Advance Thai Pads technique.

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by Zoti, Apr 27, 2008.

  1. Zoti

    Zoti Brown Belt

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    Hello,

    Haven't been here for a while. Been busy with all kind of stuff and busy running my gym. I opened my gym almost 4 years ago and I've got a nice stable of students. Most of them have good basics and some are fighting and are more advanced.

    I work the pads with my students and I love using them to work the basic technique with the students but now I have the more advanced students and I need to make it more interesting for them.

    What I'm looking for is some more advanced Thai Pad techniques that are more challanging both on the technical and physical aspect.

    One combination I like to work on the pads for the more advanced is: jab, cross, 2 right kicks, cross, right elbow, switch left knee.

    Any ideas are welcome.

    I'm also interested in hearing some ideas on how to add more complicated stuff to my regular class where I will show a lot of technique. I show everything. Punch, kick, knee elbow and clinch.

    Thanks,
    zoti
     
  2. Gandhi

    Gandhi War Room Deep State Platinum Member

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    For conditioning I would chain in bigger combos, add some repeat round kicks in at the end, and clinch work. Belt guards would be useful.

    To make it more technical mix it with sparring drills. Ie guy holding the pads throws a light leg kick. Other guy checks it and works a counter round kick on the pad. Work kick counter one side, then the other, then mix it up.You can also work the counters into combos.

    Another suggestion is to take whatever technique you are working on that day and modify part the tai pad work out to incorporate it.
     
  3. Chinaboxer

    Chinaboxer Blue Belt

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    hmm...kk..let me think about this one....

    basic pad work - working single attacks and combination attacks to develop basic timing and distance. A mistake IMO is when a pad holder slowly sets the pads into position. When he should be "popping" them into position as fast as he can, which allows the striker to develop "attacking skills at the onset of an opening". Another mistake i see is when the pad holder stays fixed in one place. IMO he should be moving his position constantly, especially during combinations, which forces the striker to adjust, distance and timing.

    intermediate pad work - the use of basic defensive moves in coordination with single attacks and combinations to develop hand eye coordination in conjunction with defense and offense.

    advanced pad work - allowing the pad holder to use any variation, offense or defense, which forces the striker to choose the proper strike or strikes at the onset of the opening in conjunction with defensive movements. This mimics live sparring and prepares the practitioner for the next level of training...

    Glove to glove work...

    This allows each practitioner to practice a "back and forth" training method. Which at first focuses on single and combination attacks; both offense and defensive skills. But should eventually, with proper training, lead to a "light touch" back and forth. This helps to eliminate the fear of getting hit or hitting someone.

    All of this ultimately leads to "sparring" with safety gear, under strict supervision.

    As an instructor, don't get caught up in "i have to teach them MORE to keep their interest." This is wrong thinking IMO. Don't teach them WIDE knowledge, teach them DEEP knowledge. For instance, take the lead jab. Sounds simple, but every boxer worth his weight in salt will tell you, how very COMPLEX it becomes.

    Also, teach them to improve their ATTRIBUTES. for instance, have one person hold a mitt or pad by his chest, then have them "pop" the pad into position as fast as he can. Forcing the striker to see "fast" and hit quickly.

    Or, have the pad holder hold the mitt into position, but as soon as he sees the striker lead jab the mitt, the holder moves the mitt away. It becomes a game, who is faster between the two. And also develops good attributes in the pad holder as well as the striker. Again, this is just an example of just the "lead jab".

    It's not about how much you teach or how much they know; rather, it's about how well you teach them and how well they know it.
     
  4. Haze UK

    Haze UK Yellow Belt

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    at my gym we do alot of power trainig mixed with the pads, like a combo then a push up then another combo, those things kill me
     
  5. IkkussSpikkuss

    IkkussSpikkuss Amateur Fighter

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    Too many to mention. But here are some things I picked up training:

    First off let the advanced students guide their own pad workouts sometimes. Keep a watchful eue, but most advanced guys have trained at other places and have some combos that might be good for you to learn.

    My personal favorites:
    1.) Front leg teep, thai kick, switch knee, strong side elbow, cirlce step, spinning wheel clinch, knee, knee, push break, double thai kick, flying switch knee.

    2.) Power side root breaker, low switch kick, high switch kick, cross, hook, cross, blast step, cross, double switch kick, power leg teep.

    3.) Front leg outside check, switch kick, power leg teep, switch kick, thai kick, switch knee, power side elbow, front side elbow, power knee, push off, switch kick across both legs.

    And a lot others. Its important to note that a lot of advanced combos should start as a counter as you need to switch the emphasis from just attacking to being deadly off of a defensive transition. Just my opinion.
     
  6. IkkussSpikkuss

    IkkussSpikkuss Amateur Fighter

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    We do these with sparwls mixed in...I die a little inside everytime...LOL
     
  7. TapSD

    TapSD Killer Bee....1%

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    I think anything over a 5 punch/kick combo is overkill..keep it simple
     
  8. Ryukyu Damashi

    Ryukyu Damashi Ryukyu Damashi

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    A good pad holder just lets you throw what you want and catches it. Preset combos are great for beginners, but you really need to learn to flow with the pad holder.
     
  9. TapSD

    TapSD Killer Bee....1%

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    Actually i think the pad holder should be dictating whats thrown
     
  10. Chinaboxer

    Chinaboxer Blue Belt

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    yea..this is correct. Because it dictates the attacker "seeing" an opening and responding instantly. it shouldn't be the other way around, or else, what's the point of the pad holder? When the attacker dictates the movement, this is "heavy bag" work. You don't need a pad holder then.
     
  11. Ryukyu Damashi

    Ryukyu Damashi Ryukyu Damashi

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    The pad holder is fighting back, that is what makes it different than heavy bag work.

    This is what pad work should look like.

    YouTube - Boo Sasiprapa Gym
     
  12. Gandhi

    Gandhi War Room Deep State Platinum Member

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    Plus if the pad holder does not know what is coming you wont hit the pads well and will kick or punch the guy.

    I agree with the 5 punch combo - some MT classes (like fairtex in sanfran) do 15 move combos all round long - i dont see that as realisitc but it does work the cardio
     
  13. Ryukyu Damashi

    Ryukyu Damashi Ryukyu Damashi

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    I'm talking about high level trainers. I go to Thailand every summer, I have never had a good trainer call out combos.
     
  14. TapSD

    TapSD Killer Bee....1%

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    I've been to thailand 4 times..Japan 2 times and have NEVER dictated a pad session...its ALWAYS my trainer dictating the session...why would you let a fighter dictate whats thrown?
     
  15. ambertch

    ambertch Purple Belt

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    Are you good at wrestling?

    Once cool thing my coach did last week was actually shoot in for a takedown (and take me down if I didn't sprawl HARD.

    Mixing in takedown "attempts" and takedown defense really makes a pad session harder. And it's good cause then the student has to reset afterwards before completing the combo!
     
  16. millasur

    millasur Blue Belt

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    I don't even understand HOW a fighter could possibly dictate what's thrown, well they could by shouting out what they wanted to do but it would make for a very slow unfluid pad session. The point is the trainer holds the pads and dictates the 'fight', anything else is pure made up bullshit.
     
  17. Ryukyu Damashi

    Ryukyu Damashi Ryukyu Damashi

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    There is a difference between dictating the pad session and calling out combos.

    What camps in Thailand did you train at, who where your pad holders?

    I lived and trained in Japan for 4 years, what gym did you train at?
     
  18. Gandhi

    Gandhi War Room Deep State Platinum Member

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    Calling out combos is just a precursor to dictating the fight.

    The coash is still leading the session not the fighter.

    How else do you know what side the kick is coming from when doing a punch kick combo?

    Switching to knees, throwing upper cuts, all take cues from the coach plus he needs to know when the punching will stop so he can change with out eating a punch to the head.
     
  19. TapSD

    TapSD Killer Bee....1%

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    Fairtex Pattaya x 2

    Fairtex Bangplee

    Kaewsamrit

    Killer Bee

    Dude..ive trained with Anuwat Kaewsamrit...Apidej Sit Hrun...Yak Fairtex...Ganyao Fairtex...If your advanced you DON'T NEED someone yelling out combo's..I can tell what my pad holder wants me to throw by the way he positions the pads...I haven't had someone call out a combo for me in about 5 years
     
  20. Ryukyu Damashi

    Ryukyu Damashi Ryukyu Damashi

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