What are the highest % takedowns/throws/trips etc in MMA? | Page 2

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by BringBackTRTforFairness, Jun 10, 2017.

  1. FutureSergant White Belt

    FutureSergant
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    Highest percent takedowns are:

    *Single leg
    *Double leg
    *Outside trip
    *Bodylock
    *Suplex


    Then for submissions:

    *Rear naked
    *Triangle choke
    *Arm triangle
    *Armbars
    *Guillotine
     
    #21
  2. Uchi Mata Gold Belt

    Uchi Mata
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    A lot of it depends on your preferred clinch positioning. In general in MMA people are getting to the clinch off strikes or up against the fence, and in either case they tend to be looking more for outside position to be safe from knees, uppercuts, etc. Well, it's pretty hard to hit an inside trip from outside position. For those rare guys who look primarily for a straight up Greco style clinch square with their opponent (Fedor being one of them, as he unlike almost anyone else tended to slip strikes to the inside to establish a clinch) the inside trip is there. It's just a much riskier clinch, and it doesn't work very well up against the fence either.
     
    #22
  3. RyanR Brown Belt

    RyanR
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    I'm really surprised there any more ankle picks and knee taps. They're low(ish) energy and relatively safe takedown attempt from the clinch and if it fails you're in no real worse position.
     
    #23
  4. SummerStriker Black Belt

    SummerStriker
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    There are takedowns that I think people need
    People can knee you in the face, so most people don't have the nuts to go for it. You have to do that shit 100% and be the best anyway.

    Jonathan Brookins in TUF 12 went for a couple ankle picks. He at least feinted as if he were going for them, and it was super effective.
     
    #24
  5. SummerStriker Black Belt

    SummerStriker
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    There are throws not on the top list that I think you need.

    I think you need the head and arm throw and the hip throw. Even if they aren't high up on the list, people are vulnerable to them if they aren't well aware of them. If you can't do them and your opponent knows it, they are free to push into you and use sloppy body locks they wouldn't try with someone else. It is a big disadvantage.

    Plus, those throws are great for learning to breakfall.

    Osoto Gari is also good for learning to breakfall. Learning it so that you and your partners can learn to resist it through good posture is important. It is good to learn to do it and take it without breaking your knee off.

    Tani Otoshi is really easy to do. It is good for training break falls, good for learning to keep posture, good as a warning of what can happen, good for countering the hip throw, and some people are vulnerable to it. It also gives you a great takedown you can do on your friends and training partners without suplexing or slamming them.

    Edit: I'm just saying this because usually when people ask about the highest percentage takedowns, they are trying to figure out what they have to do to get good, fast.

    From personal experience, I think the eight moves people need in order to be able to put on MMA gloves and start sparring with takedowns are:

    Double Leg
    Single Leg
    Body Lock
    Outside Trip
    Head and Arm Throw
    Osoto Gari
    Snap Down to Headlock
    Tani Otoshi

    It doesn't hurt to also learn to do ankle picks and the arm spin throw, because they'll help you practice wrestling without strikes.

    I'm not in a class that focuses on takedowns, so when I get the chance to practice, those are the only ten moves I do.

    If you have a real grappling background, like a black belt in Judo or Collegiate Wrestling, there is way more and better stuff you can learn. Any half fit adult can learn the moves on my list though.
     
    #25
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2017
  6. jack36767 Brown Belt

    jack36767
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    Everyone please note Summer striker does not fight or come from a background before taking him too seriously. He tends to like things that will "catch" people or work because it's unexpected and catches people than solid technique


    Not really a criticism, more of an observation and caveat to his "advice". I think that's why he defends the Wolf man. He sees himself
     
    #26
    SummerStriker likes this.
  7. SummerStriker Black Belt

    SummerStriker
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    Yup. I stand by everything I said. If there is something wrong with any of it, please correct me.

    I love Dan because he exposes people on the internet for what they are.
     
    #27
  8. jack36767 Brown Belt

    jack36767
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    Don't feel like breaking it down, simply put, solid fundamentals will always be better than trying things hoping to "surprise" you. And oh really.. you understand that most of the people who criticize him are people who have actually done things.. not just gym warriors at mediocre gyms mostly facing smaller people, and plenty of people would say the exact same things to his face btw
     
    #28
  9. SummerStriker Black Belt

    SummerStriker
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    I'm not talking about being good at fighting. I'm talking about engaging in MMA sparring safely as a beginner.

    I think learning those eight takedowns provide a base for understanding how to conduct yourself in MMA sparring and prevent a great number of injuries people with inadequate training suffer during ordinary situations.

    I'm sure fundamentals are important. I stated in my post that people with true grappling backgrounds are capable of a lot more than me.

    I believe that what I listed can get people in the ring to spar safely.

    So if I'm wrong, I'm overlooking takedowns people need to be safe, or I'm saying a certain move is important when it isn't.
     
    #29
  10. jack36767 Brown Belt

    jack36767
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    "Safety" is entirely dependent on who is teaching and clientele. Way more than what is being taught
     
    #30
  11. SummerStriker Black Belt

    SummerStriker
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    Bleak prospects for the weekend warrior.
     
    #31
  12. ArtemV Red Belt

    ArtemV
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    One of my go-to techniques is an inside trip. I try to get a strong right underhook, push my opponent; wait for them to push back, then I will take a big back/side step with my right (lead) foot, swing the opponent around (so the opponent is almost in a t-suplex position on me; however I am still lower) and it gets me in a perfect position for it. I don't mind the ouchi gari too, but I don't like using this variation in no gi, or giving up and underhook when going for it - like Henry Cejudo does.
     
    #32
  13. ArtemV Red Belt

    ArtemV
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    Part 2: I didn't realize that this was about MMA lol, I guess inside trips could still work with that set up as long as you have strong wrist control/inside bicep control on the other/free hand (of the opponent).
     
    #33
  14. Thycidides Blue Belt

    Thycidides
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    Grappling and mma really isn't something one can get good at by showing up on the weekends. Also, you really should start competing even if its just local grappling tournament. It seems to me if you are an instructor you should have some comp experience.
     
    #34
  15. rmongler Brown Belt

    rmongler
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    Im also a fan of the knee tap for mma application, but one has to know its place to use it most effectively.

    The fact that it does not put you in that bad a position in case of failure is not unrelated to the fact that it can also be defended against mainly through good positioning. See for instance both of Jose Aldo's fights with Frankie Edgar.

    It's a difference i suppose between guys using more 'front loaded' takedowns, who are willing to trade potentially disadvantaging themselves in exchange for a higher likelihood of getting the other guy down in one go.

    Setting up an mma knee tap won't be like setting up a knee tap in grappling, since it will so often be done at striking range, rather than in the clinch. Hence, it works best integrated into a gameplan that is also striking adept, because one can be set up with the other, and if you can anticipate how your opponent will be reacting, you can make them look stupid.

    Basically, if you've got the talent, a kneetap using gameplan is a good way to leverage that talent.
     
    #35
    Last edited: Jun 15, 2017
  16. RyanR Brown Belt

    RyanR
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    Dominick Cruz is IMO one guy who utilizes knee taps very well

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    #36
  17. rmongler Brown Belt

    rmongler
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    Yeah, that's pretty much exactly who i had in mind.
     
    #37
  18. MMACroatia Green Belt

    MMACroatia
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    Some good shit to see here



    Would be awesome to see this one from the other angle.
     
    #38
  19. rmongler Brown Belt

    rmongler
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    Of course theres the old 'step around their leg while moving forward' that even untrained people do instinctually. Just a small, teensy tiny bit of difference in the mechanics when done at an elite level.




    I personally think this is actually a more versatile upper body throw for mma than the classic back heel/greater outer reap, since you can more easily jump right into it even from outside of clinch, as Fedor Emelianenko often showed.

    The one major exception to this rule of thumb is if you're beating up the guy with knees in the clinch with a collar tie (and you better be good at beating guys up with knees in the clinch), and he goes jock to jock to avoid the knees, he is pretty much putting himself in prime position for an osoto (which is probably why such throws are banned in muay thai).

    Back to the step-n-pop though, theres a structurally similar variation you can do up against the cage as well thats super effective; where you grapevine your leg around his leg, then pull it out and around, almost like you're running the pipe, but using your leg instead. I personally call it the broom stick, cause it looks like you're sweeping the ground with the legs, and also cause you sweep him over, geddit.

    Dong Hyung Kim used it in one bright spot in his last fight while otherwise being completely dominated by Colby Covington (who might benefit from cribbing it himself to get guys down against the cage instead of just wall-n-stalling). Demian Maia also uses it (can't recall a specific fight off the top of my head though).
     
    #39
  20. rmongler Brown Belt

    rmongler
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    Speaking of Coving though, he was doing a very good job of getting his head behind Dong's shoulder to attack the back after pushing him up against the cage. That would be perfect position to then transition into the merkel.

    In truth thats probably the real high percentage shit for mma; get them up on the cage, and then work your takedown, having specialized your training for just that situation.
     
    #40

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