Acesulfame Potassium(K)

Discussion in 'Dieting / Supplement Discussion' started by Reveen, Dec 20, 2005.

  1. Reveen

    Reveen Purple Belt

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2005
    Messages:
    1,875
    Likes Received:
    152
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    I know aspartame is bad for you, but what about Acesulfame Potassium(K)? I noticed some posts saying it was bad, but when I googled it most of the info I found was positive. So is it OK or not?
    Thanks.
     
  2. Tap112

    Tap112 Yellow Belt

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2005
    Messages:
    202
    Likes Received:
    0
    "Acesulfame Potassium (K) was approved for use by the FDA as a safe artificial sweetener in July, l988. It is a derivative of acetoacetic acid. Unfortunately, several potential problems associated with the use of acesulfame have been raised. They are based largely on animal studies since testing on humans remains limited. The findings showed the following:

    Acesulfame K stimulates insulin secretion in a dose dependent fashion thereby possibly aggravating reactive hypoglycemia ("low blood sugar attacks").

    Acesulfame K apparently produced lung tumors, breast tumors, rare types of tumors of other organs (such as the thymus gland), several forms of leukemia and chronic respiratory disease in several rodent studies, even when less than maximum doses were given. According to the Center for Science in the Public Interest, it was petitioned on August 29, l988 for a stay of approval by the FDA because of "significant doubt" about its safety."

    http://www.sweetpoison.com/aspartame-sweeteners.html
     
  3. supersudo

    supersudo Purple Belt

    Joined:
    May 27, 2004
    Messages:
    1,819
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    San Diego
    From the book SAFE FOOD by Michael F. Jacobson, Ph.D, Lisa Lefferts and Anne Garland

    "Acesulfame K, sold commercially as Sunette or Sweet One, was approved by the FDA in 1988 as a sugar substitute in packet or tablet form, in chewing gum, dry mixes for beverages, instant coffee and tea, gelatin desserts, puddings and nondairy creamers. The manufacturer has asked the FDA to approve acesulfame K for soft drinks and baked goods.

    The public is waiting for an artificial sweetener that is unquestionably safe. But this one isn't it. Even compared to aspartame and saccharin (which are afflicted with their own safety publems - see below), acesulfame K is the worst. The additive is inadequately tested, the FDA based its approval on tests of acesulfame K that fell short of the FDA's own standards. But even those tests indicate that the additive causes cancer in animals, which means it may increase cancer risk in humans. In l987, CSPI urged the FDA not to approve acesulfame K, but was ignored. After the FDA gave the chemical its blessing, CSPI urged that iat be banned. The FDA hasn't yet ruled on that request."

    http://www.holisticmed.com/acek/


    sweetener guide
    http://www.holisticmed.com/sweet/ :)
     
  4. supersudo

    supersudo Purple Belt

    Joined:
    May 27, 2004
    Messages:
    1,819
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    San Diego
    ... acetoacetamide, a breakdown product, has been shown to affect the thyroid in rats, rabbits, and dogs. Administration of 1% and 5% acetoacetamide in the diet for three months caused benign thyroid tumors in rats. The rapid appearance of tumors raises serious questions about the chemical's carcinogenic potency."

    same page as above..

    o and btw.. here's a thread i started about it :wink:
    http://www.sherdog.net/forums/showthread.php?t=315576
     
  5. Reveen

    Reveen Purple Belt

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2005
    Messages:
    1,875
    Likes Received:
    152
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Thanks for the info. I was wondering then, can you recommend a quality protein powder that has no artificial sweeteners?
     
  6. supersudo

    supersudo Purple Belt

    Joined:
    May 27, 2004
    Messages:
    1,819
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    San Diego
    optimum nutrition's 100% whey protein comes to mind.. i can't think of anymore off the top of my head.. so if anyone else would like to jump in feel free.. lol :)
     
  7. Grady

    Grady Blue Belt

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2005
    Messages:
    571
    Likes Received:
    0
    I use ON's 100% natural whey, which happens to be sweetened with stevia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stevia ).

    I think the FDA rule disallowing Stevia being sold in my country as a sweetener instead of a supplement (US) is due to the crushing pressure of the folks that make Nutrasweet.

    If you want 100% safety, don't use a protein powder that contains any sweetener, or just get on that uses sugar, or add your own sugar if you want. FYI -- "All natural" products can be as bad as anything man-made.

    (I could market dried poison ivy leaves as a dietary supplement and call it a 100% All natural product, which it is.)
     
  8. Reveen

    Reveen Purple Belt

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2005
    Messages:
    1,875
    Likes Received:
    152
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    What's "stevia"?
     
  9. supersudo

    supersudo Purple Belt

    Joined:
    May 27, 2004
    Messages:
    1,819
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    San Diego
    read up on it at those sites
     
  10. Grady

    Grady Blue Belt

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2005
    Messages:
    571
    Likes Received:
    0
    Uh, hello McFly? I put a link right in the post where I mentioned Stevia.
     
  11. Reveen

    Reveen Purple Belt

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2005
    Messages:
    1,875
    Likes Received:
    152
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia

    Cool, just read it now. Seems to be mixed opinions on this stuff too!
     
  12. Herculean

    Herculean Purple Belt

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2003
    Messages:
    2,452
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    20 000 leagues out of my depth
    yeah the FDA will pass whatever makes them money , so long as the product will not kill you instantly and cannot directly be traced back to causing illnesses then they do not give a fuck..
     
  13. Zeirhk

    Zeirhk Green Belt

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2003
    Messages:
    1,143
    Likes Received:
    0
    The truth sucks.... it's all about money. If I had 5 trillion dollars I could pay FDA (or any organization) to legalize steroids......and perhaps all recreational drugs.
     
  14. Reveen

    Reveen Purple Belt

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2005
    Messages:
    1,875
    Likes Received:
    152
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia

    This product contains Acesulfame Potassium.
     
  15. supersudo

    supersudo Purple Belt

    Joined:
    May 27, 2004
    Messages:
    1,819
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    San Diego
    if u're lookin at the "gold standard" or "gourmet" flavors.. then yes they do..

    look for "100% natural whey"

    http://www.bulknutrition.com/?products_id=532
     
  16. Reveen

    Reveen Purple Belt

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2005
    Messages:
    1,875
    Likes Received:
    152
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Is sugar really that bad? Are substitutes like aspartame & stevia any better for you?
     
  17. Grady

    Grady Blue Belt

    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2005
    Messages:
    571
    Likes Received:
    0
    Sugar isn't bad, its the stuff that keeps life going!

    Its just that eating a lot of sugar isn't very good as our bodies aren't designed to process a lot of it in raw form. Your system expects sugars in more complex forms (complex carbs a.k.a starches).

    As long as you aren't diabetic, putting some sugar in your protein shake is probably fine. It might even be GOOD.
    (note that some BB and PL sites recommend eating some sugar, preferably dextrose, as part of your post workout drink anyway, to replace glycogen stores in the muscle cells. When your cells are low in glycogen after a workout, they are more prone to enter a catabolic state. You body does this by releasing a hormone called cortisol, which breaks down tissue to make more glycogen, so that your enegry levels are maintained. Providing sugar will help slow down or prevent this reaction).
     
  18. fwb

    fwb White Belt

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2005
    Messages:
    103
    Likes Received:
    0
    Acesulfame K is not metabolized by the body and is excreted unchanged.
    ...
    More than 90 studies have demonstrated the safety of acesulfame K. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration permitted the use of acesulfame K after evaluating numerous studies and determining it is safe for its intended use.

    The FDA approved acesulfame K for use in liquid non-alcoholic beverages (soft drinks) on July 6, 1998. FDA has reaffirmed acesulfame K's safety on nine separate occasions by broadening its approval. A general use approval was grated by the FDA in December of 2003.

    The Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA), the scientific advisory body to the World Health Organization and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, reviewed the available research on acesulfame K and concluded that it is safe. JECFA has also established an ADI of 15 mg/kg of body weight.

    The Scientific Committee for Food of the European Union published a comprehensive assessment of sweetening agents in 1985. This committee of toxicological experts from the EU member countries accepted acesulfame K for use in foods and beverages. Acesulfame K has been used in Europe since 1983, and in the U.S. since 1988, with no known documented adverse health effects.

    Source: http://www.caloriecontrol.org/acesulf.html

    ------------------------------------------------

    How does the body handle acesulfame potassium?

    Acesulfame potassium is not metabolized or stored in the body. After it is consumed, it is quickly absorbed by the body and then rapidly excreted unchanged.

    Is acesulfame potassium safe?

    Yes. Acesulfame potassium is safe and suitable for all segments of the population. The FDA, which is the governmental agency responsible for ensuring the safety of all foods, has approved acesulfame potassium for use in numerous food products on eight separate occasions since 1988. The agency based its decisions on a large body of scientific evidence that demonstrates the safety of the ingredient.

    Have other regulatory bodies reviewed the safety of acesulfame potassium?

    Yes. Acesulfame potassium has been approved for use in about 90 countries. For example, it is widely used in foods and beverages in the United Kingdom, Germany, Australia and Canada. In addition, acesulfame potassium has been reviewed and found safe by the Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives of the World Health Organization and the Scientific Committee for Food of the European Union.

    Can acesulfame potassium cause cancer?

    No. Acesulfame potassium has been thoroughly tested in several long-term animal studies. The tests, which used amounts of the ingredient that are far higher than a person would normally consume, clearly found no evidence of cancer or tumors.

    Source: http://www.ific.org/publications/brochures/acekbroch.cfm
     
  19. Tap112

    Tap112 Yellow Belt

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2005
    Messages:
    202
    Likes Received:
    0
    However, the studies that purport to show safety have been challenged by a number of individuals and organizations, most notably the Center for Science in the Public Interest in the USA. They claim that the existing studies are inadequate (despite being peer-reviewed), that there are flaws in the research protocols, dosing, and time length of the studies, and that as a result the carcinogenicity of acesulfame K may not be properly understood. In particular they note that there have not been long-term human studies, so they doubt the studies which show that acesulfame is rapidly absorbed and then excreted unchanged (i.e. not metabolized by the human body) are representative of the long-term.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acesulfame_potassium
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Center_for_Science_in_the_Public_Interest
    http://www.cspinet.org/
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.