Thinking in the ring

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by Davem10, May 11, 2017.

  1. Davem10 Purple Belt

    Davem10
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    Relating to boxing

    How can i develop this other than through time ?

    I struggle to think and im mainly just jabbing and waiting on my opponent to throw so i can slip it, i want to be more aggressive and think how i can get my opponent to open up and trick and trap him but i dont know how

    To the people who have had fights and do think in the ring, what are you thinking when youre in there, what are the thought processes and what are you looking for in your opponent ?

    I would also like to start studying fights because i think this will help, at the minute i just watch fights. If i want to study them to learn how to be creative and think while in a fight what should i be looking at ? Should i watch pretending im fighter A and seeing how i would attack the other fighter ? Anything else i should be looking at ?
     
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  2. Cafecito Negro White Belt

    Cafecito Negro
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    Getting your opponents Timing is key, feints to see reactions distance management and remember to breath.!!

    Best way to describe it without getting into a crazy amount of detail is solving a puzzle. Accept the fact that you will get hit and stay loose. Sorry it's really kinda basic and vague but sometimes keeping it simple is the best, plus your for sure going to get people that will elaborate what I'm saying in a much more detail matter as well. Good luck bro.
     
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  3. biscuitsbrah Black Belt

    biscuitsbrah
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    I find watching a ton of youtube analysis videos helps with fight IQ. Another is just learning from coaches and training partners...

    I dont really call it thinking though because thinking takes time and is generally considered bad while in the ring. (Often accompanied with hesitating)

    Its more like using your knowledge to react to what your opponent gives you imo.
     
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    Last edited: May 12, 2017
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  4. ssullivan80 see....what had happened was

    ssullivan80
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    IMO, you've got to learn to be relaxed in the ring and therefore you want to do your "thinking" outside of the ring. In the ring you want to react instinctively (why developing good vs bad habits early is so important to a fighters development). Instead of thinking inside the ring you want to be "observing" and reacting accordingly but without hesitation (instinctively vs over thinking). That's the concept behind "feeling out" your opponent. What you are really trying to do is find specific reactions, tendencies or patterns and then "download" them to memory. Once you know that you can either elicit or predict a specific reaction from your opponent you can exploit it (use it to your advantage). Ultimately it just takes time and repetition, there is no substitute for experience and that's the only way you truly get relaxed in the ring.

    Here are a couple drills or "mental games" i've used in training that do require thinking, but ultimately helped me learn how to observe an opponent and bait a specific reaction. biscuitsbrah gave you some great advice to use outside the ring (video, talking with coaches, trainers, etc).

    - Shadowboxing : Try to visualize a specific shot or combo that an opponent throws at you (i.e: 1,2) then spend an entire round shadowboxing and using as many different ways as you can come up with to defend and counter that specific shot/combo. Use as many variables as you can conceive, be creative! Try to use a variation of different punches - going forward, backwards, laterally, on the ropes, in the corner, etc...etc..... Start simple, just visualize your opponent throwing a simple jab and spend an entire round shadowboxing how many different ways you can come up with to defend and counter. I start almost all my workouts with 2-3 rounds of shadowboxing using this visualization and it get's me in the habit of "thinking" right away about the task at hand vs just simply going through the motions.

    - Sparring: When you're sparring, take an entire round (or session) and pick a specific shot. Then focus solely on how you can set it up and land it against your opponent. It's not that you limit yourself to only throwing that 1 shot, but you want to focus (think) on how to set your opponent up in order to land that 1 shot clean. Whether it's by using offense (punches to set up your shot) or defense (countering with that shot) you want to be focused on setting up one specific shot. This drill helps to sharpen the tools in your toolbox vs trying to figure out which one to use (over thinking).

    If you've got good sparring partners it's always helpful to talk with them after your sparring session. Whether its a shot you were landing against them or one they were landing on you. Try to have a discussion about the what, why, how that either of you used to find those opportunities. This kind of knowledge is invaluable (hint- take this info then use it in the shadowboxing drill mentioned initially). If I am not to beat up from sparring I always like to do a few rounds of shadowboxing afterwards to cool down. I keep an easy, relaxed pace and focus on what I saw in the ring during sparring. Focusing on both what did and what didn't work.
     
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  5. Davem10 Purple Belt

    Davem10
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    Hey bro, you go ahead and expand more ! It benefits everyone on the forum

    How do you get someones timing ?

    You say its like solving a puzzle, what is the puzzle, what am i looking for ? Am i just looking for gaps and then how i can hit into that gap without getting hit myself ? If that is correct can you give me an example of how this would be done. For example you notice a fighter is liking to lean back to after he throws his shots to make your shots fall short, what would you thinking be if you noticed that ?
     
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  6. Davem10 Purple Belt

    Davem10
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    Yeah im starting to watch more and more fights now

    My first fight is in September and very old for having my first fight (almost 29)

    Im really starting to love boxing though the more i learn. Just with everything in my life i have left it too late to commit so i have missed my shot at being great :(

    So just wanting to learn as much as i can to help improve me as fast as possible to see how far i can get
     
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  7. Davem10 Purple Belt

    Davem10
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    Some great tips there, definitely gave me some things to work with

    Thanks
     
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  8. Davem10 Purple Belt

    Davem10
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    #8
  9. Cafecito Negro White Belt

    Cafecito Negro
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    Sorry for the late reply bro but he's an amazing video that explain the feints to trigger your opponent instead of waiting for shots.



    That's part of my solving a puzzle you want to see how your opponent reacts to certain feints. You don't want to look for openings you want to create them.

    As far as someone leaning back after they throw shots is the only thing going away is his head, the body stays. Go for a straight body shot. Me personally I like to step into his lead with the body and follow up with either a lead hook or rear cross to the head and slip out of danger.

    If you stick to just the body shot tho this will lead to two things: He doesn't learn and you eat up is body with follow up body combos or he starts protecting his body which in turn opens up his high guard to where you can now go overhand shot or lead uppercut. Of course this is all situational and your foot work is also key in this as well. Hope this helps and I'll keep trying to elaborate on everything else I mentioned
     
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    Last edited: May 15, 2017
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  10. Sinister Doctor of Doom

    Sinister
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    What Sully said.

    You should also do more activities that are mental more than physical. Shadowbox with partners, this way you can do your moves without the threat of getting a concussion. Partner drills where you get sequencing, timing, and distance. These things develop the ability to slow fights down...when you can slow them down, you can think better.
     
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