2017 Atlantic Hurricane Season: The Most Expensive in U.S. History | Page 55

Discussion in 'The War Room' started by Arkain2K, Aug 30, 2017.

  1. Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

    Arkain2K
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    That was supposed to be the northern part of Puerto Rico after that area got swiped by Irma, but now pretty much the entire island is in the dark after Maria.

    I'm just glad the Mods are doing a very good job at keeping those retards away from our PBP discussion, and bring the hammer down swiftly on those who didn't bother reading the OP :)

    They were all equally-useless. One post is already more than enough "contribution" than we need.
     
    #1081
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2017
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  2. rj144 Black Belt

    rj144
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    You have pages of copy and pasted posts in a row. Man, people in glass houses.
     
    #1082
  3. Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

    Arkain2K
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    What the hell do you think we made this Live Updates thread for? How much of the OP were you able to understand with your limited reading-comprehension skill?

    If you have actual photos/videos/news updates to contribute like other people, feel free to do so, but if all you can offer is multiple useless one-liners like these, keep on walking to any of the other threads so people don't have to wade through them to get to the news updates they came here for.

     
    #1083
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2017
  4. rj144 Black Belt

    rj144
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    You made it the Live Updates thread. Who's the we in that sentence?

    Live updates don't mean walls of text every five minutes.

    I'm also in your OP, dipshit. Did you lose power for a week due to a hurricane living in CA?
     
    #1084
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2017
  5. Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

    Arkain2K
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    Photos of Puerto Rico After Hurricane Maria

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    en walk past downed trees after the passage of Hurricane Maria, in San Juan, Puerto Rico, on September 20, 2017. Maria made landfall on Puerto Rico's southeast coast around daybreak, packing winds of around 150 mph (240 kph).


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    A man rescues a rooster from his flooded garage as Hurricane Maria hits Puerto Rico in Fajardo


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    San Juan is seen during a power loss after Hurricane Maria made landfall on September 20, 2017, in Puerto Rico. Thousands of people sought refuge in shelters, and electricity and phone lines have been severely affected.


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    Locals help clear debris from a road after the passing of Hurricane Maria in Yabucoa, Puerto Rico


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    People are transported down a road flooded by Hurricane Maria in Juana Matos, Catano, Puerto Rico

     
    #1085
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2017
  6. Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

    Arkain2K
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    [​IMG]
    A resident surveys the damage to her property after Hurricane Maria made landfall on September 21, 2017, in the Guaynabo suburb of San Juan, Puerto Rico


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    A destroyed shack is seen in the Rio Piedras area in San Juan on September 21, 2017


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    A man wades through a flooded road as Hurricane Maria hits Puerto Rico in Fajardo


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    Damage in the La Perla neighborhood, the day after Hurricane Maria made landfall


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    A storm-damaged supermarket hit by Hurricane Maria in Guayama, Puerto Rico

     
    #1086
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2017
  7. Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

    Arkain2K
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    [​IMG]
    A man walks in a flooded street, pulling a boat in Catano town in Juana Matos, Puerto Rico


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    A sculpture lies on its side after Hurricane Maria hit San Juan


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    A damaged banana plantation is seen after the area was hit by Hurricane Maria in Guayama, Puerto Rico


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    A dog stands next to fallen trees and damaged houses in Salinas, Puerto Rico


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    An overturned vehicle lies in a parking lot after the passing of Hurricane Maria in Yabucoa


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    A man points to his destroyed house in a Catano town in Juana Matos, Puerto Rico


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    A plantain field stands under water after the passing of Hurricane Maria in Yabucoa​
     
    #1087
  8. Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

    Arkain2K
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    Cracks in a Puerto Rican Dam Send Neighbors a Message: Leave Now
    By FRANCES ROBLES | SEPT. 23, 2017

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    Officials said the dam had cracked after Hurricane Maria, and urged neighboring areas to evacuate.​


    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/23/us/guajataca-dam-puerto-rico.html
     
    #1088
  9. Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

    Arkain2K
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    Puerto Rico mayors say 'hysteria starting to spread,' plead for help
    Sept 23, 2017

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    http://www.foxnews.com/us/2017/09/2...steria-starting-to-spread-plead-for-help.html
     
    #1089
  10. HockeyBjj Putting on the foil

    HockeyBjj
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    Some good news, my cousin's wife from Puerto Rico is ok. She had gone home to visit family for 2 weeks and chose a poor week to do so. He didn't have contact with her for 4 days after the storm.

    She's ok, took shelter in the hospital she used to work in before moving to US and is sticking around to volunteer as a nurse. She says it's as bad or worse than the photos are showing. Will try to get her remaining family to US if she can.

    These are the types of people who should be given refugee status. Especially off the smaller islands with 0 economy to rebuild
     
    #1090
  11. Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

    Arkain2K
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  12. Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

    Arkain2K
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  13. Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

    Arkain2K
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    Who will help Puerto Rico?
    by Jill Disis and Julia Horowitz | September 26, 2017

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    http://money.cnn.com/2017/09/26/news/economy/puerto-rico-hurricane-maria-cost/index.html
     
    #1093
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  14. HockeyBjj Putting on the foil

    HockeyBjj
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    My cousin's wife's Facebook post, sharing since I don't think we have a sherdogger on the ground there so we can have a 1st person perspective:

    Friends and family in the states, PR needs your help. We are not ok. There is no water, electricity, or gas. There is very limited signal. It's been one week since Hurricane Maria and no grocery stores are open. This means that people are desperate for resources are willing to do anything. There is no law. The more days that pass by the less humanity you see in people. Our aid is being held, post offices are not opening until October 1st so donations won't reach us. Please be our voice since our representatives in the island are not speaking loud enough for us. Talk to your congress men and women for help. We are in a state of anarchy.

    In the comments she says this in responses

    "No. There are no stores open. There is no diesel fuel for the generators."

    "We need people from everywhere to be our voice. We are running out of food and have no place to replenish. There's no diesel fuel for the businesses to operate. People are showing up to gas stations with weapons and stealing people's gas from their cars. There's no signal for us to call the cops. The more days that pass, the worse it's getting. This place is becoming no mans land."

    This isn't someone who embellishes. This is someone who's word I trust. Apparently they have sporadic cell service. She could post text but not pictures
     
    #1094
  15. Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

    Arkain2K
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    I completely believe her, because we all have seen the anarchy on the main land after Hurricane Andrew and Katrina. 3 days is the limit that turns law-abiding people into animals in the shroud of darkness.

    The good news is, the Army will soon be taking over relief operations from the Navy and there will be boots on the grounds to bring chaos to order.


    Dear Government: Send in troops to Puerto Rico. This catastrophe demands it.
    By Bryan Norcross | September 27, 2017

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    All Americans should be horrified by the depth of the tragedy in Puerto Rico. While we can’t forget our friends who are suffering in Texas and Florida — especially in the Keys — from Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, the Puerto Rican tragedy is on a different scale.

    The island’s power, water, and communications infrastructure was debilitated and substantially destroyed when Hurricane Maria raked the island from end to end one week ago. Every town is a disaster area. The Army says that over a million people have no drinking water. Many people have not yet been able to contact to the outside world just to confirm that they are alive. It is impossible to describe the scope of the catastrophe in Puerto Rico and the surrounding islands.

    Despite superhuman efforts on the part of FEMA and innumerable agencies and organizations to provide aid and alleviate suffering, the despair is still deepening in untouched parts of the island. The entire island is entering its second week in a condition that can only be described as unlivable.

    While every catastrophe is different, the images and descriptions of apocalyptic destruction combined with large-scale suffering reminded me of the scenes of devastation and isolation I saw after Hurricane Andrew demolished the suburbs south of Miami in August 1992. Despite the best efforts of many good people working around the clock deploying every resource at their disposal, the Andrew disaster zone was simply too big to control, the numbers of people in peril were too large. Three days after the storm, in the pitch-black nights and tropical heat with looters running free, the southern part of Dade County, Fla., slipped into chaos. Anarchy ruled.

    In the end, the U.S. Army was required to bring order to the madness.

    As I recounted in my book, “My Hurricane Andrew Story,” which was published earlier this year, one of the most important lessons we learned from the Hurricane Andrew experience was that the civilian systems for dealing with a major disaster cannot handle a cataclysm, no matter the skill of the administrators or the intensity of the effort. What follows is the Andrew lesson labeled, “Send in the Troops”:

    The only entity in our society that can bring command and control to a catastrophe zone is the United States military. They come with housing, transportation, communications, and guns. Any catastrophe plan that doesn’t have the military on the ground with a general in charge of organization and security immediately after the event is not a catastrophe plan.

    In a mega disaster, everybody is affected, and has post-event chores and responsibilities. Rare is the public servant who can dedicate themselves to disaster recovery with no concern for his or her home, family, pet, and myriad post-storm issues.

    Only the military has the heft to make a dent in a disaster scene like Andrew produced. Every hour their deployment is delayed adds an hour of pain and torment for people caught in the destruction zone.

    The U.S. military is increasingly becoming involved in the Puerto Rican response effort, which is a good sign, but the comparisons with the eventual Andrew response are stark. The Andrew catastrophe zone was, perhaps, 250 square miles and involved about 350,000 people — closer to 100,000 after those that could resettled elsewhere did. It took about 20,000 troops and military-support personnel to provide security, housing, communications, and other critical services after Andrew. They were still operating the Homestead tent city eight months after the storm.

    Puerto Rico is about 3,500 square miles and home to about 3.4 million people. Having seen firsthand the crisis that developed in the first few weeks after Andrew, and the seeming endlessness of the 1992 disaster zone, it is impossible for me to imagine the scope of the calamity engulfing Puerto Rico. And, having learned that only the military has the ability to deliver men, materiel, organization and leadership in the time frame required, I am left to wonder why that Andrew lesson wasn’t applied to this catastrophic situation, which is at least an order of magnitude larger.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news...s-to-puerto-rico-this-catastrophe-demands-it/
     
    #1095
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  16. Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

    Arkain2K
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    Pentagon deploys Army general and more troops to lead hurricane response on Puerto Rico
    By COREY DICKSTEIN | September 27, 2017

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    Soldiers with the 101st Combat Aviation Brigade, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) and Airmen assigned to the 22nd Airlift Squadron, 60th Air Mobility Wing stationed at Travis Air Force Base, Calif., load an HH-60 medevac Black Hawk helicopter, Sept. 26, into a C-5M Super Galaxy at Campbell Army Airfield. The helicopter is one of eight aircraft the division deployed to Puerto Rico on Wednesday, Sept. 27, 2017.


    WASHINGTON — The Pentagon is shifting its response to Hurricane Maria-ravaged Puerto Rico to a land-based operation as it clears airfields and adds communications capabilities, allowing it flow more troops onto the ailing U.S. island, defense officials said Wednesday.

    U.S. Northern Command on Wednesday sent 16 Army helicopters to Puerto Rico and was preparing to deploy a portion of a sustainment brigade — some 1,000 soldiers who specialize in distribution of goods in hostile environments — to the U.S. territory of 3.4 million people left devastated by the Category 4 storm that struck the island Sept. 20, Pentagon officials said.

    The military’s top general on Tuesday pledged the U.S. territories in the Caribbean would receive the full support of the Defense Department.

    “We’re going to do everything we can to help them out,” Dunford told senators on Capitol Hill. “We’re anticipating what they will need to get ahead of it.”

    That included tasking an Army brigadier general to take command of the nearly 5,000 active-duty forces operating on the island alongside some 2,500 National Guard members, said Army Lt. Col. Jamie Davis, a Pentagon spokesman. Brig. Gen. Rich Kim, Army North’s deputy commander, arrived in Puerto Rico on Wednesday to establish a land-based command structure, taking over for the USS Kearsarge-based commander who had been leading military response operations.

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    Soldiers of the Puerto Rico National Guard patrol one of the main highway of the metropolitan area affected by the flood after the Hurricane Maria on Sept. 22, 2017.

    During the last week, the military has relied primarily on moving relief supplies and launching search-and-rescue operations from the Kearsarge, an amphibious assault ship staged between Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. National Guard members along with Marines and sailors from the Kearsarge had cleared runways at 10 of the island’s airports by Wednesday, drastically increasing the flow of aircraft flying onto the island, Davis said.

    The military aims to fly about 10 planes per hour into the region Wednesday to provide relief. Only three to six aircraft had been able land each hour previously, Davis said.

    Nearly all of Puerto Rico remained without power Wednesday and nearly half of its inhabitants did not have access to drinking water, according to the Pentagon. The military had helped restore some level of power to 59 of the island’s 69 hospitals by Wednesday, but most of them remained unable to provide advanced care.

    The Pentagon has tasked the USNS Comfort, a Mercy-class hospital ship based at Naval Station Norfolk in Virginia, to leave for Puerto Rico by the weekend. The ship has 1,000 hospital beds and carriers medical evacuation helicopters. But it will be well into next week before the Comfort arrives in the region, Davis said.

    The Pentagon is also sending small medical and surgical teams to Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, he said. Davis did not provide specific information about the units or where they would operate.

    The influx of Army helicopters – eight from the Fort Campbell, Kentucky-based 101st Airborne Division and eight more from the 82nd Airborne Division out of Fort Bragg, North Carolina – will bring the total number of military helicopters operating in Puerto Rico to 40 by Thursday.

    At the request of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the military shipped about 350 satellite telephones to aid people in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, many of whom have been unable to communicate with family members and friends for nearly a week, Davis said. Cell phone service remains down for about 95 percent of Puerto Rico.

    It was also sending military teams – including tactical communications specialists from Georgia’s Fort Stewart and civil affairs experts from Fort Bragg – to Puerto Rico to assist efforts to increase communications among government agencies and within the local population, officials said.

    https://www.stripes.com/news/pentag...ad-hurricane-response-on-puerto-rico-1.489835
     
    #1096
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  17. mr.bigglesworth Red Belt

    mr.bigglesworth
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    Horrific stuff but at least we have an experience to learn from. The delayed response is a bit worrisome though
     
    #1097
  18. Clippy RESORT CLIPPY IS HERE!! I'm on a BOAT!!!!!

    Clippy
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    Nate is coming!
     
    #1098
  19. Overpressure Titanium Belt

    Overpressure
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    Back when I asked if we were looking at another Katrina I meant a presidential PR disaster, and hoo boy...
     
    #1099
  20. Arkain2K Si vis pacem, para bellum

    Arkain2K
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