Do rash guards help with the prevention of staph ? | Page 2

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by Kalma, Feb 27, 2011.

  1. Golden Child White Belt

    Golden Child
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    They don't mop? Really? If I suspected that the mopping was questionable I'd either mop myself or change schools. That's fucking nasty.
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  2. ShindoNinja faixa roxa

    ShindoNinja
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    The same guys that don't wash their gis!
     
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  3. xMikeyX Purple Belt

    xMikeyX
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    look into hibaclens and staph a septic. Clorhexidine and what not.

    Chlorhexidine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    This takes the staph off of your body. When you come into contact with others who might have staph on their bodies that are Methlyin Resistant- this is what kills it before it gets into your cuts and can then cause an infection. It's not like ringworm.
     
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  4. kying418 Blue Belt

    kying418
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    As others have alluded to, unless you don't sweat (and you partner doesnt either) during training, I think it's silly for people to think a rash guard will help prevent staph.

    The best thing to prevent staph is to skip training when you have any open cuts or sores on your skin.

    Secondly, to shower pretty soon after you train.
     
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  5. Golden Child White Belt

    Golden Child
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    How is it silly?

    I don't think anyone is saying a rash guard is an impenetrable barrier that staph can not break through. Or that a rash guard kills staph on contact.

    But it does help keep your skin from getting broken (mat burn, etc), which is the open door staph is looking for,and THAT helps stop staph. It's not the be all, end all of staph defense but it is certainly a good first line.
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  6. trn450 Orange Belt

    trn450
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    It's not silly at all. You outlined the most important part splendidly.
     
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  7. Bebop Brown Belt

    Bebop
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    you'll get less abrasions, which can reduce your susceptibility to bacterial infections. however, rash guards are porous, so they're about as effective as toilet seat covers as far as bacteria goes.
     
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  8. kying418 Blue Belt

    kying418
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    You have a good point- I was thinking about people thinking a rashguard would protect them if they already have an open wound/sore.

    I never actually thought about a rashguard preventing mat burn, etc- if it does that, then I stand corrected...it would help in preventing staph.
     
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  9. trn450 Orange Belt

    trn450
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    You're currently covered in potential infections staph and strep. What makes it an issue is when your skin is broken--this is where the biggest benefit of the rash guard comes in. And, to your previous point, some protection is still better than none. The HIV virus is considerably smaller than a condom pore, and I'm hoping you don't doubt it's effectiveness now that I've shared that little fact with you :p
     
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  10. Dubious Dom Orange Belt

    Dubious Dom
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    supposedly.

    less contact with other people's flesh, so i see how it could theoretically help
     
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  11. Syra White Belt

    Syra
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    I don't think that it stops the bacteria directly, but it helps protect the skin from scratches and cuts, which is a perfect environment for bacteria to grow. Far too often people forget to keep their nails short, and if they got shit on them, they basically but the stuff into your skin. That's how I got impetigo, from nails cutting up small wounds in the back of my neck. If the scratching would have taken place anywhere else, the infection could probably have been avoided.
     
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