Shoulder pain while benching but not pressing

Discussion in 'Strength & Conditioning Discussion' started by deadshot138, Feb 23, 2018.

  1. Sano

    Sano Black Belt

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    If you're just musing no, if you're implying that's what it is yes.
     
  2. miaou

    miaou barely keeping it together

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    So you think that a supraspinatus injury is definitely the most unlikely, and you also think that the symptoms are not necessarily more consistent with bicipital tendonitis than with a supraspinatus injury?
     
  3. miaou

    miaou barely keeping it together

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    Are you unable to understand English or are you just tripping?

    I wasn't "musing" and I wasn't "implying" anything. I stated that the symptoms described are consistent with bicipital tendonitis.
     
  4. Sano

    Sano Black Belt

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    Let me explain it again. We can keep digging at the mention of the supraspinatus, gracing past the other pathologies it could be besides bicipital tendinitis.

    Not necessarily, as in, we don't have enough information to decide. We have so little information, that it's unreasonable to assume. Yes there is no pain during OHP (which could have been a single rep for all we know, and not enough stimuli to illicit response), therefor if we took that as enough to garner any consistency of symptoms, then it would be less likely the supraspinatus, yet what would necessitate it to be more consistent would be to have more information to make that basis on. Symptoms and stimuli are not well enough described. I pointed out an example where a patient didn't have pain during OHP, yet pain could be reproduced by repeated abduction (and hawkings, neers, so on) and US showed degeneration of the supraspinatus tendon.

    Lol.
     
  5. deadshot138

    deadshot138 Black Belt

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    It wasn’t pain once, I tweaked my form and it went away. Widened my grip to stop my shoulders from internally rotating and also use more of an arch and get up on my traps instead of being flat backed. Also tightened the bar path
     
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  6. Sano

    Sano Black Belt

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    Ah okay I see. Makes sense if something in the front of your shoulder was being irritated a little. Either way, good that it worked out!
     
  7. deadshot138

    deadshot138 Black Belt

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    I had a very exaggerated arc in the bar path. I know it’s supposed to be a slight arc but I was touching the bar below my sternum and pressing it to over the shoulder. All sorts of snap city was happening I’m sure. This is what I love about powerlifting, I am still learning the movements and I’ve been training for years.
     
  8. Sano

    Sano Black Belt

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    Don't think you have to be too worried about snap city stuff going on lol, but yeah definitely cool that you found a way. Yep, always learning.
     
  9. MMA Maine-iac

    MMA Maine-iac Black Belt

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    Had the same issues. Turned out to be an AC joint issue, or "weight lifter's shoulder". Whether true or not, i was told by the specialist that my body frame is not suitable for benching. I have long, monkey arms. So, basically I don't bench anymore, with the exception of weird things like landmine chest presses. Like others have said, seek a specialist to be sure.
     
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  10. corpse

    corpse Random Belt

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    so, if you can press but not bench, chances are it's more bicep than spinatus?
     
  11. deadshot138

    deadshot138 Black Belt

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    The overhead pressing is every work set from 5x5 with 225lbs to my new PR of the 275. Allfather Rippetoe said in his bench press video that impingement is impossible while overhead pressing, which leads me to believe that’s what my issue was. Another pain free bench day, 257.5# for 5, 297.5# for 5 and 335# for 5+ (got 8.). Also a side note, the Texas power bar fucking slays the Rogue Echo bar. Best $270 I’ve ever spent.
     
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  12. corpse

    corpse Random Belt

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    also bill starr or norb schemansky said that when bench press was rarely done, rotator cuff issues were nonexistent. i am happy that you are painfree again. cheers.
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2018
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  13. deadshot138

    deadshot138 Black Belt

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    Thanks. I’ve always been shit at benching, I started lifting through CrossFit and dips were all that were programmed. I’ve added over 100lbs to my max bench in the last couple years, refining my technique and honing my assistance work along the way. I’ve done CF, MMA and Jiu jitsu and I would say powerlifting is the most satisfying of them all.
     
  14. corpse

    corpse Random Belt

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    haha, you are underrating yourself hugely.
     
  15. Legendary

    Legendary Supernova

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    The shoulder is impinged at 90 degress when benching. At the bottom of the lift, move the bar closer to chest to keep the weight off the rotor cuff muscles. Try benching at 75-80 degrees.
     

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