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advice for first bjj tournament

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by vegantravis, Aug 13, 2010.

  1. vegantravis

    vegantravis White Belt

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    i was just looking to get some advice for my first tournament. next week is my first tournament and im really nervous. so any advice would be really appreciated.
     
  2. bnosam

    bnosam Green Belt

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    Bathe in baby oil and vaseline the day before the competition.
     
  3. FXG

    FXG Orange Belt

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    scummy
     
  4. Mr Randy Watson

    Mr Randy Watson Green Belt

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    Get the takedown.
     
  5. dizzydean

    dizzydean Blue Belt

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    Drill the basics. Breaking & passing the guard. Escapes from mount, side control, back mount, north south. Escapes from triangle, armbar. Carbo load 2 days before the tourney. Have fun!
     
  6. keynote

    keynote Purple Belt

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    Don't reinvent the wheel, try to relax during your matches, and don't forget to breath.
     
  7. FXG

    FXG Orange Belt

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    worry only about what your going to do to your opponent, NO use worrying about what he's going to do to you.

    this is the best grappling advice ever given to me and has helped me tremendously.

    (it's seems obvious but it really keeps you focused)
     
  8. Rws177die

    Rws177die Yellow Belt

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    Just do a few moves you are confident in, stick to a simple game plan. Also relax and try to breath, it is going to feel like a ton of adrenaline going through your blood....
     
  9. InfiniteWit

    InfiniteWit Orange Belt

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    It's all mental man. Just go over the moves that you know well. Do those moves. Don't bother with anything else. Be confident but not arrogant. Look back at all the training you've done for the tournament and honestly ask yourself if you think anyone out there has worked harder than you. The answer should always be no.
     
  10. An end for

    An end for Purple Belt

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    Something that helped me from further humiliation more than once: if you're caught in a choke, don't be so quick to tap. Take your time, try to escape calmly but firmly, or at least to survive as long as possible. Put on your best face. Make it look like you're not being choked at all, and that the guy is completely wasting his time. If you can ask yourself if you should tap to the choke, then wait a little longer. Tap when you absolutely can't take it anymore.

    If you're caught in a joint lock, now don't think too much. Tap. If you're choked, you might pass out and embarass yourself. If you're in a joint lock, you might end up badly injured if you take too long.

    Also, don't get desperate, especially if you end up in a bad position. Be calm, don't spaz, don't waste your effort. Do things calmly.

    ...Oh yes, and be prepared for the event. It never hurts to bring water, some sandwiches and fruits, and some small cash. Even if you don't end up needing it, one of your buddies might do. Bring slippers or sandals, so you won't wander around barefoot, especially in locker rooms. Try to stick around to your team, not because you will compete in a Violent Team-Based Bloodsport or anything, but because it's the best way to take care of your stuff, get any help you might need, and of course, root for your teammates.
     
  11. snap-or-tap

    snap-or-tap White Belt

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    Just competed in my first tourney two weeks ago.

    Analyze your game, walk through each situation, standing, in guard, half guard, etc. know what you are going to do and be confident in it.

    Get in a good place mentally, visualize winning, explode into every movement like it's the most important movement of your life and BREATHE. you should never be breathing harder than your opponent.
     
  12. SuperSuperRambo

    SuperSuperRambo Senior Moderator Senior Moderator

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    Train hard and come in with a gameplan. Play to your strengths.
     
  13. 35andOver

    35andOver Blue Belt

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    For me, the biggest difference was dealing with the immediacy of the results of a given match. Rolling in class is laid back. If you get tapped quickly you just start again. You can take a few minutes to get your head in the game in class but can't afford that in a tourny. You get tapped and you're back to waiting around for the next match.

    Odd as it sounds, my advice would be to go submitted a few times during a couple decent rolls in with a training partner during warm ups. Put yourself in those spots you know you should avoid but keep finding yourself in during training. Get tapped out by your training partner in whatever type of submissions you technically know how to avoid but keep getting caught in class when you're not being careful.

    Then, work through escaping and avoiding them with your partner. Get the escapes and whatnot fresh in your mind BEFORE the real match. Get the first tap out out of the way then drill some offense.

    I've only done a couple tournaments at this point but in all cases, I found that my head was not turned on until I got through my first intense match. I was slow to respond and did dumb shit in those matches that I did not repeat during subsequent matches.
     
  14. Toastytoy

    Toastytoy Brown Belt

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    eat only normal things that you normally eat, dont try to have a speacial competition breakfast.
     
  15. Toastytoy

    Toastytoy Brown Belt

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    and be calm
     
  16. stile0

    stile0 Purple Belt

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    warm up properly. listen to some music or something. try not to watch other matches before yours. be confident in your technique.
     
  17. outonbail

    outonbail Living My Dreams

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    this might sound strange for some people but the best way for me is to

    1. not give a fuck about anyone else , just let them know where you are so someone can come and get you when you' relaxing with your music or warming up decently.

    2. only watch matches of teammates AFTER your first match, seriously, motivation can drown after seeing a friend loose badly. ( an exeption can be if there is an hour between matches)

    3.win or loose, put up a greater fight then your opponent and the odds are on your side, period.
     
  18. gtsbjj12**

    gtsbjj12** White Belt

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    I'd say the best things for me are to: game plan, make sure to get good rest nights before, stay well-hydrated, warm up, stay relaxed and listening to music(reggae for me) definitely helps me stay calm. Also, if you're a top-game guy, absolutely search for the takedown. However, if you're more comfortable with guard, just pull it before he takes you down. You want to impose your game; rather than the other player impose his on you.
     
  19. An end for

    An end for Purple Belt

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    Well... I don't know. I personally like it, because I usually go there completely tense and terrified of competing. By watching my teammates compete, I feel better, because I know that in the same way I'll have to compete, they're having to compete, so my mindset changes from "aw no, why do I have to do this? I wanna go home" to "aw no, my turn's coming up". Besides, the atmosphere does good for me, even though jiu jitsu isn't exactly the most exciting sport in the world. Rooting for my teammates helps me a lot to keep myself motivated, but I can see why it wouldn't be the case with you guys.
     
  20. aundie

    aundie White Belt

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    don't know if you aleady have been to the tournament but here are some tips!

    first of all try to get all the basic right with all basic positions/submission!

    get a good personal trainer! first get a partner that you are much better then advance to a partner who will be a more match and difficult!

    if you know who your opponent in the tournament is then try to find out as much as you can!

    there are my tips! if they are bad or good you can decide! just wanted to be to a little help :)
     

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