I have a question about Boxing footwork.

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by Crimson Glory, Mar 16, 2017.

  1. Crimson Glory TMMAC

    Crimson Glory
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    So in this video the instructor clearly shows, when throwing the right hand after the jab, too have your back foot follow your front foot as you pivot.

    It's clear it's meant to maintain the stance, I just wanted to know if that's proper technique or if it's just one aspect of footwork.

    I'm pretty new to Boxing, only been formally training it for less than 2 months, maybe 1-2 times a week, I've watched many videos on punching technique, like how to pivot for power, how to dip slightly when throwing the uppercut etc, but I always thought that with the 1-2 combo, you were supposed to only step forward with your front foot and throw the right hand with a long stance.

    Thoughts?
     
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  2. Reyesnuthugr belt

    Reyesnuthugr
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    He's right. If you keep your right foot back there it's called "foot in a bucket" and it's a common mistake that everyone makes at first. Usually after you jab someone, they're out of your range and so you have to do that half step anyway to connect with your right. The only way you wouldn't is maybe if they're coming forward or if they're really close to you (but make sure your right foot is still under you). If you leave your back foot behind you instead of under you when you throw your right, the mechanics are off for the punch delivery itself and you're off balance + stretched out, and easy to knock over.
     
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  3. Crimson Glory TMMAC

    Crimson Glory
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    Foot in the bucket... interesting...

    I've been finding when I hit the heavy bag and I do this after he jab, that my right hand is "choked" if you will and I don't get full leverage. Although, it definitely works well for throwing body shots as my balance is much better.

    Thanks!
     
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  4. a guy Black Belt

    a guy
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    Sounds like a range problem, but definitely take that back foot with you. More balance, more power and you're in better position to follow up with the next shot.
     
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  5. ssullivan80 see....what had happened was

    ssullivan80
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    If that's the case your over-reaching or overextending your jab (falling to far onto the front foot/hip), your right foot should be underneath your rear shoulder when your jab lands and if your having to shift it forward, it's your right foot that you are leaving behind when you are stepping into the jab by falling to heavy onto the front foot. Your right cross is a longer reaching punch than is your jab, hence: jab into range, set, then throw your cross. You DONT want to get into the habit of your right foot sliding forward when you throw your cross.

    Then your simply "falling" into your cross. See above.
     
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  6. freaky Freakiest Poster Belt

    freaky
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    Isn't it obvious? After a jab, you've stepped forward. It's only natural to pivot and drag your rear foot as well. Or after the jab you step back and throw that right hand but chances are you will be out of range. There's also an exersize in which you throw 1-2s across the gym. From one end to the other.
     
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  7. a guy Black Belt

    a guy
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    This shadowboxing demonstrates how to step with the 2 very well:



    His mechanics in general are great.
     
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  8. ssullivan80 see....what had happened was

    ssullivan80
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    Maybe I am missing what is trying to be explained. However, if you jab moving forward by pressing off the rear foot then you shouldn't need to shift or move the rear foot at all in order to throw the cross..... In short, if you wan't to advance with the jab you press off the rear foot (into the jab) not step forward with the front foot. By stepping forward with the front foot , your leaving your rear foot behind.... hence, the need to slide it up in order to throw the cross vs. pressing off the rear foot into the jab (keeping weight over rear hip, foot under shoulder) your rear foot shouldn't need to move as it's already in place to throw the cross. I.E: step in with the jab, throw the cross.

    If your moving back (opponent advancing) and throwing the jab, then you can step back with the rear foot while jabbing (foot in bucket) and throw the cross. Either way, the rear foot set's to throw the cross and depending on which direction your going the step is with the jab (pressing off rear foot going forward, stepping back with rear foot moving back).
     
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    Last edited: Mar 22, 2017 at 4:55 PM
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  9. freaky Freakiest Poster Belt

    freaky
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    And then what happens after the cross? You pull back and bring the lead foot back to reset or you drag the rear foot forward.

    I guess you drag it after the cross not during the cross. You want to be grounded. Or I guess it depends on how much you leaped forward. Drag during the cross for longer reach as to not leaning forward too much, off balancing yourself/exposing yourself.
     
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  10. PivotPunch Red Belt

    PivotPunch
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    Yeah how the guy does it is exactly how I was taught. Obviously you need to bring the rear foot with you if you don#t you are out of your stance while throwing that's bad offensively and defensively.
    Why should you throw it with a "long" stance? You have your stance and the "long" stance just means you are out of your stance and have bad balance and maybe even bad leverage. Obviously textbook speaking how you should learn it and also everyone's stance is slightly different. If you have a really wide stance it makes it even mechanically impossible to get even longer and throw the 1-2 without bringing your rear foot with you.

    @ssullivan80 I don't understand you? You say one should keep the rear foot one step behind and throw it while being out of your stance?
     
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  11. Reyesnuthugr belt

    Reyesnuthugr
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    All true and very useful info in your post. The takeaway is, move your right foot forward when you need to and don't when you don't. You may even need to take a half or full step (maybe two) BACK before throwing your right to make it connect with your opponent. It all depends on where he is now AND what he does after (where he moves after your first punch).

    You'll still have to take a step forward with your left and right foot before throwing your right sometimes (often). Lots of opponents like to move or shrink backwards or sideways when they see you start any punch (even a jab) or feel it connect. If the jab lands, it can bounce them backwards a tiny bit plus they shrink as a reflex, and you might lose penetration with your right hand (because it can be longer than a jab but not THAT much longer to reach a retreating/pulling-back opponent without any footwork). This happens all the time.

    Also the jab can be incredibly long if you turn almost sideways and use it like you would in swordplay. This jab catches people off guard from long range (because of how incredibly long range it is) and if you hit someone with it, you're not going to be able to get good penetration with your right hand afterwards most times because they're already on the outermost boundary of your general reach (but they didn't realize they were still within hittable range, because a lot of people don't know how to throw their best jab).

    But yeah, I get what you're saying about a regular jab within or inside normal distance, there still will OFTEN be proximity to shoot your right after the jab and hit the guy after your jab lands (which is why the 1-2 is likely the most winning-est combo out there). You have to manage the distance depending on the relation of where you are to where he is after you jab- it's not set in stone for every opponent or even for the same opponent every exchange.

    If you don't need to step, I agree it's best not to step. The problem here is it is very useful to step with your right (and touch down) before throwing your right hand if you need to, and a lot of people don't know how to or if it's even ok to do in boxing. Yes it's ok, it's a very useful technical detail taught in boxing gyms, (one that most people would/do not figure out on their own) but like anything, you don't do it ALL the time, just when its beneficial to.
     
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    Last edited: Mar 22, 2017 at 9:33 PM
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  12. ssullivan80 see....what had happened was

    ssullivan80
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    If your rear foot is underneath your rear shoulder and your weight isn't too far forward over your front foot when you throw that cross, then what happens after the cross is whatever you choose and your ability to move in any direction, offensively or defensively and maintain the ability to continue the attack with either hand is possible. Anytime you commit to throwing any shot and you leave yourself without the ability to move in any direction or attack with either hand afterwards simply means you got out of position and off balance. Again if you keep your weight centered in your stance, don't let your head get to far out in front of your lead foot, to far behind your rear foot or to far outside of your left or right hip (leaning) then you'll not limit your ability to move or attack in any direction.

    I.E: Get into your boxing stance and imagine a rectangular box drawn across the back or your rear heel .... I , down the outside edges of your feet and about midway across your front foot..... If you keep your head inside those lines you should be able to throw, defend and evade any punch, moving any direction. The moment your head gets outside those lines, you limit your options.

    No, one should keep the rear foot underneath the rear shoulder with your weight slightly heavier on the rear hip before firing the cross. The only way the rear foot get's one step behind on the 1-2 is if your stepping forward with, or leaning/falling to far over the front foot to throw the jab vs pressing forward off the rear foot to throw the jab.

    (It's been a long time since I have posted on the forums, but I imagine Sinister's tile video is still out there somewhere. Find it and that should give you a better visual example of what I am explaining.)
     
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  13. ssullivan80 see....what had happened was

    ssullivan80
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    Keep your right foot under your rear shoulder and keep your weight inside your stance (see box explanation above/below), If you do that you can press forward or to your left with the rear foot (assuming orthodox), back or to the right with your lead foot. No single punch should compromise your ability to do this, if it does, your out of position.

    Regardless, of how narrow your shoulders get or how long you reach for your jab, your cross SHOULD be able to follow behind it well within range to generate power. The ONLY way (unless you've got a genetic condition making one arm significantly shorter than the other) your jab can reach farther than your cross is if your leaning, falling or reaching to far over your front foot to throw it. In short, anytime your jab lands your weight should be over your rear hip and heavier on your rear foot. In which case you can then again press off the rear foot coming forward into your cross.

    I am not saying you can't come forward with the cross behind the jab, but the way to do it is not by sliding up your foot behind the jab, it's by pressing off the rear foot into the jab, keeping your weight over the rear hip/foot when the jab lands so you can press off it again to come forward into the cross. Hence, when the TS posted about his cross being smothered on the HB on the 1-2 it's simply because he's landing his jab to far forward onto his rear foot then falling into his cross vs. turning into it (which requires your weight to be over the rear foot/hip).
     
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    Last edited: Mar 23, 2017 at 1:03 PM
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  14. Reyesnuthugr belt

    Reyesnuthugr
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    Keen insight there. I hadn't even considered that.

    There are a lot of people that try to lean on/over their front foot when they jab, I guess basically everyone who hasn't been told not to.
     
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