A bunch of random facts about Chuck Liddell taken from his book.

Discussion in 'UFC Discussion' started by igorvswanderlei, Feb 11, 2014.

  1. igorvswanderlei

    igorvswanderlei Αmateur Fightеr

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    I just finished reading Chuck Liddell's book Iceman: My Fighting Life. Just like the Gary Goodridge book I reviewed, this is a very apt title as very little of the book is about his upbringing, it's all about his fighting life. He talks about being raised by his single mother who always taught him to stand up for himself and his grandfather who also helped raise him and tough him how to throw a punch. His father was not a part of his life and Liddell refers to him as a "sperm donor," nothing more. Beyond that it's all about the fighting.

    What I didn't like is that he offers virtually no dirt on anyone except his nemesis Tito Ortiz. No behind the scenes stories that would make anyone look bad. Those type of things are what I like most in a book and it's why Liddell's is my least favorite (though I still enjoyed it) of the four MMA books I have reviewed and posted about.

    Here we go with the parts I found most interesting. The parts in quotes are word-for-word from the book.

    "Normally it takes six to nine months to move up a class in each belt in karate. With three classes in each belt (white, green, brown and black), a student could spend nearly three years at each level. But by the time I was sixteen - after just four years in his dojo - Jack felt I was ready to take my black belt test."

    "...I grew up and filled out between my fifteenth and sixteenth birthdays - jumping from five-nine, 155 pounds, to six-one, 186."

    In high school: "That junior year the wrestling coach, who competed at my weight class in the local police league, challenged me to a match. If I won, the entire team could take off that day's conditioning drills; if he won, we had to do double the work: an extra set of sprints, an extra set of rope climbs, an extra round of wrestling without breaks... I pinned the coach in the first round."

    The origin of his mohawk and tattoo on the side of his head: "During my senior year, in 1992, Eric and I were going to see a Slayer concert with a bunch of our roommates. We loved Slayer and wanted to do something crazy and memorable for the concert. Matt pulled out some electric shears and said, 'Hey, let's shave our heads.' ...But my senior year I had finally decided (to let my hair) grow out. So shaving my head wasn't exactly a crazy notion. We started throwing around some ideas; then Matt suggested I get a Mohawk. I thought, cool. That was the extent of the conversation... I figured that it wouldn't be too long before I had to get a real job and grow it out, so why not enjoy it until I graduated? That was my reasoning when I decided to get my head tattooed as well. I chose the Japanese letters that spelled Koei-Kan, my karate style, which means House of Peace and Prosperity. I wanted the tattoo to be somewhere everyone could see it without me having to take off my shirt, but also in a spot where I could hide it once I started interviewing."

    For work after college Chuck was kickboxing, bar tending and teaching karate. As a kickboxer: "Even when I was the main attraction, I still wasn't making more than $500 a fight."

    About Dana White: "In 1988 he was living in Boston, working as a bellman at a hotel... He joined Welch as a boxing coach, and they started doing classes for inner-city kids as well as a fitness program for people who didn't know anything about boxing. Dana was making about $50K a year working as a bellman and had a good life doing the boxing stuff on the side."

    Chuck's favorite action movie is Best of the Best. His favorite drink is Patron.

    His top 5 favorite fighters to watch: #5 Antonio Banuelos, #4 Glover Texeira, #3 GSP, #2 BJ Penn and #1 Matt Hughes.

    At UFC 17, his UFC debut: "They paid me $1,000 - including expenses - and put me up in a Marriot or a Sheraton or someplace like that. When we had the weigh-ins, they used a bathroom scale, which made me laugh. If you know how to shift your weight right, the balance on the scale would change, and you could come in just over - or just underweight."

    At IVC 6: "I had my first sponsor, the magazine Full Contact Fighter, which was paying me $500 to put its logo on the shorts I wore into the ring. Even better: Not only was I getting $1,000 to fight, I'd get another three grand for a win as long as I actually won the fight - that was more than what Nick would pay me in two or three kickboxing fights combined."

    IVC 6: "The venue was a nightclub. When we walked in though the back door, we could see fighters bleeding from their noses, mouths, heads, and eyes getting stitched up in the kitchen. It was pretty crude, even for me, and looked like a butcher shop... (there was) blood everywhere you looked."

    In 1999 Liddell and his friend put up $10,000 to open a kickboxing gym called SLO Kickboxing. Besides kickboxing they also taught weight training and martial arts. Within a year Liddell started earning $4,000 to $5,000 per month there.

    "And their offer for me to fight after I won in UFC 22 wasn't all that appealing. They wanted a three-fight deal. I'd get $1,000 to fight the first match, plus another $1,000 if I won. Then $2,000 and $2,000 for the next fight, and $3,000 and $3,000 for the third fight." He didn't take the offer and ended up with a one-fight deal in the IFC for $4,500. "I weighted in at 195 the day of that fight, after dropping 19.5 pounds in eighteen hours."
     
  2. igorvswanderlei

    igorvswanderlei Αmateur Fightеr

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    After his victory in the IFC the UFC offered a new contract: "Now I had a three-fight offer on the table, with all three fights set to take place either in late 2000 or early 2001. The terms were $5,000 guaranteed for the first fight, plus another $5,000 for winning. $7,500 guaranteed for the second fight and $7,500 more for winning; and $10,000 guaranteed for the third fight, with another $10,000 if I won. That was $22,500 just for walking into the cage, probably more than I had made combined in my previous seven years of professional kickboxing and MMA fighting."

    On Jeff Monson: "They called him Snowman, a nickname he earned while fighting a tourney in Brazil. They said he was like a snowball - white, compact, rolling, and getting bigger and stronger as the fights went on."

    "A lot of guys felt that they'd get in better shape by training in the higher altitude. I never bought into that. Altitude training is crap. Two days back at sea level and any benefit you gained from being up there was gone."

    For his fight against Guy Megzer in Pride he was paid $20,000 to show up and another $20,000 to win.

    "Babalu had a rep for his serious workouts. He didn't just go for jogs; he sprinted through the mountains of Brazil. He didn't just bench-press at the gym; he used training partners as dumbbells and lifted them. He didn't just swim; he swan two thousand meters in less than an hour."

    Before their fight at UFC 43: "(Couture and I) had been workout out together for a few days before the fight was announced. His coach asked me how I set up certain moves, especially for getting out of trouble when I am in the bottom position. I have a lot of fakes that get people to bite, which is why I am so hard to hold down. But Randy was a heavyweight; I didn't see us fighting anytime soon... Then I learned a valuable lesson: Everyone is a potential opponent."

    "But about six weeks before UFC 43, I had a setback. While sparring one morning I tore the MCL in my knee... Severe lateral movement, the kind that comes from the violent twists and turns of wrestling, was out of the question. Instead I could work on only my stamina and my stand-up. There would be no going to the mat."

    At UFC 44 Tito vs Couture: "Tito was getting $125,000 for fighting and another $50K if he won. Randy was getting $105,000 for showing up and a $70,000 win bonus."

    At UFC 47 Ortiz vs Liddell, Ortiz was paid $125,000 and had he won, an additional $50,000. Liddell was paid $50,000 to show and another $50,000 to win.

    Part of his training before a fight: "I did the wall ball, where I take a 125-pound medicine ball, throw it against a wooden beam, and make it bounce back at least three feet. It's hard enough picking up the medicine ball. But to make it bounce back is brutal. Then do it five times. For three sets. With just a minute of rest in between. This built up my shoulders and helped my punching power."

    Typical diet leading up to a fight: "My diet is reduced to cottage cheese, fruit, nuts, grilled chicken and salmon, steamed vegetables, protein shakes and occasionally some sashimi or sushi... I follow a 40-30-30 plan: 40 percent carbs, 30 percent protein, and 30 percent fat. I also take supplements such as glucosamine, which helps rebuild my cartilage and wards off arthritis, and MSM, a sulfur-based pill that gives me more energy and rebuilds everything from cells to bone."

    "And I don't buy into the old cliche that you've got to abstain before a big fight. So if I relaxed with a couple of girls before the Tito fight, no harm. One time, a couple of hours before a title fight, Dana made one of his incessant calls to check on me. I answered, 'Can't talk now, I've got two girls in the shower, gotta to.' Sure, it freaked him out. But I had a good time."

    At UFC 66: "Before most of his fights, Tito rips the Team Punishment beanie he wears during his introduction off his head and throws it into the crowd. Two years earlier someone might have grabbed that and either framed it to be hung in their house or put it on eBay. But tonight, when he tossed it over the side of the cage, someone caught it, then threw it right back at him. That was fucking classic."

    "When I fought Tito, I wasn't dating anyone seriously. So after a night of celebrating at the clubs, I brought some company back up to my room. A lot of company. I can't remember how many women, but I know it was more than two. I had promised Dana the gloves and trunks from the fight, and he had forgotten to get them in the celebration after. He came by to my room in the morning, knocked on the door, and someone let him in. He saw two girls asleep in the living room, two more girls in the bathroom, and a girl in bed with me. None of us had any clothes on. And Dana remembers seeing condoms hanging from the lamps, on the floor, pretty much everywhere."

    The first season of TUF cost $10 million to produce.

    Liddell was paid $800 per week on the first season of TUF.

    About TUF: "I didn't watch the show when it premiered. In fact, I haven't seen more than a handful of episodes. I hate seeing myself on television. I don't like the way I sound or the way that I walk. I won't even watch my fights when they are replayed, and I have a problem watching the highlights that flash on the screen."

    After the second fight with Couture: "But suddenly a lot more people were interested in what I was doing. Nothing could prepare me for videos of me showing up on YouTube doing something as mundane as teaching a kickboxing class. Forget about clips shot from a phone of me making out with two chicks giving me lap dances at a club. I quickly stopped reading newspapers or going online. It's still that way. The only time I know someone has said something about me or posting something I've done online is when a friend tells me or I get a call from a radio station asking me to comment."

    After the second fight with Couture: "I signed a seven-figure endorsement deal with Xyience."

    Liddell made $250,000 for the second Babalu fight. Babalu made $21,000.

    For the second Tito fight: "I was going to make $250,000 that night no matter what, plus a lot more for getting a piece of the pay-per-view money... Six months after my fight with Tito I was still getting checks in the mid-six figures from my share of the pay-per-view."

    Chuck made 500K for the Rampage rematch and another 500K for the Jardine fight.

    From the "Acknowledgements" at the end of the book: "I also need to thank the fans at Sherdog, whose stories provided great details of every fight written about in this book."



    The parts I found most interesting from Gary Goodridge's book: http://forums.sherdog.com/forums/f2/bunch-random-facts-about-gary-goodridge-taken-his-book-2665385/
    From Tito Ortiz's book: http://forums.sherdog.com/forums/f2/bunch-random-facts-about-tito-ortiz-taken-his-book-2648855/
    And from Ken Shamrock's book: http://forums.sherdog.com/forums/f2/bunch-random-facts-about-ken-shamrock-taken-his-book-2642459/
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2014
  3. ticho123

    ticho123 Black Belt

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    None of these books seem very interesting tbh. A bunch of bragging combined with some UFC trivia. But its a good thing youre here to show this to me, otherwise I would be risking to see the chuck Liddell book in some store and buy it out of curiosity.
     
  4. Eddieg

    Eddieg Brown Belt

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    The room littered with condoms and women is hilarious.
     
  5. DarthChen731

    DarthChen731 Gold Belt

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    Lol fuckin Antonio Banuelos
     
  6. PUO3

    PUO3 You are a can. Staff Member Senior Moderator

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    Never liked Chuck but I miss his fights.
     
  7. WinningOne

    WinningOne Green Belt

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    Thanks for the notes. Some interesting stuff in there, but surprisingly the most boring of them so far
     
  8. FascistDictator

    FascistDictator Banned Banned

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    yeah... not really very juicy at all.
    i remember being so shocked when i saw that. i was such a big Tito fan. this was my sad, unwilling initiation into the world of fighter bashing. :(
     
  9. maksy

    maksy Black Belt

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    Awesome,thanks for posting!
     
  10. Old Man

    Old Man Black Belt

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    Which was your favorite book?
     
  11. Sharknado

    Sharknado Green Belt

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    The first fighter I'd ever heard of. Plus Randy/Chuck II was the first fight I had ever watched. Will always love him and his fights

    WAR ICEMAN!!!
     
    oliver766 likes this.
  12. yekmurat

    yekmurat Silver Belt

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    First I said too long I cant read but after starting it finished quickly thank you
     
  13. irollnaked

    irollnaked Purple Belt

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    appreciate your threads igorvswanderlei. I was looking to read up an mma related book. Which was your favorite and which would you recommend?
     
  14. Chubz

    Chubz Red Belt

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    I read this book a few years ago and loved it. Highly recommended if you're a Chuck fan!
     
  15. Jocke

    Jocke Black Belt

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    I'm suprised Chuck was ever lucid enough to write a book. Good shit none the less, very interesting to see what the life of these people are like.
     
  16. Jew Jif Shoes

    Jew Jif Shoes Brown Belt

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    Chuck is a boss. First he takes care of two girls in the shower, then he goes and takes care of Tito in the cage.
     
  17. dog y

    dog y The original dog

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    He trains at The Pit... they've probably been mates forever.
     
  18. JudoThrowFiasco

    JudoThrowFiasco Charming Quark Platinum Member

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    I always though that it was punches and drugs that made Chuck lose his edge...turns out it was copious amounts of ass. nice.
     
  19. trident

    trident Water Belt

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    lulz
     
  20. DizzyYeahYeah

    DizzyYeahYeah Red Belt

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    Cheers.

    What book are you planning on reading next?
     

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