A-class Shooto?

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by Grappleboxing, Sep 29, 2013.

  1. Grappleboxing

    Grappleboxing Brown Belt

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    What exactly is that rank? I saw that grapplers like Shinya Aoki and Jake Shields have that as their ranks in conjuction with their BJJ black belts.

    What exactly is a rank in Shooto representative of?
     
  2. BJ@LW&WW

    [email protected]&WW Gold Belt

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    In shooto they separate fighters into classes, essentially so that they have what would be equivalent of amateur bouts and professional bouts, and things in between. Different classes fight under slightly different rules i believe. It's not really a rank the way a belt in most MA are.
     
  3. Harukaze

    Harukaze Brown Belt

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    It's the sport's licensing system. An A-class license means you're a pro Shooter, and full Shooto rules apply (including ground and pound, knees to the head, and, up until a few years ago, strikes to the back of the head!). B-class is semi-pro, and IIRC there are limitations to ground and pound, no knees to the head, and shorter rounds. C-class is amateur, and headgear and shinguards are used as well as more fight-rule limitations and shorter rounds once again. I can't remember all the exact details, but you get the general idea.
     
  4. Grappleboxing

    Grappleboxing Brown Belt

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    Ah, interesting. Never knew Shooto was built like that. Very good info.
     
  5. makaio

    makaio Blue Belt

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    Fighter classes

    Shooto fighters are categorized into four Classes.

    Class-D : Amateur (2x2min, Headgear, Special point system)
    Class-C : Amateur (2x3min, Headgear, Special point system)
    Class-C+: Amateur (2x3min)
    Class-B : Pro (2x5min)
    Class-A : Pro (3x5min)

    Fighters start out as Class-D or Class-C fighters and enter amateur competitions that Shooto hosts together with the help of local gyms all over Japan. Class-D Shooto does not allow knee strikes to the face or striking on the ground. Class-C Shooto does not allow striking on the ground, but knee strikes to the head are allowed. There are regional championship and once a year the All-Japan amateur championships. Then a fighter can get a Class-B pro license, these fights are 2x5 minute long and use the same rules as Class-A fights. For new pros Shooto each year hold a rookie tournament in each weightclass.

    When a fighter has gathered enough wins and experience in Class-B he will get awarded with a Class-A license, as a sign that he's part of the elite professional fighters.
     
  6. Crossface9

    Crossface9 Blue Belt

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    Very interesting, thanks.
     
  7. Saenchai

    Saenchai Purple Belt

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    Anyone know how foreigners can get into shooto in japan?
     
  8. lechien

    lechien Gold Belt

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    Just train at a gym that is affiliated with Shooto I guess.

    Enson was the only foreigner that went straight to Pro according to some stories.
     
  9. Bosozoku

    Bosozoku Orange Belt

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    If you go to Japan you can just join a shooto dojo, you'll probably be encouraged to compete. I had a couple amateur bouts about 9-10 years ago when I was training shooto. It was a pretty good organization in my experience, well run, developed athletes at a smart pace, a good entry/farm system to MMA I think.
     
  10. Calibur

    Calibur Jiu Jitsu Snob

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    Yup. Just go up to a gym affiliated and ask. I have more experience with pancrase but the systems built the same.

    Honestly I think other countries should adopt this system. It's really safe but gives anyone the experience they need.
     
  11. Grappleboxing

    Grappleboxing Brown Belt

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    Damn, that is a brilliant system. Why the hell aren't we using something like that here?
     
  12. lechien

    lechien Gold Belt

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    While I like that system and I think it avoids mis matches and promote a "safe entry" to mma, I think it will not attract lof of competitors due to the no strikes rules on the ground for compulsary beginner class.
     

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