Is there an orthodox Lomachenko? | Page 3

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by Higus, Apr 24, 2017.

  1. Sinister Doctor of Doom

    Sinister
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    I disagree with this. And IMO this completely undermines the idea of "training"...it's this kind of mentality that allows people to "sort of" replicate a tried and true form of fighting and be dismissive of it's essential fundamentals because "I'm just doing me, what works for me"...Andre Berto and Adrien Broner get beat up every time they drop their lead hand and try to replicate the Crab defense, because they were not taught it. Fighting is not sitting in chairs, sitting in chairs doesn't take a tremendous amount of work or a mind for your own safety. Floyd Mayweather Jr. was ABSOLUTELY taught a particular style of fighting since childhood, molded by his Father. Did he distill it to suit himself? Absolutely. But that doesn't negate the countless hours of teaching his Father put in, remove that and the rest is likely to crumble. Mike Tyson was ABSOLUTELY taught a honed style that Cus D'Amato taught to two other World Champions and he himself said it was FULLY refined by Tyson's time. D'Amato trained other fighters, and he did not teach them this. Archie Moore absolutely used his "Lock"...which he likely picked up from Hiawatha Grey (who was a bare-knuckle Champion). He taught plenty of fighters, his Gym in San Diego still exists, run by his Son Billy. But they did not teach everyone this style. George Foreman and Gilbert Baptist used it in Title fights. They did learn those styles, they were taught them as foundations of how to fight.

    I don't think style is merely defined as what you can do, but HOW you do what you can do. Ingle's guys were taught the same fundamentals, that they all had different athletic attributes and methods of applying those fundamentals that they favored personally should never undermine the existence of those principals. This mentality is also why very good fighters often make shitty trainers. Because when it's time to teach someone all they try to do is get them to copy what THEY could do, instead of teaching them everything they were ever taught themselves about fighting, which would enable the student to find their own identity instead of trying in futility to replicate their teacher's abilities.
     
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  2. NAKMUAY18 Purple Belt

    NAKMUAY18
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    You completely disagreed, then agreed with me.
     
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  3. AndyMaBobs Green Belt

    AndyMaBobs
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    Y'know your basement? Well right underneath that.

    Yeah I think you really should be taught a proper system if you're going to try to replicate it. If you want to be an opera singer, you need to go through years of training otherwise you'll wreck your voice trying to get to that style. A guy like Broner will mimick Mayweather on the outside, but doesn't have the inside game that makes Mayweather well rounded.
     
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  4. Sinister Doctor of Doom

    Sinister
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    He doesn't do well with it on the outside either.
     
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  5. Sinister Doctor of Doom

    Sinister
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    No, I didn't.
     
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  6. whooty Blue Belt

    whooty
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    What stands out to me about Lomachenko is just his solid, solid fundamentals. He has great punching technique, sets up his strikes very well and obviously moves and pivots very well. What makes him special is the creativity in taking angles, hand traps, and other setups. They're all relatively 'simple' techniques to learn, but to take them and apply them in a fight like that takes serious talent.

    As I think Sinister and Andy already told you, it's nearly impossible to copy everything he does, because what works well for him might not work as well for you. What you can do (if you're already a somewhat decent boxer) is analyse his fight, look at some of the things he does and try them for yourself.

    One of the things Lomachenko does, which I like a lot myself and use while sparring a southpaw trainingspartner (I'm orthodox), is using the jab a couple of times, and when he starts covering up a bit, trapping the back hand. He has two great setups from there, he'll then pull the hand from the shell and land the cross or backhand hook, or he'll blindside you with the glove, and pivot towards your blind side, to take a dominant angle and land a combination.

    You could even try it as an orthodox fighter by using your cross instead. Now I'm thinking of it, I'm going to try that tonight as well.

    But again, it all starts with fundamentals, being able to punch well, to know how to use your feet, pivots, head movement, etc. Almost everything he does is pretty 'textbook' and are things you can learn from any good boxing trainer. But to put everything together like Loma does, that'll take world class dedication and a shitload of talent as well.

    What's your experience in boxing, your body build, weight, height, etc? And, do you have video's of yourself sparring?
     
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