

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    Anything that can be said for Aikijutsu can be said for Aikido. The change in suffix from -jutsu to -do, has to do with a movement of an art from focusing on effectiveness to an emphasis on improving the self. For more information look up Gendai budo on wikipedia.

    Based on Aikido/Aikijutsu's origins I would say it has always been more of a Budo than a bujutsu.

    The reason I would not recommend either, and I feel this has been said before in both your threads, is that there is a level of realism lost when sparring is not included. Success in a fight or self defense situation is based on one's understanding of distance, timing and effective techinques. These understandings only really come about through competitive sparring which allows you to mimick a "real life" situation most accurately while keeping things safe.

    Those arts which include rigerous sparring tend to have culled those techniques that don't work and produce the students who are most likely suited to succeed in a fight.

    Sparring was removed from Jujutsu in the creation of Aikijutsu (if I have the mythology correct), in an attempt to remove the competitive aspect of sparring which tends to attract thugs (or Tapout wearing tattooed hicks). The emphasis in Aikido was to learn a gentle way, and in doing so improve yourself (hence it being Budo in my mind). While many of the techniques may be useful in a fighting situation, the practicing style does not help one learn to use techniques realistically. I would imagine if you did the art would become something like Judo or BJJ.
     

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