How does high competition in boxing stack up with ufc?

Discussion in 'UFC Discussion' started by Lissove, Jun 21, 2018.

  1. Lissove

    Lissove Guest

    Boxing has many competitors, orgs and belts, but champs aren't created equal. My question is, how much of high level guys there are in boxing in the same weight class compared to UFC, all belts aside?

    135 and 145 155 has many high level guys who can go at each other and have interest on who will come out on top, and everyone considered high level. In boxing, some champions challange other champions and look like amateur with poor technique. Although in ufc we have Shogun as a potential LHW contender in year 2018.
     
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  2. wilKO

    wilKO Green, White & Gold belt

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    Way more. There is a massive amateur scene were guys have 50 fights before turning pro.

    In MMA we have guys with 10-15 fights being top of the divisions all the time. That almost never happens in boxing.
     
  3. X Factor

    X Factor Blue Belt

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    Can't really compare they are two different sports. High level in mma is a much broader statement as there is high level wrestlers, boxers, kickboxers, jiu jitsu grapplers, all kinds of areas you can be high level at in mma.
     
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  4. Flboycanscrap2

    Flboycanscrap2 Green Belt

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    Boxing is far more competitive than MMA. It is a true global sport that is more than a century old with a incredibly well established amateur system working from the local level to the Olympics. Amateurs can start their careers super young and the most prolific amateur champions can have 500 fights.

    The gap between Boxing and MMA is immense, give MMA another 70 years and see where it is at.
     
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  5. Pain4Pain

    Pain4Pain Orange Belt

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    To be fair most boxers fight 10-20 nobodies/low level fighters in becoming pro in order to gather experience and make a name for themselves. You can see that most world ranked boxers started fighting high level opponents toward the end of their career, which is why going undefeated as a boxer with 20+ fights is so common until it gets to the championship level. Otherwise, I agree with you that they are more experienced, especially in regard to amateur competition.

    I agree, some guys are more talented at one aspect of the fight game than others. Some guys have poor TDD, poor KO power for their weight class etc.

    I don't see MMA achieving the international presence of boxing in our lifetime though.
     
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  6. TheChance

    TheChance Black Belt

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    They can have 500 fights and 490 of them will be fixed, That is not as commonplace in MMA.
     
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  7. bjjwar

    bjjwar Brown Belt

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    Haven't u seen Conor vs Floyd?The so called best boxer ever in mma got humiliated like a little girl against a retired, untrained, 41 yr old dude that was trying his hardest not to finish him too quick...
     
  8. Flboycanscrap2

    Flboycanscrap2 Green Belt

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    What are you even talking about. You think amateur boxing matches are fixed? Amateur boxing is consistently competed in tournament format against the best in the world, where you can't duck anyone.

    No amateur boxer has a pristine record besides Vasyl Lomachenko.
     
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  9. The Bear

    The Bear Blue Belt

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    Re-visit this board in 100 years. Or not.

    "boxing is dying" were the shouts of some MMA coke heads, only a few years back and now look, the same shout comes to MMA.

    All sports "combat particularly" have peaks and troughs to some extent but MMA is a BABY sport.

    I don't have the links to hand (would need serious digging) but I came across some newspaper articles from the 1920's. Very derogotary and demeaning. Incredibly patronising. Not dissimilar to how MMA was seen 15 or more years ago (even more recent perhaps).

    No. There is no comparison and it's not close on any scale. MMA to Boxing is like Earth to Jupiter.
    When you have 100 million kids around the world practicing from pre-teen until maturity, every level from amateur to regional circuit has higher quality, better skilled, disciplined, conditioned and more. And boxing skills have reached an almost scientific peak of excellence, way beyond its formative years. With innovators like Ali setting a HW standard, to genius fighters like Mayweather and Lomachenko. You need 100 years of foundation and shared knowledge for MMA fighters to become anything like that. Silva. Jones. GSP. These guys are the early pioneers of excellence and genial approach but they will become the norm in another 50 years from now. You might not believe that because of how good they are, but indeed they are just stepping stones for other people to learn from in the future.
     
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  10. The Bear

    The Bear Blue Belt

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    Lomachenko finished his amateur career with an impressive career record of 396 wins and only one loss
     
  11. XThe GreatestX

    XThe GreatestX Red Belt

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    Amateur? ....nah
     
  12. XThe GreatestX

    XThe GreatestX Red Belt

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    Boxing has 100 years on mma
    100 yrs of legends
    100 yrs of fighters
    100 yrs of history.....

    It will likely always be bigger
     
  13. Rampage_Jackson

    Rampage_Jackson Black Belt

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    Sure you can. Boxing has an infinitely deeper talent pool and MMA is a very very very shallow field of fighters. You can compare it pretty easily.

    Boxing has tons of depth in competition across the world. MMA does not.
     
  14. Flboycanscrap2

    Flboycanscrap2 Green Belt

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    I know, i noted him as the only guy with a pristine amateur career.
     
  15. The Bear

    The Bear Blue Belt

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    haha. I came here to mock your quote. "pristine" being immaculate, but I was pointing out his loss. Close, but no cigar.
     
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  16. Flboycanscrap2

    Flboycanscrap2 Green Belt

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    Yeah, i got you. It is as close as anyone in gonna get with that many fights, especially since he avenged his loss multiple times.
     
  17. Sakuraba7

    Sakuraba7 Black Belt

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    I watch both sports, and although I do have issues with boxing I still accept that there's a relative opportunity for all competitors from all corners of the word to have a shot at a world title. It's not completely equal/fair, as boxers from the US/UK/Mexico have an advantage in terms of titleshots and repeated titleshots which the foreigners usually don't. But the mere fact that there's four titles which are seen in equal light gives people multiple routes, and you're not stuck with a situation with one champ colluding or hogging "the" belt.

    But in MMA, it's completely skewed. In MMA, the UFC is seen as king, while Bellator is seen as the second guy. In the UFC, everything is geared towards Americans and Brazilians. There's roughly 66 male Brazilian fighters signed to the UFC, compared to only 23 Russian fighters. And most of those Russians fight once a year. Brazil is great at BJJ, but Russia is great at wrestling, Sambo, judo, Sanda and boxing. They have hundreds of Olympic medals in wrestling and boxing. Brazil has 0 medals in wrestling, and only 3 in boxing (their first Gold won in 2016). So why are there so few Russians, but 3x as many Brazilians?

    Then there's Bellator, which has an outright blacklist on North Caucasian fighters. The Russian Olympic wrestling team is entirely North Caucasian. They dominate Combat Sambo and MMA in Russia as well. Bellator having Russians but barring North-Caucasians is like someone allowing American boxers but barring Blacks/Hispanics. How do you bar the dominant contingent?

    Boxing is changing its ways, there's more Eastern European and Central-Asian fighters being signed by Western promoters. GGG and Shumenov opened a lot of doors, and promoters are signing Kazakh and Uzbek Olympians and amateur aces. It's only in the last 2 years that Uzbeks have started going pro. Even though they dominated the amateurs for decades. I would appreciate if the UFC would sign more CIS fighters, particularly Russians who dominate grappling and who currently have one of the largest MMA scenes in the world with 4 major orgs and a dozen smaller orgs.

    They are grossly underrepresented in the UFC. In fact, from what I gather the UFC doesn't even sign them. It's usually Ali AbdelAziz who signs them, then brings them to the UFC or PFL, whichever of the two takes them. One man can't handle it all, it also means Ali only signs athletes from gyms he's personally acquainted with. There's an ethnic dimension to this as well, which ends up where most of the guys he signs are from Northern Dagestan. Fighters from Southern Dagestan, Circassia and Chechnya have an even less chance of getting in. I mean, a few years ago most of the guys signed were teammates/friends of Khabib alone.
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2018
  18. Phisher

    Phisher Silver Belt

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    To be fair, the development process for prospects in boxing is completely different.

    Top level fighters typically have dozens of fights against guys who had no chance of beating them.

    In recent years, you've had decorated amateurs like Lomachenko and Rigondeaux beat top ranked competition and win championships in fewer than ten fights.
     
  19. Sakuraba7

    Sakuraba7 Black Belt

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    Russian MMA Union and WMMAA have a pretty extensive amateur system they've developed over the last few years. There's regional tournaments held in all of the Russian federal districts, then national, then European and World titles. Ankalaev is a multiple-time champ. Zabit competed in it as well. Several other countries who are members of WMMAA also send fighters to their World and European championships. The biggest problem to me is they don't publish the records consistently, and the MMA record sites don't update them properly either.
     
  20. The Bear

    The Bear Blue Belt

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    This is an excellent and straight up article.

    It's just that and as it probably always will be; the American money machine skews the whole thing.
    There is an unreal amount of tough, excellent fighters with boxing and wrestling/judo backgrounds in Russia, especially the Caucas region but they will never get any recognition. Especially with a broad absurd cuck level of journalism that mounts the front page about Chechnya and politics/war crimes. These guys will probably never get handed a decent shot at it over in the "West".
     
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