12 oz. vs 10 oz. gloves for pad work

Discussion in 'Gear & Equipment Discussion' started by SeoulStriker, Dec 7, 2009.

  1. SeoulStriker White Belt

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    I remember reading that you shoulnd't hold heavy dumbells while shadowboxing as it slows your muscle memory for punching speed. j
    Would the same principal be true for glove size? Would my speed improve with a lighter glove? I guess a con would be not as much endurance training using a lighter glove.

    The gym I train with uses 12 oz. gloves, and I was wondering how much an impact having your own pad gloves has had instead of using the gym spares.
     
  2. revad3 Blue Belt

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    Normally training gloves from people who advises are 14oz and above.
     
  3. 72Chambers Blue Belt

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    hmmmm interesting point, but I'm not sure about the validity of that statement, where did you hear that from?
    If that's true the same could be said about sprinters. Doing heavy squats will effect their stride frequency, but i know sprinters who go heavy for squats all the time. I've heard that using HEAVY weights (anything above 3lbs) for shadow boxing isn't too great for your joints but that's pretty much it and I think the 2 oz difference isn't significant enough to really matter.
     
  4. SeoulStriker White Belt

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    yeah but sprinting doesn't=squating. Squats are weight lifting whereas sprinting is completely different. If you shadowbox with heavy weights you're practicing to throw slower punches than you normally could, which is my understanding of the concept? idk someone correct me if the shadowboxing with weights thing is wrong.
     
  5. fightstuff Green Belt

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    to be honest the difference between training with a 10oz gloves opposed to a 12oz glove is going to have a marginal effect on your muscle memory.

    good point by 72chambers about hand weights. whilst using hand weights are certainly beneficial in building strength and stamina when shadow boxing if they are too heavy you will damage your joints. an alternative is kinetic training.

    i think the 3 main things you need to get right with your training is speed, accuracy and power. these need to be balanced. ive had students before who were quick, but had no power behind their shots. i've also had students who are powerful with no speed or accuracy to their shots. It's importance that you focus your training around these 3 aspects and get them balanced.
     
  6. SeoulStriker White Belt

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    yeah i've never used a 10 oz so i wasn't sure how much lighter it felt but 16s are huuuge on me. Would it be right to say that as long as your hand is protected, that the lighter glove is better to train pad work?
     
  7. 72Chambers Blue Belt

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    You're right, that wasn't the best example. However I do see sprinters and wrestlers who use resistance bands on their wrists, waist and ankles when performing running and shooting drills.

    I wouldn't worry about it too much but I think it's good to use both extremes. I only use some cheap 8 oz gloves when hitting pads/bag but when I'm shadow boxing I like to alternate between 16 oz gloves and no gloves at all in between rounds. That way you get the benefits of conditioning without losing the speed (I think).
     
  8. ECS123 Purple Belt

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    ^ Bravo. Succinctly phrased and well thought out analogy that may very well be a more applicable comparasion that the TS thinks. Both activities do in fact correlate well. Both involve pushing muscles, with weight laiden resistance, to improve speed as the end result. There must be a study somewhere that shows the point of diminishing returns, because larger reputible boxing equipment manufacturers all offer super bag gloves with the ability to add weighted bars. Some even up to over four pounds. The undue stress on joints and ligaments as John mentioned would be my concern.

    As far as a nominal two ounce difference between 10 and 12oz. gloves making an effective difference, I certainly would not be overly concerned with that. It may matter in an Olympic Boxing scientific think tank study, but that would be like worrying about your genetically predisposed number of red and white muscle twitch fibers, or trying to improve upon your VO2 Max, as opposed to just improving your cardio.

    :icon_chee
     
  9. 72Chambers Blue Belt

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    Thank you, thank you.

    :icon_chee
     
  10. Cannon_6 Green Belt

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    I agree with fightstuff. You probably won't notice any difference between 10oz and 12oz. Sometimes I use 16oz training gloves on the pads, and sometimes I use 7oz traditional bag gloves. I haven't felt any difference in speed or endurance between the two... but maybe I'm just obtuse.:icon_neut

    If you use your own gloves and take care of them, they won't stink like the gym gloves do.
     
  11. SeoulStriker White Belt

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    Thanks for the responses guys, I should have thought out how little 2 oz.s really is before making the thread, i keep forgetting how much more a lb is than an oz lol. If the only really advantage to having your own pad gloves is the lack of stink than i think i'm fine with using the spares for now.
     
  12. Ryukyu Damashi Ryukyu Damashi

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    IMO it's better to use traditional 6oz bag gloves. They force you to punch correctly and build up your wrist strenght.
     
  13. bleaK Blue Belt

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    Heavy gloves will build speed and endurence if anything, after your used to throwing with something heavier (oz's, not lbs) you'll be that much quicker with something lighter due to less resitence.. If you were using a HUGE difference, I'm sure you may maintain slower punch speeds.
     
  14. fightstuff Green Belt

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    yeah i do have to agree on this point. when i used to fight i used to train and spar with 18oz gloves. i remember when i used to slip on the 10oz gloves for the fights that i felt the difference. my punches were a lot quicker and my stamina was better. the only problem with training with a 18oz glove on pads though is the foam compresses real quick. i think at the end of the day you should think about where you want to go with your training. I.e. if you want to fight professionally then your equipment will be different to someone who is training for keep fit and self defense. most people will use a 12oz glove for pad/bag work and a 14 or 16oz glove for sparring.
     
  15. SquidKing Yellow Belt

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    Frankly, I think using fight gloves for pads feels great, and fast.
     

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