Why is BJJ so ffff-ing hard?!?

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by Revolution, Jul 27, 2009.

  1. Revolution Purple Belt

    Revolution
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    I've been training for only about 3 months, so yeah, I know it's still brand new. But I can't seem to do anything. I'm constantly in positions/situations that I have no clue what to do. Although I "know" (that is, I'm aware of) a number of subs, I almost never pull them off. Can someone please tell me what the learning curve is like, and at what point do you start to see the puzzle? Also, aside from going to class as often as possible, what else can I do to help myself understand.view BJJ as the chess match it should be (or so I'm told). I mean, to me, just getting my ass handed to me 3x per week doesn't seem to be helping. :redface:
     
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  2. jcarp White Belt

    jcarp
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    Do not get frustrated. I bet you are rolling with more experienced people. It will come. You still have to think about things and do not act as quickly. It will come.
     
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  3. Rjay Green Belt

    Rjay
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    If it was easy, everyone would be doing it. Everybody gets their ass handed to them at the start. I've been training for 2 years in a few months and I'm still getting my ass handed to me on a regular basis, its the nature of the game. Once in a while you may want to roll with a beginner.... then you'll see how far you've come. You keep going with the tough guys, you're going to keep getting worked and you don't see how your game has actually improved alot.
     
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  4. FLoWitheGo** Banned

    FLoWitheGo**
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    Talk to your instructor and tell him this. Maybe buy some instructionals to help supplement your bjj. My favorites going over concepts and fundamentals are Science of Jiu Jitsu with Maia and No Gi Made Easy with Mike Fowler. Saulo's is pretty good for that area as well. In terms of other dvds I enjoyed, I liked Robert Drysdales Nth Dimension and Jacare's instructional. Think about what your weakest at or what position you feel most clueless in and try to work from there.
     
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  5. ajzoot White Belt

    ajzoot
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    That's what makes it so great. I mean if you came in and were holding your own against dudes that had been doing to for years then why bother learning it if it's that shallow.

    But don't get discouraged, I didn't sub anyone for MONTHS (and even then these were just americana's on white belts from a 230lb dude). I would say after a year to a year and a half is when you start to put together a gameplan, find the few moves that you like and building yourself a more personal rolling style.... and more important than anything else is you begin to understand the concepts that make sweeps and moves work. That's when BJJ really becomes fun.
     
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  6. OrangePJsII** Banned

    OrangePJsII**
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    Are you grappling with people who are 1) your size, 2) remotely close to you belt wise?
     
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  7. esila Green Belt

    esila
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    The learning curve is different for everyone. The one constant is that dedication and hard work will NOT go unrewarded.

    I highly recommend setting "mini-goals" for yourself. Break everything down for yourself systematically. Try it this way:

    - Overall Big Goal - I Want to Get Better At BJJ. This involves:

    - Learning Proper Offense:
    - Work and drill positioning:
    - Top control (mount, side control)
    - Guard retention
    - etc.

    - Work and drill submissions
    - Top positions (mount, side control)
    - From guard

    - Learning Proper Defense:
    - Work and Drill Escapes
    - From bottom mount
    - From bottom side control

    etc. etc.

    Talk to a higher belt to break some of these things down. You will see that the list can get a little "big", however it's the starting roadmap to what you have to do. From there, break each thing down into manageable chunks, say bottom side control defense. Promise yourself during the week you are going to do everything possible to learn how to keep proper posture under side control, work on your hip movement, etc. Dedicate the week to just not getting killed from under side control. Last 10 seconds without getting tapped. Increase to 20. Increase to minute. Small steps.

    Before you know it, you will see more and more things marked off of your list. Guess what - progress!!!

    Start today - start now. Break down what you have to do - I would recommend anything defense-first. Then just keep working at it! No sense saying "I have to get better" without identifying what you have to do first! Good luck!
     
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  8. Revolution Purple Belt

    Revolution
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    Great posts, guys. Thanks. It's nice to know it's not just me. I guess what's been troubling me is the question of whether the practice of rolling and getting my ass kicked is in and of itself helpful. I guess it is, so off I go.
    BTW, orange: most of the guys I roll with are failrly close to my size (5'10", 180), and they tend to be advanced white belts and blue belts, with the occasional purple thrown in.
     
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  9. jcarp White Belt

    jcarp
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    They should be beating you then. If it was easy everyone would do it.
     
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  10. nikko1 White Belt

    nikko1
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    I am new also (3months), and i only pulled off my first submission in class about 2 weeks ago. It felt good to know that I was actually learning something and was lucky enough to pull something off. I am still getting tapped, but for the most part I am still playing the defense and just learning as I go. Every person is different and everything clicks at different moments. I think once you have successfully executed your first submission cleanly then will you start to think "hey now I get it.....sorta" It will come with time to do things but once it does you will find that your eagerness to learn will grow even more because the simplest of moves will start to feel second nature to you and you will be ready to understand all the different moves that are taught later on.
     
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  11. redaxe Silver Belt

    redaxe
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    Basically after about 3-5 months of this you'll be starting to "get it" and probably be able to submit most of the brand new guys who come in the door, and your defense will improve to the point where you can at least survive against most of the other white belts.

    At a year or so you'll be one of the better white belts, be tapping the new guys like it's nothing, and be able to survive against most of the blue belts. This is the point where you start learning some new techniques and experimenting with open guard, and you will improve by leaps and bounds. Then around a year and a half to two years you'll be ready for blue belt, and that's the point where you basically already know all the main techniques you need to know, and you need to start filling in gaps in your game, working on guard, sharpening your escapes, tightening your submissions, etc--it's the point where the real hard work begins.

    (Your experience may vary.)
     
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  12. BSFT Brown Belt

    BSFT
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    the thing about being new (with a chess game analogy)

    you're playing a game without all the pieces. trying to win a chess match when you have one pawn, isn't generally going to go over very well. even if that pawn is a complete badass, you're still gonna lose. learning and practicing may earn you another couple of pieces which will make you a bit better, and improve your game.

    you have to take the small victories where you can. when i started i was getting armbarred by the instructor every 10 seconds of the 3 minute rds, so it became a battle to not get armbarred, my AB defense got really good. once he couldn't AB me, he started triangling me, once i got good at defending that, he couldn't sub me from his back anymore, and had to go for sweeps, then my sweep defence got good and holy shit, all of a sudden i got a good top game, (it was about a 3 month progression)

    everyone learns at a different pace, the key is to just take your victories when you can (i'm gonna survive for 1 minute, tap at 1:01, oh well, i got my minute)
     
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  13. BJJisFUN Orange Belt

    BJJisFUN
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    I was getting my ass handed to me for the first six months...it seemed like I was the new guy for a long time. Sometimes I felt like I wasn't getting any better. Then a bunch of newer guys came in, and I got to try some new stuff. It was frustrating at first to go over mount and side control concepts during the technique section of class, then never get to those positions during sparring. Once the newer guys came in, I'd get mount or side control and think 'what was I supposed to do from here?' That's when I went from always being on the defensive to looking for opportunities for offense. Now, I look at rolling with higher belts as opportunities to work defense, and rolling with lower belts as a chance to work on positioning. I'll even get to the point where I've locked the sub in, but I'll let them fight out and I can start chaining moves together.
    Another thing that's helped is staying after class and working on stuff. There's always a purple or brown belt willing to work with me, and this time is invaluable. It really helps me to have my mistakes pointed out to me WHEN I AM DOING THEM, and they're willing to do that. Then I can better pinpoint where I need work...it's hard sometimes to self-realize where you're going wrong. Videotaping yourself rolling helps with this too...getting a third-party perspective helps me to see my mistakes.
    Just keep training.
     
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  14. Jagcorps_esq Red Belt

    Jagcorps_esq
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    If people that have been training longer than you couldn't hand you your ass, would you really want to devote time to train in that art?

    Just saying.
     
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  15. johnkreese Brown Belt

    johnkreese
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    If it makes you feel any better, I'm about 2 months in and I still get my ass handed to me by guys much lighter than me.

    I started taking a private lesson a week with one of the purple belts at my school. He showed me some cool stuff, then, I went to class and forgot it all! hahaha! Hopefully I'll remember more after the next time I do one.
     
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  16. SuperSuperRambo Senior Moderator

    SuperSuperRambo
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    3 months is not a long time at all. Keep training. It comes very slowly.
     
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  17. shel74nf Green Belt

    shel74nf
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    I'm right at 3 months too... I train mostly with guys who at about the same level, so we are all in the same boat. So there's a lot of give and take in there. I was still feeling clueless until I started rolling with new guys, then I realized how much I'd progressed, which was encouraging. Of course like you when I'm rolling with advanced whites or blues it's all defense and tapping, but that's what you'd expect.
     
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  18. magpie** Banned

    magpie**
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    b/c you are posting stupid things like this instead of analysing how you are getting beat and looking up techniques on youtube on how to escape/defend yourself.
    you will not submit people very often or at all for the first few months.
    and start going more than three times a week.
     
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  19. POPPA ROTZEE Brown Belt

    POPPA ROTZEE
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    Let me get this straight....you've only been training for 3 months and you haven't mastered Jiu-Jitsu yet? GOOD!!! This isn't karate and you aint at Mickey Choi's (I hope) You have the wrong mind set IMO.

    When I went to class and got subbed everyday I was excited. I was excited because I felt the power of jiu-jitsu. I knew that it was real..I knew that there were actual techniques that were defeating me. I've always been athletic won almost all of my street fights as a kid so to come and have less athletic people beat me was awesome. I couldn't wait to learn these techniques.

    If you went into a school with no training and started kicking everyones ass after a week..You would say..what the fuck am I paying these guys for. Be happy your there getting you ass handed to you...your in the right place and they got something to teach you.

    Your subs will come with drills to get the muscle memory..and live or situational training to help you learn when to apply them and how to modify them to fit your style. You'll create your own setups through trial and error. You just need to be aggressive and actually try the submissions. But don't let submissions be the only thing your worried about. Right now you are learning defense and positioning. That is apart of Jiu-jitsu as well..don't overlook it.
     
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  20. Wrestleben Brown Belt

    Wrestleben
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    BJJ is easy. It just takes a really long time to figure that out.
     
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