I keep losing

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by EatMyShorts, May 13, 2017.

  1. EatMyShorts Orange Belt

    EatMyShorts
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    It's like this.

    I have a mental health condition, which vastly deteriorates my energy levels.

    But I love combat sports.
    To make it as manageable as possible, I just box at an amateur level competitively, train everything else, but do not compete - cause 3x2 min rounds I can scamp away with.

    Now, I love the competition, I love training, the technical aspect to it, and understanding and developing technique all the time.

    But - my energy is so low, everyone just thinks I have a world class level of shit fitness.
    I gas out immediately, and basically apply myself in such a way as to survive the contests, whether that be moving away/dodging, closing distance and working from inside only, with lots of defense etc.

    It's demoralizing - I've lost all my contests in the past year, about 8 of them - and it's only in the last year I've been ABLE to compete, cause the previous 6 years, I was living like a junkie - as I did not seek treatment for my condition, so I couldn't compete at all.

    What am I hoping to achieve here?

    Fuck knows.

    it's just, losing, to guys I should be beating easy, not giving myself a pat on the back in one sense here but, given my level of technique in contrast to theirs.

    What's a brother gonna do?

    Trying to augment my treatment constantly, get the right fix of meds.

    What a fuck up...
     
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  2. kingkokong Green Belt

    kingkokong
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    You don't need to fight if your heart isn't in it. If your losing to people you should be beating, then you don't want it, as bad as your opponents imo

    Just train for fitness

    Edit. Just reread and wonder if maybe you should try meditation or see a sport shrink....hope it works out for ya
     
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  3. Hagelslag2 Brown Belt

    Hagelslag2
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    As someone who dealt with an anxiety disorder and depression and took a fight at that time, just don't do it. You'll just not be in the head space that is required to deal with the roller coaster that is a fight. Unless you can get your mental condition under control, I'd advise you not to take fights. IMO it's a accident waiting to happen.
     
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  4. Sano Brown Belt

    Sano
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    I don't know about completely ruling it out. I've had fights while dealing with severe anxiety. Yes, it made it a lot worse and I performed like shit, but still. It's about building up to something.

    TS, maybe you should take a break yeah. If it's even anxiety you're feeling? Anyway, perhaps take a break from competing, start doing some LISS training that'll get your heart rate down and have a positive impact on your parasympathetic nervous system. That way, you'll get your base fitness up and calm down a little too. Stop thinking about competing for a little bit, and if you do want to shadowbox in a few weeks again then just work on slowing things down and being relaxed while doing it. Don't rush.

    Have you felt lifting heavy has made anything better in regards to your boxing, or condition?
     
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  5. EatMyShorts Orange Belt

    EatMyShorts
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    Yup, lifting heavy the is core focus of my training, cause it's gets my body in shape which is great for my state of mind.

    One very important aspect of the condition and trying to live normally, is not showing that I have it.
    So when I'm in shape - people immediately assume I'm fit and healthy.

    The condition is primarily low mood/depression - but by far and away it's outstanding characteristic, is chronic fatigue.
    It's endogenous - which means, it would be better defined as a neurological imbalance or misfiring, that depression - cause that reference, people instantly assume that depression means background trauma or weakness of mind or some shit, which is not the case here.
    I was always fit, healthy, happy - and then it went pear shaped.

    Like I said, I spent years and years untreated, where I had to work bottom rung jobs - so, particularly in that type of environment, I had to learn not to show any condition symptoms i.e. don't show weakness. That might sound laughable, but it's true.


    In the current competitive circle, guys seem to have figured out that my gas tank sucks, cause recently, my opponents game plan is obviously high pressure, from start to finish.

    It's just - waking up this morning, after ANOTHER loss - it's grinding me down.
    I'm on disability at the moment, so training and competing is all I have, without sounding dramatic.

    The upside is, getting into the ring, getting out - even losing - there's a part of me that feels so good, great. Just competing.

    I've been through so many medications, each offering a slight improvement but - not to the level where I can function, really even at a fraction of the pace of a normal person.
     
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  6. kingkokong Green Belt

    kingkokong
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    Hormone imbalance? not getting enough sleep?

    I would get my T/E levels checked... shit can affect mentally and be physically draining
     
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  7. Sano Brown Belt

    Sano
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    What's your diagnosis? If you don't mind me asking.

    So it's not so much anxiety, more chronic fatigue, inability to relax and being exhausted all the time?

    If the lifting helps you, then keep doing what you are doing. A loss means nothing really, everyone loses. You just have to learn from it.

    What activities do you have that calms you down and makes you feel relaxed, if any? I'd still try to incorporate any kind of LISS you prefer. An activity that also mentally let's you recover and not think so much, while getting your general aerobic system up.
     
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  8. biscuitsbrah Black Belt

    biscuitsbrah
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    Id say do more research in trying to naturally cure your chronic fatigue. Definitely take some time off from competing
     
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  9. rmongler Brown Belt

    rmongler
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    Zinc.

    Lithium orotate.

    Cod liver oil.
     
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  10. Relentless chase The one and only

    Relentless chase
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    It seems to me you're not all mentally there to compete. this game is about 90% mental and 10% physical. it's all in the head. I'm telling you, you might think it's fun and all to just go out there to compete and it is believe me, but you're going in there to fight. you're putting yourself on the line when you step into that ring/cage. It's not worth even stepping in there if you aren't all zoned in to the task at hand /or the fight game. if you want fun, go compete at a BJJ tournament or something like that. MMA is a whole different ball park. I would recommend take time to just train and mix in some sparring with your training. not 100% all out sparring, just some technical touch sparring to not only get a feel of things, but to get technique, speed, timing, everything down pat. you need to be 100% prepared in all areas when you step in there. work your Muay Thai, work your BJJ, work cage takedown offense and defense, work overall wrestling offense and defense. be 100% well rounded as possible. your coach shouldn't even let you compete until he knows you're able to hold your own in the cage. my coach wouldn't let me compete until 1 1/2 years into training, but I was ready. you need to focus on just training and see where it all leads to in the future. just work hard, harder than you've ever worked before. at the end of the day, if you want it bad enough, you'll find a way to beat your opponent. I know I sounded a bit douchey there, but it's the truth.
     
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