How do you defend against flurry of punches?

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by ringosher, Dec 4, 2012.

  1. ringosher White Belt

    ringosher
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    Say your opponent charges at you and keeps punching non stop jab cross jab cross. Say he has a slightly longer reach.

    How do you defend?

    1.Move sideways/45 degress back (out of line of punches) and counter.
    2.Guard, move in/side, and unload on him.

    What else?
     
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  2. atecubanos Orange Belt

    atecubanos
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    Having good counters, as a power jab;
    clinching;
    front knee or kick;
    moving to the sides.
     
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  3. sk00pie White Belt

    sk00pie
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    There are several ways to defend againts a flurry from an agressive fighter. Foot work, timing, and countering I'd say being most important.

    A friend I frequently spar against is bigger and more agressive then me, always throwing flurries of 1-2 punches. What I found works the best is catching a punch then instantly throwing a punch with the same hand you used to parry with. Example, he throws a left hand, parry with your right then instantly throw your right hand after you parry. Of course this wont have much power but your chances of connecting are high and also a good chance it will interupt and stop his flurry.
     
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  4. TheBruteFist Orange Belt

    TheBruteFist
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    i would dip to one side come up with a bodyshot followed by a hook. Or guard up and dig my way straight inside and come up with an upper to the jaw since the straights are really useless from inside
     
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  5. Edison Carasio Red Belt

    Edison Carasio
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    Double leg FTW
     
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  6. ColonelAngus1 Black Belt

    ColonelAngus1
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    /thread
     
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  7. Azam Purple Belt

    Azam
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    From a stand-up perspective you could either;

    1. Step in & clinch or knee then clinch.

    2. Create adequate space & sweep him - which is usually what I opt for - ashi barai works well in situations like this - usually when someone is charging at you, their legs imo are the weak spot - even a well timed inside leg kick would be enough to put them off-balance.

    3. Use lateral/circular movement like alot of guys have mentioned - stops guys who want to close the distance & counter.

    4. Lead him into a well timed counter - which would also be something I'd opt for - since he's already got some momentum, defensively if you get it right, it would be hard for your opponent to avoid your strike because of the momentum he's generated - usually anything that comes under the guard is usually well-advised - me personally would probably be a mae geri (front kick), a parry followed by a straight - something Machida is quite fond of or a do-mawashi kaiten geri (wheel kick) a la Kyokushin style.

    5. If your a dirty fighter kick him in the groin & say it was an accident....
     
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  8. cOugAr_LIbRe_85 Brown Belt

    cOugAr_LIbRe_85
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    damn when did you go to a Kongo seminar?
     
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  9. ringosher White Belt

    ringosher
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    I spar boxing with a guy who is like that as well. He has a longer reach, and just keeps jabbing and crossing the entire session,i.e. 40 jabs/cross until you are out of the mat.

    The parry and hit back is about the only thing that works well for me. I parry his jab with my right hand, and immediately close the distance for a strong hook (gets him every time) and now it is my turn unload a flurry on him non stop.

    I can move left or right but he is a good boxer and he changes direction and follows me instantly so basically there is no window of opportunity to counter from 'outside the traffic'.
     
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  10. J Mill Brown Belt

    J Mill
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    winning
     
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  11. DrBdan Something clever

    DrBdan
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    Assuming both fighters are orthodox, step to your left while parrying their cross with your left hand. This opens up their right side for whatever: knee, body kick, hook etc.

    I also like sk00pies example of parrying and then firing back with the same hand. I've heard it called "skipping the stone" since your hand almost skips off their hand and into their face.
     
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  12. ringosher White Belt

    ringosher
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    We are boxing sparring so no legs/TDs allowed. He is a good boxer and changes direction with me instantly. I move left, he moves left and continues jabbing. He makes sure the jabbing hand never leaves my face basically.

    Another thing that works for me is infighting or basically going low and in and wham bam.
     
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  13. DrBdan Something clever

    DrBdan
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    In that case kicks will really work :)

    If he is constantly throwing straight punches that should make him predictable. What about slipping and throwing a straight to the body? e.g. when he throws a cross slip to your left with a small step and then throw a hard cross to the body.
     
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  14. ringosher White Belt

    ringosher
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    I do Muay Thai mostly and consider myself a decent Nak Muay having trained and fought in Thailand.

    But I have a lot of learn for boxing. I normally stay out of the 'traffic lane' by positioning myself just outside his lead hand so it is not easy to slip to my left while avoiding his cross as I most likely will eat a cross since I am so far to the right.

    My slipping, ducking and weaving is not that good as well I need to practise it more.
     
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  15. ssullivan80 Black Dress Belt

    ssullivan80
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    slip/cover and Pivot, punch (now your in the offensive position), rinse and repeat!

    If a guys coming forward with a barrage of straight punches, deductive logic says both he and you are moving in a straight line. Adding a pivot, takes away that straight line........... hence, problem solved.
     
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  16. jensen34 Orange Belt

    jensen34
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    Clinch them up or just start throwing hard shots back, uppercuts & hooks.
     
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  17. ssullivan80 Black Dress Belt

    ssullivan80
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    Throw UC's and Hooks eh? Moving in a straight line against a longer reaching fighter throwing straight shots....... I don't see that being a wise decision.......... :rolleyes:
     
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  18. sk00pie White Belt

    sk00pie
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    Heres a good video on how to box a pressure fighter, basically saying to utalize angles, distance, and positioning. If your opponent is always able to predict which way your going to move, throwing some feints could help him show you some respect and throw his game off. Try acting like your loading up to throw a power show to get him to cover up for a second then angle off at that point.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v2XyZlk21jk
     
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  19. IFightUFC100 Banned

    IFightUFC100
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    put your hands up???
     
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  20. KarateStylist Purple Belt

    KarateStylist
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    You have some interesting alternatives. They are especially important to me because so much of the karate kumite exercises omit or don't address this scenario, despite the boxer being well-apprised of it's likelihood....

    No. 1. My GG-trained boxer opponent was moving very defty with footwork.... This assumes he's going to remain still... No so in my case....

    No. 2. Tang Soo Do free sparring prohibits grappling or strikes below the waist.... Self defense, I say great ideas....

    No. 3. My opponent was not really pressuring me. The approach was really what seemed to me excellent footwork mobility of moving in & out of striking range, landing body shot flurries then retreating selecting when & how to move in again very agile-like.... Never saw any flat-footed, hesitation (until later).

    ^^^ I given the quick movements in, you didn't have much time to react.

    ^^^ In my case, however, my traditional karate philosophy also came into play....
    I don't generally retreat and don't like to do so.... However in this case, with the continued success of the GG-trained boxer, after several successful sorties on their part, I did then retreat....

    ^^^ The later, however, only buys temporary time.... since you have lost the fight to that point, and re-engagement absent corrective action--just brings more of the same.... :icon_sad:

    No. 4. HA! HA!... Now it's my turn to Scoff.... Someone who is this good and highly agile in their mobility.... they're going to pummel you for sure until you get that shot off.... I don't see how you can "Lead" someone this good into anything.... I know when I getting hit multiple times by a moving target in a seconds time frame they've already won the exchange.... :D

    ^^^ This is always given (by MMA'rs) as a reason why boxing is necessary to become a top striker.... karate's formal techniques are too choreographed to work against a case like the "flurries."

    No. 5. Apparently, striking forum members will warm to this approach... Not something that addresses my failing to win a karate sparring match....
    ^^^ I ultimately won this match, but it took some soul searching....

    KarateStylist
     
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