Strategy and Tactics in Fight Sports | Page 2

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by Ilk, Sep 10, 2017.

  1. j123 Pro Sherdogger 500-0-1

    j123
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    lol. Dudes coming to train decked out in 18k gold chains.

    Over here the poser are the guys who gauze up and get someone to help lace them up.

    It is more natural against SP's because you move outside with your lead foot and its the anchor while you pivot around with the rear like a compass, the other way not so much. You can try to look at it like a game, where you do what you can to face your opponent's side or back. How you do it is up to you.

    One of my favorites is (both of us are orthodox):
    • You throw a 1,2
    • partner/opponent retaliates with a jab
    • You move to the outside (as they throw teh jab), and throw a cross immediately AFTER you are planted so you can get power behind it
    This one is kinda of a "dash" step. You do your best to stay just outside the jab (same principles as slipping). Footwork here would be: your lead leg pushes you right as you keep the right leg "light", almost float like in that instance. At the end you should face your opponent almost at a 45 - 60 degree angle.

    [​IMG]
     
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    Last edited: Sep 11, 2017
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  2. Rico Franklin

    Rico
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    Aside from just specific tactics, I'm a firm believer in having a "meta" tactical approach, as well.

    For example, as part of the southpaw master race, I'm huge on establishing the outside angle "advantage" (in quotes because it can be a disadvantage too) against orthos by throwing jabs, double jabs, feints, 1>1>2s, slip 5>2s etc etc until they start to react accordingly of me jumping that side and then I start ripping body kicks at the end of those combos, pivoting back to keep them turning, or slipping/pulling the other way with a power cross etc.

    An ortho example is how SRL used to basically start every fight by just consistently jabbing and circling to the left (obviously by jabbing I mean the million different variations thereof such as doubling it up, body>head, feinting etc) then would base his whole offense for the rest of the fight based off your reactions to that.

    Guess what I'm saying is that there should be a "big picture" tactic as well.
     
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  3. aerius Brown Belt

    aerius
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    Have you tried going left? My boxing coach taught us the importance of direction changes, it's common for fighters to keep moving the same direction and get into stalemates or losing exchanges. So we need to change things to catch the opponent off guard after getting him used to certain habits.

    After stepping right for a while, your opponent will get used to it and expect you to keep doing it. Instead, step/pivot left and you should have a clear path to hit them from the inside angle where they're not expecting it. I liked to throw the lead hook to the body then a 3-2 or 2-3 to the head.
     
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  4. j123 Pro Sherdogger 500-0-1

    j123
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    lol @ this circus freak.

    Y'all should be put in camps

    @AndyMaBobs
     
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  5. TheBookofSpeed The Speed Coach

    TheBookofSpeed
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    One reason that I use and teach angular movement is because I like to fight just one arm if I can get away with it. For example, I will angle to the outside of a right cross. I advance slightly as I angle out putting me inside of his reach while his hand is still moving toward its full extension (if I'm fast enough). This puts his other arm at a distance and body mechanics disadvantage and I have his ribs and the side of his head as close, and open, targets. Same goes for front and side kicks.

    For me, angular movement is more useful as a kicker against a kicker. This scenario really allows you to take advantage of your opponent's forward movement as you angle in which reduces your kick or strikes travel distance therefore increasing the speed of the strike or kick.
     
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