The S&C-related Studies Thread | Page 4

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by miaou, Dec 11, 2011.

  1. Hydroximal Yellow Belt

    Hydroximal
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    He wrote another edition of Low Back Disorders, not sure when it will be available for sale though. I was told next year but I don't know it that's set.
     
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  2. Eric Brown Crusty old bastard

    Eric Brown
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    Olympic Weightlifting and Plyometric Training With Children Provides Similar or Greater Performance Improvements Than Traditional Resistance Training

    Full study available for non-members at this time. Worth the read. Number one reason why I like this study is it is yet another piece of evidence supporting weightlifting for youth lifters.

    "The present results do not suggest that traditional RT should be precluded from RT programs for children. In light of the common misperceptions that high intensity, high velocity, more complex coordinated activities like OWL and plyometrics may be ineffective and lead to injury in children, this study demonstrates the effectiveness of these training modalities"
    -- From Practical Applications
     
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  3. miaou barely keeping it together

    miaou
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    I found this study pretty interesting. Time-to-exhaustion (for subjects cycling on fixed pace to exhaustion) was increased when viewing positive subliminal cues/faces vs negative subliminal cues/faces, and the difference was pretty substantial. Not something "groundbreaking" in terms of coaching practice, but certainly interesting to see controlled study findings on this.

    Here is the study abstract:

     
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  4. LatFlare EADC

    LatFlare
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    I like this:

     
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  5. selfcritical Brown Belt

    selfcritical
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    http://facstaff.bloomu.edu/jandreac/Downloads/class_notes/ExPhys-II/Docherty_and_Sporer_2000.pdf
    A a lit review of the interference effects and how to avoid them in concurrent training. General conclusions were that interference can be most easily avoided by gearing both strength and cardio training toward central rather than peripheral effects. Largest interference effects were predicted when trying to maximize strength training toward cross-sectional area and cardio toward peripheral adaptations at the same time. Apparently this is not heavily researched
     
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    Last edited: Jan 3, 2015
  6. ssdd Purple Belt

    ssdd
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    The link isn't working but looks interesting to me. Does peripheral adaptations in cardio mean localized? Like punching endurance type drills would have a lot of interference with hypertrophy type shoulder training? What is a central strength effect?
     
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  7. selfcritical Brown Belt

    selfcritical
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    I edited the link. Is it working now?
     
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  8. miaou barely keeping it together

    miaou
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    That is a 15-year-old paper postulating a hypothesis and proposing a model for further study. Its goal is to provide guidelines for further study (again, that was 15 years ago), it is not to provide training guidelines.

    Here are some more recent reviews on concurrent strength and endurance training:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17095931 (2006)
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19448698 (2009)
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22002517 (2012)
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24728927 (2014)

    This subject is also briefly touched-upon in the FAQs:
     
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  9. selfcritical Brown Belt

    selfcritical
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    Thanks. I posted that one because it focused more on the outcomes of specific interventions rather than the chemical signaling mechanisms, but I admit that I'm just personally bad at groking the implications of the ampk stuff for practical training for mixed sport.
     
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  10. Viskovitz Blue Belt

    Viskovitz
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    Real Strength Gains from Mental Imagery


    Methodology:

    Results:


    So... May the force be with you?
     
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  11. Badger67 Taxidea taxus

    Badger67
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    We covered a fair amount of this in some of my kin training classes. I'll see if i can dig up the studies and meta analyses of it for your review later on, but the premises was:

    1) Strength training on different days than endurance elicited less negative effects on VO2 max gains and strength/Hypertroyphy. In other words, it can be done efficiently given sufficient rest.
    2) Plyometric training increased strength gains while maintaining most endurance training effects despite a reduction in endurance training [they substituted 33% endurance work for plyo]. This was done in trained athletes. Neural adaptations played the biggest factor in the endurance aspects as there was greater neural output RFD and less "time on contact of ground" during running; they increased 5km performance time by 4% despite less endurance training.
    3) Increase in TSC 1,2 from endurance training reduces mTOR pathways effects for hypertrophy/strength.
    For those who don't know, what this means is that TSC 1,2 is activated during low energy availability or high stress (like in endurance training) and then down regulates protein synthesis.
     
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    Last edited: Feb 24, 2015
  12. Badger67 Taxidea taxus

    Badger67
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    Only managed to find one of the studies on concurrent training and TSC 1,2's role on mTOR. This study wasn't entirely on TSC 1,2 but it does mention it as inhibiting mTOR possibly, and from some of my physiology classes, similar notions have been cited (i will update this when i can acquire the other studies).

    "Activation of AMPK by endurance exercise may inhibit mTOR signaling via
    tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) and suppress resistance-exercise-induced muscle-protein synthesis"
    http://www.8weeksout.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/molecular-responses-to-strength-and-endurance-training-are-they-incompatible-2009.pdf
     
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  13. Badger67 Taxidea taxus

    Badger67
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    "Longer inter-set rest periods enhance muscle strength and hypertrophy in resistance-trained men."
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26605807
    "The present study provides evidence that longer rest periods promote greater increases in muscle strength and hypertrophy in young resistance-trained men."
     
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  14. selfcritical Brown Belt

    selfcritical
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    Just saw that one too. Also one about HR-determined rest intervals producing better hypertrophy
     
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  15. selfcritical Brown Belt

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  16. selfcritical Brown Belt

    selfcritical
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  17. senri The belt that resides inside you

    senri
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  18. Badger67 Taxidea taxus

    Badger67
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    Only read the abstract; did they return to individual baseline resting heart rate or a % of work heart rate?
    Good find btw.
     
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  19. miaou barely keeping it together

    miaou
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    I saw this study the other day when it was posted in a fb group. This was my comment:

    Opposite results from the current "textbook consensus" , small sample (10 subjects per group), measurements on three muscles and only one muscle showing significant differences, the team with the short breaks didn't have any differential effects on muscle endurance (as one might have expected in "resistance-trained" individuals). I'd call this a preliminary study, I don't think one can draw safe conclusions without replication/further evidence.

    My personal opinion, based on the entire existing relevant literature, is that, for contractile protein hypertrophy, the main (if not the only) factor is total long-term training volume performed at or over moderate intensity. Neither rep range, neither exact intensity %, neither between-set break, neither frequency.
     
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  20. Badger67 Taxidea taxus

    Badger67
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    Good take on it. I saw it on a FB post with Dean Somerset and posted it in here because it doesn't fit the typical narrative. I don't have access to the entire study, but i'd be curious to know if they did a power of validity test or not.

    I agree with he long term training volume, i noticed my most significant muscle gains from higher volume during one summer.
     
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