Serious Movie Discussion | Page 28

Discussion in 'Mayberry Lounge' started by Bullitt68, Sep 24, 2016.

  1. Ricky13 You are who you choose to be.

    Ricky13
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    Mentioned it earlier.

    Loved it. One of my favourites from last year.

    (I'm going to start getting worried the more we agree.)

    I'd say more but like you I'm neck deep in the same. Fuck doctorates man. Time wasting sons of bitches.
     
    #541
  2. KOQ24 Silver Belt

    KOQ24
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    i'm way behind on 2016 oscar season films.

    One german TV channel had a western Marathon on Easter weekend.
    Some surprises from the ones i've never seen:

    Man of the West - I guess i should've suspected it being a Anthony Mann-Gary Cooper Western, but this was excellent.Almost revisionist in style with Cooper being the Anti-Wayne again, never a Hero, always realistic.
    The Story is pretty incestuous in a way with Cooper "meeting " his Family again.
    i highly recommend it.

    Hour of the Gun - I didn't like Sturges' more famous Gunfight at the o.k. Corral all that much.
    This is definitely his better Wyatt Earp Film.Probably the most realistic dealing with the Earp-Clanton Gang.It's also what Wyatt Earp should've been, but Costner obviously thought he was "untouchable" after Dances with Wolves.James Garner and Jason Robards were great as Earp/Holliday ,though Sturges should've displayed Holliday's fight with Tuberculosis more prominently.I also enjoy the anti-climactic End of Ike Clanton (Robert Ryan).
     
    #542
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  3. Bullitt68 Senior Moderator

    Bullitt68
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    I've cranked out about 6500 words in the last six days. I figure that's earned me a break. And what better way to spend this bit of free time than in here with this ragtag band of lovable misfit movie nerds :D

    First off, I got to start with how awesome Elle was. I love Arnold and Total Recall rules, but Elle has got to be Verhoeven's best (although I haven't seen Tricked, but you better believe I want to now). The character alone was so much fun to follow through that film, with no small credit for that going to Isabelle Huppert. But the great thing is that it's not just a great character. It's a great character embedded in a fascinating story. Similar to my criticism of Fences, I think Verhoeven might've tried to cram too much shit into this one story (I'm thinking specifically about the father angle), but the principle storyline involving Huppert being attacked and that precipitating our journey into the twisted regions of not only her mind but the minds of those around her, as well, made for immensely enjoyable viewing.

    My biggest compliment to Verhoeven is for the way he was able to deftly switch from extremely visceral tension to sharp and hilarious comedy. There truly wasn't a tone to this movie. It was fluid in a way I've rarely encountered.

    Ricky, when you get some free time, I'd love to hear your thoughts on the film. And, since I always enjoy your dissections of story elements, I'd be especially interested to know what you thought of the way the plot unfolded and whether or not you agree with me that there might've been too much packed into the space of that story.

    How was Keaton's performance? Is it worth me watching it and being reminded how much I miss the Angus bacon and cheese?

    And based on the life of Mr. Blue, Eddie Bunker. I only watched this movie once and it was a long ass time ago, back when I first got into films from the 1970s and was intent on watching everything De Niro, Hoffman, Nicholson, and Pacino ever did, and I was pretty underwhelmed. Not to say that I thought it was bad, I just thought it sounded so cool and Hoffman was such an awesome actor that I was expecting a much better movie than what I got. For me, it sits alongside movies like The Friends of Eddie Coyle, cool-sounding '70s movies that have no excuse for not being much better.

    You don't like Hoffman in Kramer vs Kramer? Tootsie is just stupid all around, but Kramer vs Kramer is a great film and Hoffman is great in it. What problem(s) did you have with him?

    I love the classics, and I love a good classic Western, but I thought this movie was awful. That ridiculous fight scene makes They Live seem too polished and overchoreographed :oops:

    Now this movie is the shit. Unlike you, I actually love Gunfight at the OK Corral. In fact, I think Sturges is the most underrated Western director of all-time. Bad Day at Black Rock, Gunfight at the OK Corral, Last Train from Gun Hill, The Magnificent Seven, Hour of the Gun, and Joe Kidd. That's a hell of a resume, yet it's always Leone, Ford, Mann, Boetticher, and Clint (and sometimes Peckinpah) when it comes to Westerns. You never see Sturges brought up. I've never understood that.
     
    #543
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  4. theskza Silver Belt

    theskza
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    @Bullitt68

    Keaton was fine. Better than the movie. It's still worth a watch.
     
    #544
  5. europe1 It´s a nice peninsula to Asia

    europe1
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    Oh I can't really remember in detail. Maybe I just didn't like the writing of the character. I just couldn't care about the whole parenthood issues of the film (Hoffman taking a fostering role). The whole time I was pretty callously thinking, "get over it". So I guess I just wasn't drawn into the plight of his character.

    The last time we talked about this film I remember you getting mad when I said that I prefeered the wonderful Meryl Streep in it. So I won't point that out again.;)

    I thought Hour of the Gun was really good too. As you said, it has a more realistic, down-to-earth tone.



    Black Rock is awesome but I don't think most people even think about as a Western it since it's set in modern times. And you do love Sturges to an... abnormal degree, with the whole Seven controversy that isn't fit for polite society.:D
     
    #545
  6. JSN Steel Belt

    JSN
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    I really enjoyed Chan Wook Park's the Handmaiden. I bit Rashomonesque.
     
    #546
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  7. chickenluver Bookmobile Driver

    chickenluver
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    That's interesting. I haven't heard this comparison yet.

    I've really got to see this movie.
     
    #547
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  8. JSN Steel Belt

    JSN
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    I don't want to talk it up too much because it's not GOAT or anything, but it is a really good movie. Mulholland Drive might be the best direct comparison. It's its own thing though.
     
    #548
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  9. chickenluver Bookmobile Driver

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    Excellent. I like Mullholland Drive a lot as well.

    I'm hoping I like it at least as much as Oldboy. When I went on a Park Chan-wook marathon I liked all his movies, but was somewhat disappointed that nothing compared with Oldboy.
     
    #549
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  10. JSN Steel Belt

    JSN
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    I like Thirst best.

    I think that he's a bit up and down with quality as well, but luckily he's alternative between 6-7/10 and 9-10/10.

    Definitely one if the best current filmmakers out there.
     
    #550
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  11. chickenluver Bookmobile Driver

    chickenluver
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    We watched Thirst recently for the Sherdog Movie Club

    http://forums.sherdog.com/threads/sherdog-movie-club-week-36-discussion-thirst.3441719/

    Yeah that one is really good. I liked it more the second time I saw it. The two leads are great. My favorite of his after Oldboy.
     
    #551
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  12. KOQ24 Silver Belt

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    Ive Seen all of those except Last Train from Gun Hill.
    Love all of them except Gunfight at the ok corral.
     
    #552
  13. Bullitt68 Senior Moderator

    Bullitt68
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    So I watched Chappelle's two stand-up specials on Netflix last night and remembered, as I was browsing afterwards, that Netflix also has movies. I've been doing a hell of a lot of TV watching and I'm finally ready to go on another movie kick. Tonight I've got a doubleheader to kick things off. First, I'm going to watch The Nice Guys, which I've wanted to see ever since I saw the first trailer, and then I'm going to rewatch Looper, because @Ricky13 brought it up in conversation with me, @Flemmy Stardust, and @europe1 and I realized I couldn't actually participate in that conversation because I barely remembered the film.

    Flemmy, how has Looper held up for you on rewatches? Still awesome?
     
    #553
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  14. Flemmy Stardust King of Lea

    Flemmy Stardust
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    I haven't seen it in a long time, but it was still awesome as of my last time watching. I've seen it several times and it never lost favor in any of those viewings, but it's probably been 2 years now.

    Cool to know that it's on Netflix. I'd be curious to see how it's held up myself.
     
    #554
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2017
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  15. Rimbaud82 Brown Belt

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    Finally got round to watching the Herzog documentary Cave of Forgotten Dreams, which looks at the chuavet cave in France which contains the oldest cave paintings in the world. As well as other interesting things like footprints of humans and animals. He also brings in related archaeological finds from nearby regions. Really interesting presentation of this stuff, so from a purely documentary perspective it was great, but Herzog, as you would expect, also uses the cave as a kind of prompt to explore human existence in general.
    [​IMG]
    Not the sort film you can analyse or discuss in depth since it was a mostly straightforward documentary, but it was fantastic and there some really fascinating discoveries highlighted in the film. I really enjoy listening to Herzog. I didn't know anything about the cave before the documentary either.
     
    #555
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  16. Bullitt68 Senior Moderator

    Bullitt68
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    I ended up getting sidetracked last night after The Nice Guys, so I decided to put off Looper until today. I still wanted a doubleheader last night, though, so after The Nice Guys, I checked out Dirty Grandpa. What a mixed fucking bag of movies.

    The Nice Guys kind of stunk. There were some cool and funny parts, but anything good about The Nice Guys felt like leftover good shit from The Last Boy Scout. Shane Black was digging deep into his trunk of "I did this once and people thought it was cool" but that can't sustain a movie. Crowe was cool enough to have deserved a much stronger character and Gosling was funny enough to have deserved a more coherent arc. And the plot basically just ripped off Lethal Weapon and replaced mercs smuggling drugs with Kim Basinger and something vaguely political.

    Compared to Dirty Grandpa, however, The Nice Guys was a fucking masterpiece. I love De Niro, I will watch him in literally anything, but Dirty Grandpa was an enormous piece of shit. Shockingly so. I would never have expected De Niro being in a movie to be so ineffectual against a negative judgment, but the script was that fucking bad. Just that opening at the funeral, I knew instantly that if De Niro wasn't in that movie I wouldn't have made it five minutes. But I powered through and watched the whole thing and it was just garbage. Cheap, infantile, pointless garbage. It hurts me to say that about a movie starring Robert De Niro, but sometimes the truth hurts.

    Don't worry, though, @Flemmy Stardust. I have no vitriol for Looper. I may not have remembered much about the movie itself, but I do remember thinking after I first watched it that, for as great as it was, something seemed to be missing. I didn't know if it was my expectations or what, but the way everything clicked for you, that's not the way it worked for me. This viewing, totally different story. I actually thought it was much better. Everything clicked for me on this viewing. It's a brutal fucking story, I feel for every last character, but Willis' arc is just heartbreaking. I wasn't expecting to see Emily Blunt (this was probably the first time I'd seen her in anything, and when the movie faded in my memory, her character faded, too, and I wasn't even able to go back and put two and two together) and I forgot the poor bastard who introduces us to The Rainmaker was Garret Dillahunt, both pleasant surprises to add to the mix.

    That said, @Ricky13, I'm still sticking with the Logan hotel scene over the Dillahunt scene. It's kind of unfair, though, because I was so much more invested in Jackman's and Stewart's characters than in any of the characters on that farm. All that emotional mileage, it's going to carryover so much to each scene, and you add on top of it how cool the scene was in general and it runs away with it. Nevertheless, in terms of reveals, I think The Rainmaker's reveal is much better than Laura's reveal because, even though you know where it's going (i.e., you know you're dealing with The Rainmaker), you don't know what you're going to see when it gets there. You know the Wolverine deal. Yeah, when it gets confirmed and you see this little girl fucking people up with her Wolverine claws, it's bad ass, but the bad ass-ness has a totally different dynamic. With The Rainmaker, you really don't know much at all. You know, thanks to Blunt taking cover in that safe, that whatever it is it's serious shit, but you don't know what the name means or what his deal is. With the slow-motion and him falling down those stairs, it's like the fucking Hulk. You're ramping up because you know Dillahunt made him angry, and then when you finally get it, the cherry on top is getting to hear Willis whisper it. The Laura reveal is pretty much exhausted in, "Little girl Wolverine! Awesome!" The Rainmaker reveal has so much more behind it and the reveal itself has so much more to it, it's just a different beast.

    Now I'm going to get some dinner and watch Kevin James in True Memoirs of an International Assassin. I remember thinking the trailer looked good. Here's to hoping the movie lives up to it.

    Perhaps the film seems dated now? After all, a woman walking out and leaving a dad to raise his kid doesn't really make for a movie plot in 2017. In 1979, it's quite a different story.

    [​IMG]

    If polite society can't recognize the superiority of The Magnificent Seven to The Seven Samurai, then polite society can...

    [​IMG]

    What didn't click for you with Gunfight at the OK Corral? I thought Douglas killed it, as he always does, and Lancaster was a commanding Earp.
     
    #556
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  17. KOQ24 Silver Belt

    KOQ24
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    <{1-6}>
    One of the most godawful movies i've seen last year.
     
    #557
  18. ufcfan4 Can't Andle The Riddum

    ufcfan4
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    Cool that you mention Lethal Weapon as I've been re-watching the series. I have to say that the second one is almost definitely my favorite, even though I think the series held up as entertaining for all four movies, which is pretty rare.

    I ended up actually being a bit more disappointed with the first one than I expected. I hadn't seen either 1 or 2 in years and years, and I think I had this built up vision that the original is the definitive Lethal Weapon movie and the others are varying levels of successful derivations of that initial formula. But I found it to be a bit clunky and uneven. Other than Gibson delivering an awesome performance, the unique nature of his character's mental state, and the good chemistry with Glover, I didn't really find the narrative itself that engaging.

    I think where it suffered was in comparison to the sequel, which I found superior in virtually every way except one: hand-to-hand combat choreography which is certainly more prominent and superior in the first film. Otherwise though, better humor (Pesci, Glover's face when he sees the upshot of his daughter's commercial, etc), better chemistry between the already established main duo, much much better villains, as I found Joss Ackland's South African diplomat storyline far more digestible than the dull general in the first film and found the lead henchman to be at least as good as Busey's menacing but one-note character. So yeah I'll just end it with saying that I consider Lethal Weapon 2 to be one of those sequels that is superior to its predecessor.

    As for the Nice Guys, I really liked the setting/time period, the atmosphere of it, particularly at that decadent party that may have been the best sequence in the film as far as I can think of. Gosling was hilarious. That moment where he falls over the balcony, rolls down a hill, encounters a corpse, only to do a Lou Costello-esque wheezing freak-out reaction had me laughing in the theater. He and Crowe were a good pairing. That's the type of tough-guy with depth role that Crowe could play in his sleep at this point, but it was still a solid performance. I also thought the precocious daughter was pretty good, which is noteworthy since it's usually so easy to bungle those types of kid characters and make them obnoxious.


    Biggest gripe I have with the film was the disparity between the first half and the second in terms of my level of enjoyment. I do not have this experience often, but the Nice Guys was definitely an example of a movie where I felt that the first half was significantly better than the second. As such, I could feel a palpable shift in the momentum of the movie around the point where Gosling was hallucinating in the car. Although there was some cool action toward the big denouement, I still felt as though the film had lost a good amount of steam.

    Didn't have any interest in it. I thought the trailers looked awful. One of my problems with it was that it seemed so gimmicky. I remember watching the Red Band and thinking that it was painfully clear that they were basing the whole appeal of their film on the notion that legendary actor DeNiro was saying vulgar things and hurling expletives. DeNiro is a great actor but he has shown that even he can't elevate subpar or outright shitty films through his work alone.

    As far as Efron comedies go, though, I did see the raunchy and stupid Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates, but I will say that I enjoyed it. There's a lot of lameness, a lot of material that seems redundant from past comedies, but there's also some hilarity. Devine, Efron, Kendrick, and Plaza were pretty funny and it was cool to see Stephen Root there as well.
     
    #558
  19. Rimbaud82 Brown Belt

    Rimbaud82
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    [​IMG]
    Just watched The Spirit of the Beehive, a Spanish film from 1972, and I absolutely loved it. It unfolds at a gradual pace, but doesn't feel slow or laboured at all. A brilliant representation of childhood innocence and wonder in the face of the 'grown-up' world, there is also the backdrop of Franco's Spain and the cracks left by the civil war but mostly it's not explicit. The cinematography and soundtrack were both outstanding as well, which added to the poetic and dreamlike nature of the film. I read the cinematographer was going blind as well, which is even more remarkable!
     
    #559
    Last edited: May 1, 2017
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  20. BVG Red Belt

    BVG
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    I started watchin Ray Donovan. Has a Sopranos kind of vibe to it, if anything it has a great ensemble cast.
     
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