Soreness equals results?

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by Niels, Jun 20, 2018.

  1. MatterOverMind

    MatterOverMind Pulling for you

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    Please don't post again until....

    Well, just never post again.
     
  2. funcrusher2007

    funcrusher2007 champion sound bwoy

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    And why is that.. I could post a million studies that support what I said in layman’s terms .

    Are you seriously advocating low weight high rep for mass gains?
     
  3. Thepaintbucket

    Thepaintbucket Silver Belt

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    There have been many studies by research groups regarding DOMS. The general consensus is that DOMS does not necessarily equal results, if at all any. Adding on to it: If you consistently lift, DOMS are rather minimal. DOMS only happen to me if I take long extended breaks before my next lifting session.
     
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  4. legkicktko

    legkicktko Brown Belt

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    I don't think that's what he means by consistency...

    There is a fair amount of agreement among strength coaches and powerlifting coaches that fatigue seeking routines are deleterious to gains. You will get stronger that way... for a while. But at the very minimum, we do better by training reasonably heavy and avoiding neural fatigue. Going balls to the wall in the gym at every session is not a good way of avoiding neural fatigue or producing long-term strength and longevity, generally (there are always exceptions).

    I agree with you 100% that progressive overload is important (as in progressing in weight/reps). However, consistency is key in terms of establishing intelligent work sets that aren't maximum capacity. Power to the people and Periodization are good reads for understanding strength. Just because something yields results (for a time) doesn't mean its the best route. What TS expressed of seeking soreness is generally accepted as broscience, as is consistently going to failure.
     
  5. Klaavical

    Klaavical Orange Belt

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    this
     
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  6. empsim

    empsim Brown Belt

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    well you also have strength coaches, pro athletes, mr olympias etc. saying you should go as hard as you can. its a matter of proper recovery, nutrition, sleep.

    different things work. whoever says there is 1 correct way of training is talking bs imo.

    depends what you mean by going to failure. for me going to failure is doing as many clean reps without help as I can.
    for other people going to failure means doing as many sloppy reps as they can, then letting their buddy help them to do some more, then rolling off the bench and adding some push ups til they collapse.
     

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