Trick to help elbow strikes

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by Silver tongue samurai, Feb 6, 2018.

  1. Silver tongue samurai Ronin

    Silver tongue samurai
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    Found this a while ago and its helped me keep my elbows good as we rarely train them at my gym. All you need is a wall.
     
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  2. AndyMaBobs Purple Belt

    AndyMaBobs
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    Yup! This is how I've done it for a while now.
     
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  3. William Huggins White Belt

    William Huggins
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    Throw an elbow in a manner that is appropriate for the situation, you can generate more power with a wider arch but at the cost of your defense but if your in a position or situation in a fight that allows you to throw it, then throw it!! Technique is always situational, don't be a technique Nazi.
     
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  4. ARIZE Blue Belt

    ARIZE
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    Yeah, I think lots of us follow Sylvie's blog. Her willingness to learn and work on new stuff is remarkable, and even more the fact that she is willing to share. And she learns from "the source", so her tips have weight behind them...
     
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  5. Silver tongue samurai Ronin

    Silver tongue samurai
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    same idea can be applied to a wide arching overhand. Almost everything in fighting is situational, a lot happens in transition i think.

    Also...
     
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  6. Reyesnuthugr belt

    Reyesnuthugr
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    I think for practice (and sparring) you want to have as sharp technique as you can, and work on getting it even sharper.

    Then in a fight (sanctioned or situational defensive scenario) when one's technique naturally tends to become degraded somewhat due to intensity, emotions, etc., you can sometimes have it be imperfect or modify it last minute a little for the situation, and it will still work a lot better than if you had practiced with poorer technique.

    If you had practiced with just okayish mediocre technique in the gym it's likely to degrade even more to the point it may not even work in a more difficult scenario-- which means basically it will actually work against you there.

    We've all seen some laughably horrible technique being done in competition. And you wonder "how is this even possible at this stage?" It's not likely that those guys literally practice it just like that in the gym, it's just that they weren't dedicated to in-depth learning, refining, and polishing and keeping it as sharp as they possibly could in the gym.

    That goes for any/all technique, from any system
     
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    Last edited: Feb 6, 2018

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