Kitchen Knives

Discussion in 'Dieting / Supplement Discussion' started by ss4vegeta1, Aug 28, 2009.

  1. ss4vegeta1

    ss4vegeta1 Blue Belt

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    Anyone know a really good brand name of knives?
     
  2. ronin0352

    ronin0352 Lift, Eat, Sleep, Repeat

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  3. ss4vegeta1

    ss4vegeta1 Blue Belt

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  4. josevergas

    josevergas Yellow Belt

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    Be careful with the Henckels - many of them are now made in China and are of lesser quality. It should say on the knife.

    That's not to say China can't produce a good product but in this case Henckel (like many companies) is using them to produce a lower quality product to sell cheaply.

    The good Henckels are decent knives and what might be considered the reference point for knives - that is, many are worse and quite a few are better. If you go into a good kitchen store you should find some good brands but if you go to a place Sears you're likely to Henckels as their top knife. (I'm not actually sure what Sears has - it was an example).

    You don't need a full set so just buy a couple good knives. I have a 10" chef and 4" paring knife from Global. I like them a lot but they use the Japanese style for the blade so they can't be sharpened in a generic sharpner. They are at least as good or better than the Henckels, IMO. My friend has Shun which I like a lot too. Wusthof are great too.

    check out the internet like:
    Chef's Knives Rated - Equipment & Gear - Cooking For Engineers
    Best Kitchen Knives On Any Budget | Cheap & Professional Chef Knife Set Review



    Hope that helps.
     
  5. DrBdan

    DrBdan Something clever

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    When my sister got married last year she put some Henckel steak knives on her gift registry and her husband made sure they were the high quality German ones. I've used them and they are very nice. I don't know what the price/quality difference is between those and Spanish or Chinese ones but if price isn't a big deal I would recommend them.
     
  6. Five by Five

    Five by Five Orange Belt

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    I'm with Jose Vergas: Global, hands down GLOBAL. Best value for the money out there. Comparable to any chef's knife i've used (wusthof, henckels, chicago cutlery, calphalon, etc...). There are certainly better knives (in terms of keeping an edge), but none that can be had for these prices. Also sold at Bed Bath and Beyond so you can use that 20% off coupon they send out so often.

    I own an 20cm chef, bread knife, and a 10cm paring knife and love them. Make sure to buy a sharpening steel as well to keep the edge true. I also use a ceramic sharpener on it which seems to work well..but global sells whetstones which are probably a better option.
     
  7. Tom Kazanski

    Tom Kazanski ChristianCore

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    Make sure you by a sharpening stone and take care of them. Don't put them in the dishwasher, clean after use, stuff I'm sure you know but that should be pointed out anyways. Remember, more accidents happen with dull knives than sharp!
     
  8. PoppaKap

    PoppaKap Yellow Belt

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    I really, really like Shun Classics. The fit and look are great. They hold an edge great and are very sharp. I sent them to a specialty knife sharpener and they are better than when I got them. Noone uses one without commenting.

    KAI USA : Shun Search Results
     
  9. Loomy

    Loomy Purple Belt

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    wusthof and zwilling chef's knife is basically the same. (henckles also makes a stamped knife that I'm not talking about) classic high end german knife. durable.

    global and shun are more specialty asian knives. different edge configurations. more money. not necessarily better, nor durable. not necessarily a great starter knife.

    kyocera, etc, ceramic knives. looks like plastic, feels like glass. keeps an edge longer, but needs to be mailed off to be sharpened. much more brittle than metal. white can probably stain.

    sharpening a knife means putting a new edge on with a stone. it is hard to do well and is easy to screw up. the little sharpening roller stone devices makes it easier. it needs to be done yearly at most for most people.

    steeling a knife means aligning the burrs of the existing edge with a special steel rod. this is much easier to do. it should be done before you use the knife. it makes a noticeable sharpness difference.

    you want a sharp knife because dull knives are unpredictable and that means mistakes that cut you. one second the dull knife is moving slowly, the next it slips, moving quickly, and your finger is gone.

    you probably only need one good general purpose knife. the rest of your knives can be cheap if you want.

    if you cut no bones and mostly vegetables, you might like a vegetable knife (santoku, etc) more than a chef's knife. the blade on a vegetable knife is thinner so you can cut vegetables smaller and more precisely. it is also taller so you can scoop up more cut vegetables to put them somewhere else. don't underestimate this convenience if you cut a lot of shit. it is for this reason that some people like giant chinese cleaver-looking things for cutting vegetables.

    just like with pots and pot sets, single knives are a ripoff compared to knife sets. yet if you only end up using one knife from the $250 set, getting the one you use for $100 is still better than for $250...

    I recommend using whatever knife you plan to buy before you buy it. cut up a staple item with it. onion is the most technical because it needs a sharp tip, thin edge, good cutting action control.

    good luck and have fun.
     
  10. ronin0352

    ronin0352 Lift, Eat, Sleep, Repeat

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    I do own a set of Henckels, and I love them. I had one that my wife put in the bottom of the sink and then stacked a bunch of shit, including 3 cast iron skillets on. It cracked because of the weight and the curve of the bottom of the sink and when I went in to buy a replacement (forgetting about the warranty completely since it was completely my wife's fault) they replaced it free without question. They also give free sharpening for life, if I remember right it's limited to once or twice a year. A steel should keep it sharp enough in the mean time.
     
  11. fat_wilhelm

    fat_wilhelm Black Belt

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  12. me>you

    me>you Brown Belt

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    I posted this on another forum for someone...

     
  13. ss4vegeta1

    ss4vegeta1 Blue Belt

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    me>you's avatar pic and this thread LOL. Patrick Bateman.
     
  14. Art_Wanderlei

    Art_Wanderlei Brown Belt

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  15. Andy1983

    Andy1983 Guest

    I just bought a set of Henkel Classics. Decent knives, the ones made in Spain. We were gonna buy a 4 star Chefs and Bread knife, but it was only a tad more for the whole set, and for a bonus they threw in 4 steak knives.
     
  16. Graves

    Graves ******WTF Belt****** Platinum Member

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    got some knives from Cold Steel that rule
     
  17. Urban

    Urban Savage Mystic

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    I've been impressed with my wustoff grand prix's. Kershaws are nice, but I find the blades break down too easily, and I worry that henckels have made a concession in quality to lower their costs (they now produce stamped blades). Though I have a very fine 10" forged chef's blade from them that is holding up quite nicely under a variety of abusive situations (from the madhouse to the firehouse to my house) without showing any serious signs of wear. The most important thing in a kitchen knife is comfort. any knife can be sharpened (repetitively if the edge breaks down) but a thousand dollar blade will sit in the drawer/on the rack unused if it's not commfortable for you. Try them out in a store, and stay away from knife sets since they often hide shitty and unused knife types among one or two good knives to sell the set.

    Wustoff, Henckel, and Kershaw (shun) make good forged blades, and I tend to prefer them in that order. I don't like ceramic blades because they lack the proper heft and balance to me (and I don't like the idea of dropping my knife and seeing it chip or break).

    Knives to keep on hand:
    - a forged chef's knife (my preference is a 10-12") or a santoku (which would probably be a 7-8" knife) based on your personal preference. FORGED not stamped, this makes a HUGE difference and is the EXACT reason cold steel doesn't make my list for this category. Keep it sharp and this knife will do 90% of your work in the kitchen. TRY IT OUT before you buy it, and don't leave and buy the same knife online for less. Yes you CAN do that, but if everyone does that, there won't be any knife shops left. pay a couple extra bucks and support local business. This will run you 80-140 bucks depending on the knife and store.
    - A stamped fillet knife. I picked mine up for less than 20 bucks at a restaurant supply store. Played with a couple, and found one that was long enough, flexible and comfortable. Stamped is acceptable here because it's going to be thinner than forged, more flexible, and doesn't need weight to do the job it's going to do. If you WANT a forged fillet knife, the Wusthoff grand prix II series has a great one. Cold steel's boning knife may be acceptable here, but I have never played with it.
    - Stamped serrated bread knife. Again, I picked this one up at the restaurant supply store. Stamped because it's cheaper, and its use doesn't require weight (bread and tomatoes aren't the most fibrous foods to cut in the kitchen). Mine has an angled handle, and I reccomend that so you can saw all the way down to the cutting board.

    That's it for essential knifes. Get a sharpening steel or honer and learn how to use it and you should be set for the next 50 years in the kitchen.

    Additional knives
    - Slicer - this is the only knife that actually needs those little grooves in the blade to keep food from sticking. You don't need them in your chef's knife or santoku or anything else. Your slicer should be 12-14 inches long and is for disassembling primals and subprimals... large cuts of meat. Handy to have, not essential. Similar to this but that one seems a bit extreme in length. Buddy of mine uses a Cimeter that he likes a lot, but I find it's mostly a matter of preference.

    - Kitchen shears. They don't need to do EVERYTHING. All they need is to be able to come apart for cleaning, and make sure they're sturdy with a bone cutting notch in them. Spring loaded isn't neccessary either. Mine were made by good grips. Very nice for butterflying whole chickens.

    - Electric oscillating knife. I like mine, some people call it cheating, but it really only gets used when there's a turkey or a watermelon that needs to be cut apart. they're all basically the same

    - Steak knives, ok, not usually considered on this list but something should be said about them. I LIKE serrated blades on mine, in fact my cutco set is my favorite set of steakknives I've ever used. I also like this little diddy from cutco but by and large am not impressed with their products.

    - Paring knife - get a cheap one (or several) or get a ceramic one that will last a lifetime IMO. either way it's not that important of a knife to me. I almost NEVER use mine.

    That should just about cover it.
     
  18. Urban

    Urban Savage Mystic

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    I didn't go over vegetable or meat cleavers, but I have limited experience with them. some people SWEAR by asian style veggie cleavers as their go to knife in the kitchen. The few times I've played with one though, I've always found myself wishing for my chef's knife.
     
  19. Zero_Sen

    Zero_Sen Shodan

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    This is a great brand.

    After buying low-end knife sets and replacing them annually, I took some advice from a chef friend of mine and invested in a high-end Henckels santoku.

    It's a really versatile knife, so if you don't have the money to get a full higher end set it should be the one you buy.

    Over time, as you get the cash, you can buy more and expand your set.

    Definitely a case of quality over quantity.
     
  20. Golden Child

    Golden Child White Belt

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    Henckel make sure you get the "Twins", the logo will have two interconnected 'men'. These are the better line from the various specimins I have seen.

    I have the Henckel Twin Cuisine knives. 10" Chef, 10" Santoku, 8" slicer, 8" bread, paring, utility. Along with a steel. I also have a 'birds beak' Shun.

    My friend has a nice set of Globals and a Shun Chef's and Santoku and both feel bad to me. Too light, too fragile feeling. The Twin Cuisine are fucking swords.

    I would advise NOT to sharpen your own knives if you purchase some nice ones. Paying some dude $25 a year is well worth it. Nothing worse than a screwed up edge because you held the blade at the wrong angle or you let your sharpening stone get a curve in it.

    *Edit* I agree with Urban on the steak knives. I have a few Cutco's and they are excellent for what they do. A nice, serrated steak knife is a winner. And GET the serrated ones, a straight edge will just get destroyed cutting on ceramic plates and be useless pretty quickly. The points of the serration will take the abuse and protect the edge inside the curve of the teeth allowing a long-lasting edge.
     

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