The S&C-related Studies Thread

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by miaou, Dec 11, 2011.

  1. miaou

    miaou barely keeping it together

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    Thanks for providing a paper. I read the full text, and I think what it comes down to is this quote:

    “it appears that jumping performance can be improved through resistance exercise. This may provide some efficacy to resistance exercise for sports performance, as the ability to jump is important across a wide variety of sports and sporting events. However, it is still unclear if a laboratory measure of jumping performance will actually translate to jumping performance in the sports setting.”

    The authors don’t claim that strength training doesn’t result in an improved vertical. They don’t even claim that it doesn’t result in increased jumping ability during the actual sport. They just argue that we don’t really know.

    I don’t find that position compelling. For one, it is illogical that there will be no transfer from a standing or running vertical to jumping on the court. And, for another, it goes against extensive field experience: for instance, a basketball player who shows an increase in his measured standing vertical will typically also show a fairly obvious increase in their on-court jump (he will be ascending higher compared to the rim during a dunk). If you do find it convincing, then that’s up to you.

    On a similar note, the article also refers to the claim that muscle hypertrophy doesn’t contribute to muscle strength. Sure, the relationship between the two is not linear and we don’t fully comprehend it, but to argue the two are unrelated is what I call “intellectual masturbation”. It is simply too contrary to our understanding of the underlying basic science and to extensive field experience.

    Btw, that was basically an opinion piece, published in a journal whose reason for being is to publish unconventional ideas without much scrutiny, just to put them out there for consideration (for instance, the same journal has published aids denyalism papers).
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2018
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  2. Noodles03

    Noodles03 Blue Belt

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    It seems like the more you learn about the science behind strength and conditioning, the more you realize how little you know.
     
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  3. Samuel Reynoso

    Samuel Reynoso Orange Belt

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    I'm not saying the earth is flat. I'm just saying it's funny that we don't really know.
     
  4. spiderguarda

    spiderguarda Orange Belt

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    That’s why I don’t understand Jeremy and company authoring the paper and getting it published. Not sure if it’s a joke or mocking other researchers.
     
  5. Badger67

    Badger67 Taxidea taxus

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  6. aus101

    aus101 Black Belt

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    Depends upon the sport. In powerlifting you bet hypertrophy (usually) equals increased strength and increased strength equals increased performance but for a marathon runner more muscle and more strength might not be so useful. Looking at MMA even physical specimens like Romero perform frequent resistance training, so we can assume it has some affect on even their performance.

    Even for the average joe athlete though. Think about wrestling/grappling, a trained 2.5 bw deadlifter will be able to exert far more force through their body than they would be able to not training deadlifts (or any resistance training). They’ll be far better “athletes” than their sub 2x bw lifting untrained selves.
     
  7. Noodles03

    Noodles03 Blue Belt

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  8. corpse

    corpse Random Belt

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  9. Sano

    Sano Black Belt

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  10. corpse

    corpse Random Belt

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    hey sano,
    no problem with your objection. i just thought it's interesting because i never stumbled across a study where a strength sports world record holder in the super heavyweight class was examined relative to his muscle mass and strength values.

    i also think it's remarkable that the subject has some of the highest values ever reported and the presumption that he is close to the physiological limit.

    i don't read many studies. maybe it's old news for some of you.

    cheers
     
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  11. Queen B

    Queen B Silver Belt

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    Im not sure how the Diet only group led to an increase in RMR. Probably because they werent eating a lot of protein (as protein has the largest thermic effect of all 3 macros)

    The RT and RT+Diet group increase in RMR isnt surprising because muscle burns more energy than fat (by 2-4 calories per pound) and theres probably a small and almost negligible EPOC effectg
     

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