coming back from a long break

Discussion in 'Grappling Technique' started by jcandoitbig, Sep 12, 2017.

  1. jcandoitbig Green Belt

    jcandoitbig
    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2013
    Messages:
    1,106
    Likes Received:
    258
    Location:
    SD, CA
    any advice from folks here that have come back to training after taking a significant break (8 months or longer)? I just started training again and I'm curious to hear thoughts on what you did to get back to where you were skill wise and timing wise as quickly as possible.
     
    #1
  2. vodkaBearSnow White Belt

    vodkaBearSnow
    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2012
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    12
    Location:
    Moscow
    My break was about 8 months. I never got back to where I was after injury and probably never will- some stuff I've used to do is now off-limits due to permanent damage.

    But the thing is, purely from competitive standpoint I'm now better grappler than before. I've revised my A-game (since several things I couldn't do anymore) and added a couple of new techniques to compensate, I've been lifting for most of the time I've been in a break (although only upper body), and even though I wasn't a weakling I'm now noticeably stronger. I'm much more focused on the things that work for me (because I simply cannot do what doesn't work as it leads to danger zone for my injury), and MUCH more aggressive at all entries and getting the game to where I want it to be (again, because I simply cannot allow it get to dangerous positions).
    My game now looks very different- I've reinvented (or at least tweaked) most of it.

    So yeah, technically I'm much more limited now, but more focused, aggressive and strong, and overall it kinda works.

    Technique-wise I was fine from the get-go, but my cardio kinda sucked for about a month, my timing was shit for 3 months, and only after about half a year I could definitely say that I've started improving from where I left off.


    Lifting 3-4 times a week, cycling in the gym and good diet probably helped a lot. I think diet is quite underrated for guys who get injured- when we train 5-7 times a week we get used to eating lots of shady stuff- ice cream, cakes etc, because grappling burns a lot of calories. But I see injured athletes balloon by 10-20-30 kilos in a very short amount of time simply cause they continue to eat the same as when they were training.
    Cutting those kilos back is hard, plus it makes getting back technique and timing even harderm, plus it affects cardio tremendously.
     
    #2
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2017
  3. Was at Pride GP 2000 Brown Belt

    Was at Pride GP 2000
    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2015
    Messages:
    1,927
    Likes Received:
    1,711
    How long did you train before you got injured? What kind of injury. I have had many breaks over the 20 years. If there is any physical activity you can do while out do it. The other thing is don't wait til things are perfect before coming back. I did that once and stayed out 1 year longer than I should have. And finally make sure you set the proper expectations with your self. You will get tapped by people you are tapping today. But if you think abut your strategy when you are out and come back and are consistent you will catch back up.
     
    #3
  4. Kenny from MD Less angry than before.

    Kenny from MD
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2007
    Messages:
    2,710
    Likes Received:
    436
    Location:
    Maryland
    Don't let discouragement and excuses make you a coward. Show up as much as humanly possible to minimize the amount of time it takes to get reacclimated. If you try to just dip your toes in the water, it will take forever for you to feel like yourself. Doesn't matter how out of shape you are, how little you can move, or if you are sore. Show up, and push yourself to participate.
     
    #4
  5. vodkaBearSnow White Belt

    vodkaBearSnow
    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2012
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    12
    Location:
    Moscow
    That here is the best way to get overtraining and/or repeated injury. After getting back on the mat people sometimes start to train as frequently as they were used to before the injury, and inevitably fail, as it takes time for the body to get ready. Starting from modest 3 times a week (+ some S&C), at least at first, looks like a safer way for return.
     
    #5
    EGDM likes this.
  6. EGDM Blue Belt

    EGDM
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2009
    Messages:
    576
    Likes Received:
    291
    I've learned this the hard way. Don't underestimate the wear and tear that training puts on your connective tissue and joints if you haven't rebuilt your muscle base and flexibility. This goes double if your initial layoff was for a knee injury.

    As I get older I have to give myself 3-6 months of training less than my brain would like so that the rest of my body can re-acclimate. "Don't train two days in a row" is a fair rule of thumb for anyone over 30 coming back from a big layoff.
     
    #6
  7. Kenny from MD Less angry than before.

    Kenny from MD
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2007
    Messages:
    2,710
    Likes Received:
    436
    Location:
    Maryland
    If an hour of jiu jitsu five days a week is "overtraining" you have some serious problems. Don't train like a moron and you won't get hurt. Stop being a ninny.
     
    #7
    Pied Piper likes this.
  8. EGDM Blue Belt

    EGDM
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2009
    Messages:
    576
    Likes Received:
    291
    For people without preexisting structural problems, sure. Many of us having chronic injuries to joints, though (hence the layoffs), and that kind of inflammation doesn't go away in 24 hours.
     
    #8
  9. Kenny from MD Less angry than before.

    Kenny from MD
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2007
    Messages:
    2,710
    Likes Received:
    436
    Location:
    Maryland
    If you need 6 months of never training two days in a row to "acclimate" you need to either seriously reevaluate the way you train, or you have an injury that needs further rest and rehab and you aren't ready to train.
     
    #9
    Pied Piper likes this.
  10. EGDM Blue Belt

    EGDM
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2009
    Messages:
    576
    Likes Received:
    291
    There is no rest or rehab for some orthopedic injuries. For example, I have an arthritic hip. Nothing I can do will regrow the missing cartilage. Jiu jitsu is actually good for the joint, since the activity is vigorous, full range of motion, but not especially high-impact. However, it's prone to inflammation and can get sore if don't carefully manage my rest as I ramp up my training. (Not training is worse.) My experience is similar with my knees. I'm missing a fair chunk of my meniscus on both sides and my LCL and MCL get strained easily. My sister had a shoulder surgery 10 years ago and has bone spurs, which get inflamed after several days of consecutive use.

    If you're young and have no significant problems, great! Train smart and hope you don't develop any. Those of us with some miles on our body can't be quite as cavalier. Not giving myself enough rest is how I got here in the first place.

    "If you can't train five days in a row indefinitely, you shouldn't be training at all" is a pretty limiting outlook.
     
    #10
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2017
    Was at Pride GP 2000 and CFGroup like this.
  11. 2008 Blue Belt

    2008
    Joined:
    May 23, 2008
    Messages:
    823
    Likes Received:
    142
    8 months is not a long lay off. 2-3 years is a long lay off.

    Don't get me wrong unless you were very good you'll be rusty for sure.
     
    #11
    Pied Piper likes this.
  12. Kenny from MD Less angry than before.

    Kenny from MD
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2007
    Messages:
    2,710
    Likes Received:
    436
    Location:
    Maryland
    Considering no one said that, it shouldn't be quotes.
     
    #12
  13. headkicktoleg Gold Belt

    headkicktoleg
    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2014
    Messages:
    15,043
    Likes Received:
    26,168
    Location:
    Raleigh, NC
    Learn to get better at positions that don't affect your injury. It will probably make you better overall anyway
     
    #13
    Pied Piper likes this.
  14. EGDM Blue Belt

    EGDM
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2009
    Messages:
    576
    Likes Received:
    291
    That's only a very minor paraphrase of your comments.

    Perhaps we're just agreeing that some practitioners have "serious problems". My point was that "show up as much as humanly possible" is not necessarily good advice for that portion of the population.
     
    #14
  15. Kenny from MD Less angry than before.

    Kenny from MD
    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2007
    Messages:
    2,710
    Likes Received:
    436
    Location:
    Maryland
    Uhh I would think it's obvious that showing up as much as humanly possible would be poor advice for someone with an arthritic hip that blows up after a consecutive day of training but this thread is about reacclimating to training after a short break sooooo moving on
     
    #15
  16. CFGroup Green Belt

    CFGroup
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2013
    Messages:
    976
    Likes Received:
    413
    Jez man good luck with that hip!

    7 week post op from hip resurfacing. It got to the point all I could do is bike ride. Zero impact or full range of motion training.

    I'm aiming to be back on the mat in May.

    Fucking bored out of my skull, but it's prompting me to do 3 hrs of PT a day while I'm out of work.

    When you get ready for surgery research the hip resurfacing rather than the hip replacement cause the resurfacing let's you go back to full impact training.

    It took me a couple of doctors to find Dr Scott Ball here at SDSU who did my surgery. It's really cool cause he's training surgeons from around the country so it will be more available.

    Good luck man!
     
    #16
    Was at Pride GP 2000 and EGDM like this.
  17. CFGroup Green Belt

    CFGroup
    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2013
    Messages:
    976
    Likes Received:
    413
    Look at the title dude!

    It says "long break"

    Move along son u r in the wrong thread!

    LOL!
     
    #17
    Was at Pride GP 2000 likes this.
  18. jcandoitbig Green Belt

    jcandoitbig
    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2013
    Messages:
    1,106
    Likes Received:
    258
    Location:
    SD, CA
    don't think I mentioned an injury....I just had to take time off with work and relationship issues. I trained about 4 years 4x a week prior....

    thanks for the advice, yes I know mat time is the most important thing however I was curious if anyone had insight into specific drills or anything that enabled a quicker recovery to former "mode"
     
    #18
  19. jcandoitbig Green Belt

    jcandoitbig
    Joined:
    Jun 15, 2013
    Messages:
    1,106
    Likes Received:
    258
    Location:
    SD, CA
    yea i'm not worried about that I swam in college so my body is acclimated to whatever I throw at it. I was more curious if there were specific things people did to get back to where they were
     
    #19
  20. vodkaBearSnow White Belt

    vodkaBearSnow
    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2012
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    12
    Location:
    Moscow
    Mind your language. I train at the speed and intensity that's normal in my school, and it's a grind, and it's 2 hours. Nobody trains 1 hour except for lazy fucks who like to waste 2 hours drive for 1 hour of class.

    A lot of injuries do happen because of people like you creating atmosphere where not "being a ninny" is a valid reason to train through the injury that requires taking a break and doing proper rehab.
    I've seen people killing their athletic careers because of attitude like this.

    And as for "serious problems", names of these problems are full-time work, long rides and lack of proper sleep which you would have heard of if you've thought a bit before posting.
     
    #20
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2017

Share This Page

monitoring_string = "fd5733925866a04e50edd70f38dfaa35"
monitoring_string = "603ac9fff68f23709f2a42bf5e29272b"