Just a friendly service reminder of natural disasters around the world. | Page 3

Discussion in 'The War Room' started by mcveteran81, Sep 13, 2017.

  1. spritzlackieren Yellow Card

    spritzlackieren
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    Holy shit, how did I miss this? Poland here I come! Vacation time!
     
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  2. PrinceOfPain Silver Belt

    PrinceOfPain
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    South Africa's in the middle of the worst drought in a century.
    https://www.iol.co.za/news/south-af...t-three-years-to-recover-from-drought-9362128
     
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  3. fallable Brown Belt

    fallable
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    Yeah, that's true, good point.

    Another reason why hurricanes and storms are having more impact, especially in places like Florida, the Bahamas, and the Caribbean is because of the destruction of the coastal mangrove systems. Mangroves act like a surge protector against storms. Just like when storms slow down when they make landfall, mangroves cause the same effect. Mangroves also protect the shoreline, trap sediment, and combat erosion. When they are removed more erosion takes place and there becomes less material to protect against storm surges. A lot of mangrove habitat has been converted to beachfront property in recent times. Where there once was natural storm protection, there are now developments that are at risk in these circumstances.

    That's true, I didn't think of the insect plague angle. At least these beetles don't have scorpion stingers.

    What is your opinion on the insects from Revelation being some kind of nanobot?

    Good post. I forgot to mention sudden oak death, it's not as big of an issue where I'm from, but is having devastating effects on coastal regions. It's also another great example of an introduced invasive. It is believed to come from Asia and our trees aren't adapted to it. The devastation of SOD also goes hand in hand with drought and bark beetles. Trees weakened by drought are more susceptible to SOD and trees infected SOD have less ability to fight off the effects of beetles. It's a perfect storm.

    Another thing to consider is that the SOD infects many smaller woody plants. These woody plants form the underbrush of the trees and forests and act as hosts. Big oak trees with thick bark, especially those in places like California where it's a natural part of the ecosystem, have much better defenses against wildfires. Whereas small woody plants are more likely to be consumed. By un-naturally restricting wildfires and allowing underbrush to grow out of control, we are providing SOD with more hosts, easier means to spread, removing one very effective natural defense mechanism of the forest, and thus we are unwittingly contributing to the spread of the SOD disease to trees. When a shrub is consumed by fire other shrubs grow back even better within a few years. When a 300 year old oak tree dies of SOD or bark beetle it's 300 years to replace.

    Where I'm from the main method to combat beetle spread is quarantine. Infected wood is not supposed to be transported, and should either be chipped to 2.5 cm or covered with a tarp and sealed of any escape routes. It's also recommended not to trim certain types of trees in summer because more sap leaks in warmer temperatures and the sap leakage attracts beetles.

    As far a biological control agents, I know they are doing some research in this area. For another invasive beetle from Asia effecting the east coast, they found a parasitic wasp that preys on the beetle and no other types of insect, so it got the green light for introduction. But I'm unaware of any similar developments for our problem species here in California as of yet.

    It's interesting to see these types of situations popping up all over the world and considering what new developments will arise in the future. People literally want no borders and free travel when it's almost guaranteed that would lead to devastating environmental consequences. But SOD and invasive bark beetles never seem to come up in that conversation.
     
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    Last edited: Sep 14, 2017
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  4. AviatorShades Yellow Card

    AviatorShades
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    If we didn't get 2 hurricanes in the US nobody would know/care about any of the rest of this stuff though. The awareness level is what's changed.

    This year doesn't seem that bad as far as west coast forest fires go. Pretty normal.
     
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  5. Giblert I'm still not surprised

    Giblert
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    A lot of good points in here. The coastal redwoods are another example of being extremely fire resistant due to the thicker bark. Since they dominate their ecosystems both above ground and below it's easy to see why this came to be in an area with a solid natural fire season.

    I can't help but see a comparison between the modern need to fight wildfires due to population spread (causing the buildup of fuels as you mentioned) + the ongoing destruction of the extensive mangrove ecosystems due to population spread, and other primary and secondary effects of engineering nature to facilitate changing population concentration. First that comes to mind is creating massive reservoirs by damming rivers which messes with the natural hysteresis/buffer function of flood plains both up and downstream, as well as extreme restriction of ground moisture retention downstream (I don't think this is the scientifically accurate terminology but hopefully makes sense) (edit: something something watershed haha!) which probably works to deprive the land of an evolutionary source of natural wildfire defense/erosion prevention via strong root systems.

    I agree that the risk of transferring invasive species both flora and fauna is only growing with more international travel and trade. It's easy for globalist practices to disregard the evolution of plants, animals, predators, prey, etc in disparate ecosystems as something that can be infinitely fiddled with by humans for their convenience and whims (just look at all the non-native palm trees in the SF Bay Area as a minor local example); the convenience of modern aeronautics to move people around and of highway systems/mega-carriers to ship animals and plants and unwanted hitchhiking animals and plants is a massive threat to the evolutionary local stability of everything from bacteria to fungus to lichens to boring beetles to vectors like the aedes mosquito family who's brought us so many wonderful tropical and subtropical viruses and spread those viruses to other regions in those zones that they never would have reached without the relatively recent widespread travel of humanity and our goods. IIRC the recent spread of zika had something to do with the recycled tire bits trade (like used on newer-gen artificial turf sports fields and cushioning on playgrounds to replace wood mulch for example).

    It's mind-blowing to see us continue chugging along this path of dominance and mastery over nature even while understanding and suffering from the ramifications/faults more every year in every country. On the philosophical side it can be an interesting exercise in classifying the effects as 1) direct effects, 2) side effects, or 3) nature outright trying to force a correction (for example, 1) dam makes a reservoir which makes fish which makes birds of prey 2) dam restricts water downstream preventing the natural cycling of flooding/drying of flood plains which allows humanity to build on the banks which leads to dangerous situations when an overabundance of water upstream from the dam needs to be released en masse downstream into an engineered infrastructure not prepared for such an occurrence 3) dam is built and the arrogance of man thinking it's design and installation are infallible allows for man to adapt by moving into area beneath dam, and even after 12 years of knowing dam is potentially catastrophically fallible and not doing anything to rectify it OR announce it to the public allowing them to adapt and move away if they choose, dam damn near fails and covers 200,000 people with an average of 80 ft of water, teaching man a hard lesson.
     
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  6. ultramanhyata Silver Belt

    ultramanhyata
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    That. Or the rapture is imminent.

    OP thinks the data more strongly supports the latter.
     
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  7. west42 Purple Belt

    west42
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    fwiw fl is not underwater. We got like cat 2 winds at the worst and a bit more rainfall than a good thunderstorm would drop.
     
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  8. mcveteran81 Veteran

    mcveteran81
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    Some of these west coast fires are the largest ever recorded. Montana has been on fire for over 3 months.
     
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  9. mcveteran81 Veteran

    mcveteran81
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    I had forgotten about that until your post reminded me.

    It's absolutely mind boggling how many wide spread disasters are occurring all at once across the face of the earth.

    What blows my mind is that these disasters are like dominoes or akin to doubling down. One disaster tends to begotten to another one down the road.....just seems like the distance down the road is shrinking and it's becoming more frequent.

    What is very curious to me and one that no one talks about is Hurricane Jose which is doing a circular flight pattern out in the Atlantic right now. I can't think of any other storm at the moment that has had such an unpredictable pattern.....

    if I had to guess, i think Jose is going to head up and hit New York....if it does....oh boy.
     
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  10. JonnyRingo84 Gold Belt

    JonnyRingo84
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    [​IMG]
     
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  11. mcveteran81 Veteran

    mcveteran81
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    Indeed it is, just not for the reasons Al Gore is mentioning.

    As much as man's pride leads him to believe that he controls the weather (Clearly we can manipulate it & weaponize it to an extent), ultimately *nature* follows but one master, it's Creator Christ Jesus.
     
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  12. ShinkanPo Queen of Bad Jokes!

    ShinkanPo
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    Well I hope Trump build that wall already so that certain Jesus can stop fucking up the weather in your country!
     
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  13. fallable Brown Belt

    fallable
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    That's the runaway effect or the snowball effect.

    Supposedly one time in the ancient past the earth turned into an iceball. For some reason the earth began to cool. (Maybe something to do with algae and more oxygen less carbon dioxide, I can't remember). As it gets cooler more ice forms, more ice reflects more sunlight, which in turn makes it colder, which leads to more ice forming, which reflects more sunlight etc.

    This effect can manifest in any number of ways of course. Not just with ice.

    As I said in my above post. Drought weakens the trees, weakened trees are more susceptible to sudden oak death, trees afflicted with sudden oak death are more susceptible to beetle damage, and you end up with a lot of dead trees and subsequent wildfires as a result. Less trees means more erosion, less carbon storage, less oxygen which all effect the environment in various ways and have the potential to lead to their own runaway effects.
     
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  14. JonnyRingo84 Gold Belt

    JonnyRingo84
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    well if jesus is real, then he controls the chemistry in people's swimming pools to, unless you continually pee in it. then it changes, and i suppose jesus allows it. the same logic would apply to taking things out of the ground, and turning them into gasses for over a century. eventually, the atmosphere may change...
     
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  15. AndrewSUFC Brown Belt

    AndrewSUFC
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    So when does the world end? I know it's supposed to be this month, but do we at least get to see Canelo-GGG?
     
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  16. mcveteran81 Veteran

    mcveteran81
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    I can't give you a definitive answer. All I can do is try to interpret the information I perceive.
     
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  17. mcveteran81 Veteran

    mcveteran81
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    40,000 Lightning Strikes in the Los Angeles area happened between the September 10th and 11th.

    KTLA news (Local LA news network):
    http://ktla.com/2017/09/11/videos-c...ikes-around-socal-more-wild-weather-forecast/

    LA times links:
    http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-ln-lightning-california-los-angeles-20170911-story.html

    volatile storm brewing over Southern California produced nearly 40,000 lightning strikes and threatened to bring more rain and thunderstorms Monday, forecasters said.

    The lightning and in-cloud flashes were observed in the last 24 hours over Los Angeles, Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo and Ventura counties, with the most activity occurring Sunday evening, according to the National Weather Service. In one instance, forecasters recorded more than 5,000 lightning bolts in the area over a three-hour period.
     
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