Official Judo Thread XI: Olympic Travesty Edition | Page 42

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by Zankou, Aug 6, 2016.

  1. Kbits Orange Belt

    Kbits
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    Yeah, I've never seen sankaku like this. It looks aces.

    As you know, sankaku is usually from the front , which I hate doing. It always feels like I'm going to roll an ankle doing it. Plus it results in a tangle of limbs that make it difficult to transition out of. To be fair, my irrational dislike of it may be blinding me some here :) I can and do use sankaku from guard a fair bit (or did....might have to give it away now due to knee).

    I think this sort of entry would work well (pedagogically) with the Bischof roll series, as both of them are reliant on swinging a shin under yourself, momentum transfer etc. Seeing I taught them the Bischof, they should hopefully pick this up faster.
     
    #821
    Last edited: May 9, 2017
  2. Thycidides Blue Belt

    Thycidides
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    Thanks. What is it about the angle and opportunity of seionage that is wrong; and how what would be a good way to improve foot speed and stepping? My gym offers a Mauy Thai class; would it be worth it do do that to get better at footwork and moving around?

    It sounds like my main problem is general lack of fitness and coordination more so than anything related to judo...
     
    #822
  3. Russky Blue Belt

    Russky
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    Judo takes long time to develop. There are no shortcuts. You need at least 1000 mat hours of practice to get something that does not look bad.

    On your video your posture is bent over. This kills your speed and ability to attack. Neither seoi, nor sacrifice throws work when your opponent is upright and you are bent over. It should be the opposite. That's why you fall down and your opponent is still standing. Fix your posture, this will fix your foot speed and coordination.

    Bent over posture is natural for beginners. They do not like being thrown and they think more about defense. They are trying to attack with some big throw like osoto or seoi. When they get more experience they get more comfortable with falls, and start attacking with footsweeps they get more upright. They still stick their butt out for defense time to time. Really good posture starts when they are able to read opponents and counter their attack.
     
    #823
  4. Kbits Orange Belt

    Kbits
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    You attack at the wrong time, in the wrong direction and without commitment

    Plyometrics and solo footwork drills. Good article here...second video especially for you

    http://beyondgrappling.com/solo-judo-drills-improve-judo/



    No.

    You're biggest problem appears to be reading comprehension and/or trying to find magic bullets :)

    Do the footwork drills every day for 15 minutes for the next 30 days. Post a video now and then in 30 days. We'll talk after that.

    (Or don't - you're a grown ass man and can make your own choices )
     
    #824
  5. Thycidides Blue Belt

    Thycidides
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    thanks for the video, that was what I was looking for actually. A month is actually a fast amount of time for me to see improvement. I will work on that footwork in my own time.

    I probably will post another video of myself and update the thread with my progress. After all I did post a video back in March and I posted one in April as well. And the video of me haplessly falling down is from October I think.
     
    #825
    Last edited: May 9, 2017
  6. Kbits Orange Belt

    Kbits
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    Lots of good drills here using fitball and BOSU (note the drill @ 1:10, among others)


    Using a step


    And an agility ladder with uchikomi (hers is not so good...)


    Pick several of these and do them along with the ashiwaza that D'aquino shows. Keep doing your uchikomi in class. In 2-3 months, your footwork speed will improve tremendously.
     
    #826
  7. Kbits Orange Belt

    Kbits
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    Hey @BKR

    I've got a problem and I need some help figuring it out.

    How do you encourage people to develop good randori? Right now, we seem to have the following problem

    * Beginners get taught throws
    * They build up speed and power on the crashmat, uchikomi, moving uchikomi etc

    But then, when they do randori....they often end up doing weird and stupid things and hurting each other. I've seen too many knees go twang over the past few years and I want to put a stop to this.

    IOW, "do good randori" is taught by osmosis...and not all of them get it as they move up the ranks. Then when the hit the intermediate class, they end up fucking each other up.

    I want to be explicit as to what randori is (ie: not shiai, keep your partner safe etc).

    Myself and one of the other assistants are taking time and trouble to demonstrate throw for throw (French) randori. I'm also spending a fair bit of time on ukemi drills. I'm also giving a 1-2 minute spiel at the start of the randori phases as to why we are doing this, what not to do etc.

    Are there any other steps? I'd be pretty happy if I could get them to do good French randori without someone fucking something up.

    As I see it, there are a couple of different types of randori that need to be taught to beginners before getting to the heavier stuff

    * Throw for throw (French): uke ONLY defends by moving. Swap uke/tori roles every minute
    * Footsweep only randori (once they're better)
    * Final phase before moving onto real deal: gripfighting randori with fit-ins
     
    #827
  8. RJ Green Black Belt

    RJ Green
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    throw-for-throw is great! i think kumikata-only is good too. a lot of people sleep on it and then as they progress can't figure out why they can't get throws going.

    directional uchikomi/nagekomi is huge too. having people go around the square and practice tokuiwaza in all directions is really helpful for developing entries.

    beginners have two problems i've noticed consistently: they'll throw in randori the way they practice uchikomi, so if they do a lot of pick-up-and-stop they won't have any follow-through on their throws. they're also limited to throwing either moving forward or backing up, rather than being able to throw to all corners of the compass.
     
    #828
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  9. Kbits Orange Belt

    Kbits
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    Went to visit a friends club tonight to do some training. The beginners did French randori flawlessly. There's something to be said about training in the traditional way.
     
    #829
  10. Mcmoon Green Belt

    Mcmoon
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    So last night my instructor informed me and a few other guys that he is holding a promotion test in August I believe after a little in house tournament. I will be testing for my brown belt finally. I do however have to learn the nage no Kata which has me a little worried.


    After 6.5 years I am finally progressing again somewhat.

    Note: not all those years have been judo or at the same place. 2.5 bjj/mma, 3.25 years a one judo club and about .75 at the current one.
     
    #830
  11. QingTian Purple Belt

    QingTian
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    I'm a big fan of randori where one person can only evade through movement (suteigeiko or something like that). I think the problem with poor randori (not just beginners too) is that many people never learn to mind their own posture and how to use small changes to disrupt a throw. It's not hard to do, but many people just never learn the concept. Once you do you become hard to throw even without grips, and the other person gets to practice without unproductive resistance.
     
    #831
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  12. RJ Green Black Belt

    RJ Green
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    absolutely. it really sucks to see the lower rank try to play counter-randori where they spend the whole time ass-out trying to stop any throws coming in. and i get that when you start out you're counting your wins and trying not to get tossed on your ass, but it really sucks when people play defense the whole time or refuse to throw so they don't get countered.

    i've been trying to get better about taking falls for decent throws. i used to always counter or round off out of things, but a lot of people just stopped trying to throw me altogether. now if they get decently low or put good effort into things i'll go over.

    i'm not saying to just fall for any dogshit, but i think some people get so discouraged early on not being able to catch people with timing and technique that they just give up altogether.
     
    #832
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  13. Kbits Orange Belt

    Kbits
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  14. Thycidides Blue Belt

    Thycidides
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    I have this problem too. A couple of the people I train with play very defensively. But

    On the other hand others overcompensate for a lack of timing and coordination and try to power through me with everything they have, which is kind of funny because they weigh more than I do by over 20 pounds and are several inches taller.


    In randori what do you guys do against people bigger than you?
     
    #834
    Last edited: May 17, 2017
  15. Kbits Orange Belt

    Kbits
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    If light and fast: crush and control

    If heavy and slow: move and tire out
     
    #835
  16. Thycidides Blue Belt

    Thycidides
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    Do you use different grips depending on size too? It feels like the standard sleeve and lapel grip doesn't work so well against taller and heavier people.
     
    #836
  17. RJ Green Black Belt

    RJ Green
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    it'll depend on the throw. you really wanna stick with the orthodox grip above the elbow - if you're low on the sleeve and they've got long arms, you'll waste most of your kazushi just getting their arm straightened out. if you rely on a collar grip, you'll bring them forward but you won't get the turn that you do off of an elbow grip.

    as a developing judo player it's really good to force yourself to play with the orthodox grip before switching to other fancy grips.

    on considerably taller people it'll help if you grip a bit lower on the collar. gripping too high can cause you to overextend, which can reduce power.
     
    #837
  18. Kbits Orange Belt

    Kbits
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    Well, I do, yes. For shorties, I'll take a deep over the shoulder or back grip.

    For tallies, I try to control a hip and a wrist. The closer you can get their hand to the ground, the better. You can also do double wrist,

    OTOH, there's something to be said about learning to adapt the same grip to different heights.
     
    #838
  19. Thycidides Blue Belt

    Thycidides
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    I can generally get back, double wrist or belt grip on most people in randori, but I don't always do so and I don't know if I should. I can move the person around more and even throw them but it isn't clean or pretty when I do so. When I do this I tend to overcommit as well and end up throwing myself. This happens when I try koshi garuma or sumi gaeshi

    On the other hand if I try a standard grip I mostly just get stuffed and its very tedious. This happens when I do seonage.

    I probably should ask my training partners not to resist so much
     
    #839
    Last edited: May 19, 2017
  20. deevlash Purple Belt

    deevlash
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    So that post was September 2015. Just got back on the mat for some light Randori the other night after 3 surgeries all in, the initial reconstruction, the debridement and then another to clear out some more infection. Felt good to get back to it although at 35 I reckon it'll have to be masters if I ever actually compete again. Still, finally back!
     
    #840
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