Getting hit by outside lower muay thai roundhouse kicks

Discussion in 'Standup Technique' started by DragoN, Feb 23, 2017.

  1. DragoN Yellow Belt

    DragoN
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    I was somewhat sparring the other day and I have no problem clashing shins with people. however, I fought against someone from the same southpaw lead as I was, and he was landing his muay thai roundhouse kicks to the back of my thigh and the back of my calves. I have strong bones so I can handle all the hits from the inside, but not the outside where my muscles are. What muscles need to be built, conditioned, or trained in order to withstand outside leg kicks?

    I'm thinking maybe squats? Squats works out the quads. Maybe leg press?
     
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  2. moonwolf Brown Belt

    moonwolf
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    1.if you are 'somewhat sparring' and clashing shin-to-shin you are an idiot. that's why there are shin guards.

    2.learn how to check a legkick.
     
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  3. ErikS White Belt

    ErikS
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    3, quads/front thigh, but, you shouldnt squat to get bigger thighs to be able to take legkicks better. Squatting for stronger thighs comes after you're jogging/bicycling at maxium amount of times/week already etc.

    4, Haven't seen your stance, ofcourse, but generally i'd say most fighters(western as thai) point their legs forward too much. Point them outwards a bit and the weakest point of the outside(right above the knee) will be protected much more while the kicks landing on the middle of your thigh will hit the centre of the biggest muscle instead of the outside of it where it's weaker.
     
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  4. DragoN Yellow Belt

    DragoN
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    I don't necessarily clash shins at full swing of a blast, I only lightly tap it from light to medium contact. I use it as a ways and means to condition my shins as well. So it's safe.

    Also your #2 isn't really helping either, because the context of which I'm asking is when you're already in a position where it's hard to avoid or check the kick. Basically, I might be in a situation where it's too late to do anything and I'm in a defensive situation to just eat an outside leg kick.


    Well, I run pretty well and I squat pretty well already; but thanks I was just looking for other ways to help supplement that. Actually, I did notice that when I ate those leg kicks it was sorta aimed at my calves and the back of my thighs, and I noticed when I got hit there I wasn't flexing those muscles at all, so it was like I was letting him hit my muscles in a vulnerable, non-flexed state. Perhaps contracting the thigh/calves muscles right before getting hit will help absorb the damage?
     
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  5. moonwolf Brown Belt

    moonwolf
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    if you are checking the kick then your muscle should be flexed.
    there are other/better ways to condition your shins.
    shinguards.
    tapping shins does not sound like an effective way to condition shins as there is no momentum/force in the kick. it seems like you don't know what you are doing at all. get a coach.
    and again, shinguards.
     
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  6. ErikS White Belt

    ErikS
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    Alright cool, well bigger muscles are always better to take hits ofcourse :)

    I get what you mean with getting hit "un-flexed".. modern and western MT fighters usually push their hip forward/tuck their ass, so that they can easily flex and make the thigh muscle short and hard.. someone with this position is very difficult to damage from mid-leg to the hip(this part is more vulnerable the more your leg is bent aka the thigh-muscle is made long), and with a straight leg-stance(if the leg being kicked is straight)the lower part of your leg is also more out of reach than if its your front-leg that's bent, so, even if they connect low it's often just with the foot thus not so dangerous for the knee.

    btw
    Best shin-conditioning, hands down to anything else -- > Sandbag. 20-50kg, depending on your legs and style. A sandbag lets you work the entire leg in a workout, while "shin to shin" will bruise the shit out of a few places and leave the rest un-conditioned(and it's likely you wn't do "shin-conditioning" until the hard bruises are "healed"). Other hard bags work too, ofcourse, but a small sandbag is by far best IMO as you can adjust it so easily to your current preference.
     
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  7. j123 Pro Sherdogger 500-0-1

    j123
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    So @DragoN , what I'm getting from the OP is that you're a southpaw? And most of the time you end up getting hit on the inside thigh, but against another SP your outside quad is getting hit?

    I think it just takes time, I've been in it for awhile so getting hit on the outside I'm used to, but when I got smashed on my back leg it hurt as I wasn't used to it.

    Getting stronger will help, but not really for this purpose. It just takes time.

    In terms of exercises, squats, front squats, and leg press are good. Use squats as the primary movement, if you do want to include the leg press, use it as accessory work.
     
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  8. AndyMaBobs Purple Belt

    AndyMaBobs
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    ^ all of this, plus... learn to teep well.

    A good teep will stop anything with the right timing. I've gotten decent at pushing people over with teeps when they hunt for low kicks. Your opponent can't hurt you if you push them away, sometimes prevention is the best cure ;)
     
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  9. j123 Pro Sherdogger 500-0-1

    j123
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    Those are annoying. I'm trying to use teeps more, we actually haven't done much "teeping" when I started out, and its a pretty good tool to have in the shed.
     
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  10. AndyMaBobs Purple Belt

    AndyMaBobs
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    Absolutely, that's why they're the best. :cool:

    It's a staple of traditional muay thai and its a shame it doesn't get used more, I think that westerners may have this idea like it doesn't hurt, so they try to go for the big power strikes, but if someones good at teeps it wears you down a lot. Especially over 5 rounds.
     
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  11. j123 Pro Sherdogger 500-0-1

    j123
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    Its also that alot of gyms in the west are MMA gyms, so with so much material to cover, they can't really dedicate too much time to teeps or traditional MT stuff.

    But yeah, the consensus is the same "you get hit with a swing kick, your arms or ribs will break. A teep just sucks"

    I'm the opposite, for a long time I've shutdown against good teepers, I'm decent at dealing with swing kicks but thrusting kicks threw me off. My coach would always think how weird it was how I'd cut off the ring, place my partner/opponent in the corner, but be gun shy to eating teeps.
    I'm better with it these days though, I have the rhythm to bait it most of the time now. Of course a good teeper from Thailand would wreck me on it, but against people of my exp. clas and lower, its fine.

    I've been using a karate style teep recently, its a snap type, and although its a bit different in terms of purpose, its a good technique.
     
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    Last edited: Feb 24, 2017
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  12. ARIZE Orange Belt

    ARIZE
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    I love the teeps. Even if in most fights, my opponent has reach advantage (both in arms and legs), the teeps help me to control the distance and the pace. And you can use them as a defensive tool (front), for more heavy damage (rear), or keep pressure from a distance by spamming them. Funny thing is, I didn't really used them when i started MT, but when i saw how people use the side kick in TKD, i started to apply them and now my whole game is based around them.
    Mixing mid and high, feints, etc can make your opponent have a real hard time to deal with them. And they can do damage. Face or solar plexus may give a knock down. A lot of them on the body can cumulate damage and fatigue, and every now and then you can make them loose balance and fall, which is always a plus...
     
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  13. cshireman4 Blue Belt

    cshireman4
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    As already mentioned, it will just take some getting used to. All fighters, whether orthodox or southpaw, rarely face southpaws. I don't think strong bones or lack of muscle are strong influencers, you just aren't accustomed to getting kicked there. If you know the guy/train with him regularly, ask if he'd mind throwing some at you before or after your sparring. You can build up resistance much quicker by repetitive drilling rather than relying on random chance during sparring.
     
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  14. rmongler Brown Belt

    rmongler
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    A good teep forgives many sins.
     
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  15. UWanaPlayDaGame Purple Belt

    UWanaPlayDaGame
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    @DragoN squats won't help you with this.

    you have to eat a lot of low kicks to the thigh and eventually you'll get used to it. it's not that your muscle is conditioned to take the low kicks - this won't happen - it's just that you'll get used to it.
     
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